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Can a merchant confiscate a counterfeit bill?

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  • #16
    Well, in my case the next store may still be within the shopping center, but you're right - I'm actually there to protect the shopping center, not be an LP agent for each and every store.
    Some stores assume "security" means protecting them from theft in their premises. If people are in physical danger, we act; mere theft (or fraud) is strictly "observe, report and document."
    Last edited by Condo Guard; 12-11-2017, 07:55 PM.

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    • #17
      I would say yes. Did the customer know they were handling counterfeit money? If no, advise the customer that their money is counterfeit and to use real currency or a credit/debit card to complete their intended transaction. In addition, advise the customer that the counterfeit currency will stay with the cashier. After all, the customer willingly gave the counterfeit bill to the cashier and/or merchant. If the customer is still not satisfied, advise the customer that a call will be placed to the police. There will always be customer service first, but there can be so many times one can be firm yet polite.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by mrsolenya.vn View Post
        I would say yes. Did the customer know they were handling counterfeit money? If no, advise the customer that their money is counterfeit and to use real currency or a credit/debit card to complete their intended transaction. In addition, advise the customer that the counterfeit currency will stay with the cashier. After all, the customer willingly gave the counterfeit bill to the cashier and/or merchant. If the customer is still not satisfied, advise the customer that a call will be placed to the police. There will always be customer service first, but there can be so many times one can be firm yet polite.
        With all due respect nobody cares what you would say. Unless you're the security consultant for the client and you're helping them establish policy nobody cares about your opinion. And I'm not saying that to be a forum jerk I'm saying that because that's reality. The reality is that as a guard or even a first-line supervisor we don't set policy we do what we're told and in the absence of clear instructions you ask your supervisor what they would have you do.

        That way you're covered. That way WHEN it comes back on you (and it will)you can point to the next guy up to chain and say "I did exactly what he told me to do and here's my documentation"

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Ingio Montoya View Post

          With all due respect nobody cares what you would say. Unless you're the security consultant for the client and you're helping them establish policy nobody cares about your opinion. And I'm not saying that to be a forum jerk I'm saying that because that's reality. The reality is that as a guard or even a first-line supervisor we don't set policy we do what we're told and in the absence of clear instructions you ask your supervisor what they would have you do.

          That way you're covered. That way WHEN it comes back on you (and it will)you can point to the next guy up to chain and say "I did exactly what he told me to do and here's my documentation"
          I generally agree, though I would add four things that all security guards (and other employees) should keep in mind regarding company/client policies.

          1. Policies cannot supersede the law. Your company/client cannot make illegal things legal.

          2. Don't assume that policies are necessarily legal. Many of them are written by people who are not legal experts and the policies are not vetted by legal experts.

          3. Don't assume that your company will "have your back" if you get into legal trouble for breaking policies.

          4. Don't assume that because x policy appears to be "common sense" that it is fact legal.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
            3. Don't assume that your company will "have your back" if you get into legal trouble for breaking policies.
            I would go so far as to say assume your company DOESN'T have your back

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            • #21
              Best thing to do is play dumb, and at MOST tell the customer "Sorry, can't accept that bill".

              Always treat the customer like innocent victim, even if your Spider Sense screams otherwise.

              IMO, it would be OK in most cases to quietly accept a suspect bill(s) if the amount isn't too much, and alert management of your suspicions. Then they can use the Bogus Bills as training props, and while the Govt wont be 'buying' them, management might earn Brownie Points with local PD etc by bringing it to their attention, maybe along with pics of who was passing them. MORE than likely the cops or Feds will already know their names, and who knows it might be what finally puts them behind bars. If you do take the bills, call cops AND keep a Chain Of Custody.

              Do what your Client store owner and maybe his insurance would want you to do.

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