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Valor Security @ Ontario Mills Mall

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  • Apolo
    replied
    seems a bit contradictive, company's name being valor and all

    Leave a comment:


  • SecureTN
    replied
    Sounds about right... Working with Valor right now...

    Leave a comment:


  • 4795209
    replied
    Valor and other mall security operations

    I have worked for Valor and other mall security operations/companies. As someone with prior security experience and solid references and some education, security jobs seem like a decent "stop gap" measure: a job to get to pay the bills while you seek out long-term, stable employment.

    If you work for any of the outfits for more than a few months (90 days) you are considered a "senior" staffer. Directors of security quit or are fired or demoted on average every six months, with security "officers" quitting more regularly due to low pay, horrible morale, and brutal schedules. Every mall does things differently. One mall I worked at rotated security "officers" with drivers every several hours, while another had security staff riding bicycles, golf carts and walking aimlessly on foot for hours at a time - despite below freezing conditions and not providing winter clothing.

    As a security "officer" you are told both in writing and verbally, not to do anything and that you have no real authority to arrest or detain. I have been told repeatedly by multiple security companies, not to carry mace or any other weapons on my person, and that I could not even wear winter apparel outdoors unless they were approved or company issued. I did it anyway.

    As a security officer, you must be prepared to work brutal rotating shifts with few days off or wildly erratic and illogical schedules, work in all weather conditions with your own clothing, be prepared to wear uniforms that may or may not fit for months at a time, and understand that you are present for insurance companies not to protect anyone or anything. You have no authority to arrest, detain, search, or do much of anything else - except as a private citizen. Just show up and wander around, and you'll do well, and if you see anything dangerous or unusual, call it in and document what you see and hear. If people are fighting, just wait for police. If a robbery takes place, just wait for police. If you are confronted with violence, just run and hide.

    That's it.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Was this an upscale establishment in Northwood?

    That site lost its batons, can only use OC when being physically attacked, and has enough red tape to work though to make me wince.

    They got pretty red-light LED light bars, though, and their trucks look like Sheriff's vehicles. "Department of Public Safety," which is great cause it doesn't say who they are at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowslinger
    replied
    I worked for Valor about three years at a Chicago area mall, the mall was “in house” when Valor took over they kept everyone and made no changes. The “in house” security never required a p.e.r.c. Card, Valor paid for these upon the change, which I thought was great.

    NO Valor officer at this mall was EVER to chase and apprehend any person, our cuffs and pepper spray were only to be used should a person become unruly threatening the safety of the officer, any patron or mall/store employees. If shoplifting occurred in a store and an employee called security, we dispatched an officer to the store. The officer was only to observe the “arrest = we are holding you until police arrive” by the person who saw the incident take place, if the person ran the officer was simply to follow and note the escape route. Running rarely happened as we had a police sub station in the mall, once the security officer deemed an arrest by the employee was going to happen, a police officer was also sent to the scene. If a police officer was not available, we escorted them to the security office, and yes 90% simply went with you. A professional uniform and an officer carrying himself well carries a lot of weight, all the people see is some sort of law enforcement. They really have no clue as to just what authority you have; this makes most people follow instructions really well.

    As far as the vehicle damage incident, if I fired every officer that damaged a vehicle, I would have been the only guy there. Never even had the suspicion that any officer may have done it on purpose, but that would have been another story. Disregard for public safety could have simply been, it happened where people walked accessing the mall? We always ran little investigations, reviewing video if possible, to determine just how bad an incident was whether it involved a vehicle or someone feeling security stepped over some line in dealing with them, theft, etc.

    I liked Valor, had some issues but no major things I could not deal with.

    Leave a comment:


  • treetop
    replied
    I have had 6 years of experience working with Valor in a management capacity, I left voluntarily. Of course like any company they have their strengths and weaknesses, but my experienced opinion is that the latter outweighs the former. If anyone has any questions please let me know.

    Leave a comment:


  • SD Security
    replied
    I was just curious as to how this situation was going? Was a lawsuit filed?

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    I didn't make myself real clear here. What I meant was according to certain states' laws, Valor can not block dwdorow from seeing his own personnel file. They have to give him access to it. He would have grounds for a civil suit.
    Ah, I see what you mean.

    Leave a comment:


  • T202
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Most of those laws don't apply when the Department of Homeland Security conducts a background investigation, though. In some cases, you incur federal crmiinal violations for not releasing information, as a matter of hindering national security.

    Its the difference between an employer asking, "Would you hire this guy again," and a federal agent asking, "Submit documentation of all violations of policy or procedure the employee committed."
    I didn't make myself real clear here. What I meant was according to certain states' laws, Valor can not block dwdorow from seeing his own personnel file. They have to give him access to it. He would have grounds for a civil suit.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    Depending on what state you were working in, there are laws pertaining to employees and former employees right to view their personnel files. Sounds like it might be lawyer time.
    Most of those laws don't apply when the Department of Homeland Security conducts a background investigation, though. In some cases, you incur federal crmiinal violations for not releasing information, as a matter of hindering national security.

    Its the difference between an employer asking, "Would you hire this guy again," and a federal agent asking, "Submit documentation of all violations of policy or procedure the employee committed."

    Leave a comment:


  • T202
    replied
    Depending on what state you were working in, there are laws pertaining to employees and former employees right to view their personnel files. Sounds like it might be lawyer time.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    While it can be argued that you were negligent in damaging Valor Security's property, "disregard for public safety" is yet another method that Valor Directors of Security use to make their departments have vague quazi-authority.

    It does not sound that "omg" if you say, "total disregard for security." But use the word Public Safety in place of Security like Valor does (for all things), and it becomes much worse.

    Since this was reported to a government agency that keeps records, and since such terms as "public safety" and ""hazardous and unsafe behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle." I hope they can prove those statements. The Department of Motor Vehicles determines if you are hazardous and unsafe behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle, not a security company that calls its self a public safety department.

    My suggestion to you is to retain an attorney and pursue damages.

    Leave a comment:


  • dwdorow
    replied
    My Experience with Valor

    I am not sure if this is any value to someone seeking employment at Valor Security, but I'll tell my story.

    I worked at a local Valor mall from April 2006 to July 2006 as a security officer. I was recommended for the supervisor position and well-liked by all of my co-workers and superiors. I received outstanding marks in all the testing and "new guy classes."
    At the beginning of July I was terminated for damaging one of the security vehicles. It was the company's right to fire me as I was the one who made a mistake. I was on routine patrol in one of the parking garages and I bumped a low ceiling with the light bar on top of the vehicle. The employee handbook clearly states that anyone who damages Valor property is subject to termination.

    A week after my termination I decided that I wanted to finish up my training and become a pilot. To do that, I needed to be approved by the FAA, TSA and Homeland security. When I applied they said that I was unable to be approved because I had a mark on my record from Valor saying I demonstrated, "Blatant negligence and total disregard for public safety" and that I was "hazardous and unsafe behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle." This was a surprise to me. When my incident happened at Valor, the garage was empty and I was the only person in the vehicle. I did no damage to any person or mall property, just the company vehicle.

    I tried to contact the security director via phone several times leaving polite courteous messages asking how I can get my records at Valor review and remade (you know in a more truthful light.) I found out after one week of phone calls that the director personally advised every guard on staff that if they should receive a phone call from me they are not to let me speak to any Valor or Mall personnel.
    This director, who I might mention is extremely overweight, will not even give me a phone number to call to just find out information. I recorded every voicemail I left and every conversation I had. Thank god I did, because now, thanks to Mr. "too many donuts" director, I have to peruse legal action against company and the mall. All I ever really wanted to do in my life was fly planes. I went through 3 years of the Marine Corps and 3 years of public service to be qualified to do it. I hope that I can someday pick up the pieces that Valor has broken my dreams into.

    If you want to work for Valor, go ahead, but don't even think about making a mistake. It will ruin your entire career and prevent you from ever holding a public service/transportation position again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Firemankoz
    replied
    Easy There Big Fella....

    It was just a theory..... Our guys get all phases at the same time as well, some guys carry a flash light in the OC holster...I dont know, What I am wondering how long is your cuff training? we don't just slap the cuffs on, we do speed cuff drills, over/under, all types, it takes 4 hours of just classroom/ litigation training etc we just dont issue, train to slap then have them go at it. we then go into defensive tatics.

    I also agree, if we pepper someone, we must restrain them with cuffs.
    None of my officer carry unless they do the ENTIRE monadnock training
    course.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002
    To carry OC and a Stinger, and no cuffs creates problems. If the officer is not yet trained to use cuffs, then they shouldn't be equipped at all yet. When I train new officers, handcuffing takes the least amount of time. It is not rocket science to get cuffs on somebody. With that said, if that officer were to walk into an assault in progress I would assume he would likely deploy his OC/CS and/or Stinger. So now you have an assault suspect who has been maced, but is not under control because you can't cuff him, and you are waiting for PD to arrive. The officer could attempt to physically restrain, but that opens up officer and/or suspect injuries. Just because you mace someone, doesn't mean they will stop what they are doing. Basically, my company will not give you equipment in phases. You train for everything, you are equipped with everything... no exceptions.
    This is what I believe, as well. If you can't restrain your attacker, or the person your trying to detain, all you can do is cause them physical harm until they submit, or are rendered unconcious or dead.

    Leave a comment:

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