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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Good comeback on the fruit part. The second part is not applicable because I have the option/right to decide whether to pay at the pump or complete the transaction inside. Deliberately creating security problems and then lying about how it happened is not a right, nor is it right.
    Where I livem when paying at the pump you are required to also put in you zip code. This just started about 3 months ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    It amazes me that this zip step is added but the Cashiers hardly ever verify the signature on the card's back. I can understand the need to put more security on the users as well, but hopefully will help deter some bad guys.

    It is just a matter of time until we need to select other options, 1 for internet maps, 2 for radio, 3 for a "short" survey, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
    (Thanks, one thing I love about forums, I never think about the conversation 15 minutes later and think, "Damn, that woulda been a good comeback" cause I usually have 15 minutes to spit out the response anyway )

    Anyway, what I am getting at is this, you may have the right to go inside, but you seem to want to go inside for the sheer purpose to create work for a cashier, I think that is wrong. I guess a better analogy would be like someone doesnt feel the need to sign in when they arrive at a work place, they think they should just have to swipe their security badge and that is all. They also know that the Security Officer who tends to the book has to process incoming property forms as an utmost priority. So one day they decide instead of bringing in a box of pencils and having a single property intake form for the entire box, they come in with 16 individual forms for each pencil in the box, which is their right to do when push comes to shove. They have done so knowing that it will slow the S/O down, and hold up the line of incoming employees as I am now overwhelmed with work; and they hope the client will take notice and axe the signing in all together so others can bypass and get in so "the S/O doesnt get overwhelmed."
    Better analogy. Having considered your post and Jackhole's, I think you may have a point. I guess I've been a baaaaad boy.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    My brother used to work for Radio Shack. (As a side note they don't exist in Quebec anymore - they were owned by a company that had a license to use the Radio Shack name. This company was bought by Circuit City, Radio Shack's biggest competitor. Radio Shack sued & forced them from using the name - the stores are now known as The Source/La Source by/par Circuit City!) Anyway I was told that the request for you postal code (or zip code down south) was for marketing, so that they could send you the catalogue more than for security.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    First, let me be upfront about the fact that this is NOT a major inconvenience by any stretch of the imagination. That having been said, here's what I dislike about this trend in requiring the customer to enter yet another form of data in order to complete what should be a quick transaction:

    - Enter credit card just right. Too fast or slow and it will not be processed.
    - Do you want a receipt? (Usually out of paper anyhow; but still requires entry)
    - Do you want a car wash? Yet another selection.
    - Enter your zip code.

    It used to be that all you did was swipe your card and you were good to go. Soon it will be:

    - What kind of vehicle are you refilling?
    - What is your telephone number in case we need to contact you?
    - What did you have for breakfast...just kidding; but you get the idea.
    I've never had a problem with the card not reading at the pump, perhaps it's user error? Some people don't want a receipt. When I use my credit card, I don't want one. When I use my debit card, I do. Do I want a car wash? No, but I bet some others do and since the car wash doesn't accept credit cards, it would be nice to pay for both your gas and car wash at the same time. As far as the ZIP code, that's so when your card gets stolen, idiots can't use your card at every gas station from here to Tijuana.

    I appreciate everything that retailers do to prevent fraud. Asking for ZIP codes at the pump, checking signatures on the back of cards, Hell I was even asked for ID when I used my credit card at Taco Bell the other day. Yes, I felt slightly inconveniced because I was in a hurry, but after I thought about it - they were protecting both themselves and me from fraud. After all, if someone takes your card and makes unauthorized transactions, who pays for it when you dispute the charges? That's right, the merchant. Can you really blame them for wanting to avoid charge-backs by the credit card companies?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Good comeback on the fruit part.
    (Thanks, one thing I love about forums, I never think about the conversation 15 minutes later and think, "Damn, that woulda been a good comeback" cause I usually have 15 minutes to spit out the response anyway )

    Anyway, what I am getting at is this, you may have the right to go inside, but you seem to want to go inside for the sheer purpose to create work for a cashier, I think that is wrong. I guess a better analogy would be like someone doesnt feel the need to sign in when they arrive at a work place, they think they should just have to swipe their security badge and that is all. They also know that the Security Officer who tends to the book has to process incoming property forms as an utmost priority. So one day they decide instead of bringing in a box of pencils and having a single property intake form for the entire box, they come in with 16 individual forms for each pencil in the box, which is their right to do when push comes to shove. They have done so knowing that it will slow the S/O down, and hold up the line of incoming employees as I am now overwhelmed with work; and they hope the client will take notice and axe the signing in all together so others can bypass and get in so "the S/O doesnt get overwhelmed."

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
    It may be apples and oranges, but it's still fruit.
    You are making work for the cashier in hopes they will be overwhelmed and the zip code requirement will be axed from the pay at the pump process. You could easily punch in the zip code and be done with it, but instead you have decided to try to overwhelm the clerk with work.

    How is that different than someone creating problems or extra work for an S/O for the sake of proving a point to a manager when they could just as easily go about their day relatively uneffected by security had they not done anything at all?
    Good comeback on the fruit part. The second part is not applicable because I have the option/right to decide whether to pay at the pump or complete the transaction inside. Deliberately creating security problems and then lying about how it happened is not a right, nor is it right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    First, let me be upfront about the fact that this is NOT a major inconvenience by any stretch of the imagination. That having been said, here's what I dislike about this trend in requiring the customer to enter yet another form of data in order to complete what should be a quick transaction:

    - Enter credit card just right. Too fast or slow and it will not be processed.
    - Do you want a receipt? (Usually out of paper anyhow; but still requires entry)
    - Do you want a car wash? Yet another selection.
    - Enter your zip code.

    It used to be that all you did was swipe your card and you were good to go. Soon it will be:

    - What kind of vehicle are you refilling?
    - What is your telephone number in case we need to contact you?
    - What did you have for breakfast...just kidding; but you get the idea.
    Mr. Security:
    Here in Manassas and now Haymarket, I have given my ZIP code for the last several years when purchasing gasoline and at several electronics stores. At Radio Shack they have been asking for the past five years for my phone number and they put it into the computer and it gives them who I am and a photo. I see nothing wrong about this as it is but one more important step in combating credit card fraud.
    I teach some of the new clerks how surreptitious run the top of the credit with their fingers. If it is very smooth chances are it is genuine. If the numbers are rough to the touch, chances are it is a fake. I learned that as one of the local ASIS Chapter meetings from the SAIC, Secret Service. Neat stuff!
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    It may be apples and oranges, but it's still fruit.

    You are making work for the cashier in hopes they will be overwhelmed and the zip code requirement will be axed from the pay at the pump process. You could easily punch in the zip code and be done with it, but instead you have decided to try to overwhelm the clerk with work.

    How is that different than someone creating problems or extra work for an S/O for the sake of proving a point to a manager when they could just as easily go about their day relatively uneffected by security had they not done anything at all?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
    I think that is just like someone at a work place deliberately unlocking locked doors, unlocking windows, leaving computers logged on, blocking fire extinguishers, lowering flags, etc... etc... etc... and reporting it to their supervisor immediately after, just to show the management that security officers are a waste of money.

    I dont believe in "attacking" the little guy to get at the big guy.
    Apples and oranges on that analogy.
    Last edited by Mr. Security; 10-01-2006, 09:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    I'm curious to know how entering your ZIP code is inconvenient to you.
    First, let me be upfront about the fact that this is NOT a major inconvenience by any stretch of the imagination. That having been said, here's what I dislike about this trend in requiring the customer to enter yet another form of data in order to complete what should be a quick transaction:

    - Enter credit card just right. Too fast or slow and it will not be processed.
    - Do you want a receipt? (Usually out of paper anyhow; but still requires entry)
    - Do you want a car wash? Yet another selection.
    - Enter your zip code.

    It used to be that all you did was swipe your card and you were good to go. Soon it will be:

    - What kind of vehicle are you refilling?
    - What is your telephone number in case we need to contact you?
    - What did you have for breakfast...just kidding; but you get the idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    That's true. But if the clerk is unable to keep up with the increased workload brought on by customers who choose to have their fuel payment processed by a human instead of a machine (the whole idea behind automation is to speed up the transactions) then management will question the value of purchasing pumps that inconvenience the customer. Hiring and employing people is expensive.
    I think that is just like someone at a work place deliberately unlocking locked doors, unlocking windows, leaving computers logged on, blocking fire extinguishers, lowering flags, etc... etc... etc... and reporting it to their supervisor immediately after, just to show the management that security officers are a waste of money.

    I dont believe in "attacking" the little guy to get at the big guy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    That's true. But if the clerk is unable to keep up with the increased workload brought on by customers who choose to have their fuel payment processed by a human instead of a machine (the whole idea behind automation is to speed up the transactions) then management will question the value of purchasing pumps that inconvenience the customer. Hiring and employing people is expensive.
    I'm curious to know how entering your ZIP code is inconvenient to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by LavianoTS386
    It's not the clerk's fault.
    That's true. But if the clerk is unable to keep up with the increased workload brought on by customers who choose to have their fuel payment processed by a human instead of a machine (the whole idea behind automation is to speed up the transactions) then management will question the value of purchasing pumps that inconvenience the customer. Hiring and employing people is expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Biometric devices like fingerprint, eye, facial etc. are becoming more prominent.


    "More important, many people will resist the idea of giving their fingerprints to a retailer without strong assurances their privacy will be protected."

    Millions of people entering Disney World are using fingerprint readers now, we have no idea how the records are stored and by who, we just want to get to the gift shops, uh, I mean, to see the park.

    Leave a comment:

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