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Man Suing Walmart For $5 Million After Being Wrongly Arrested And Tased

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  • Man Suing Walmart For $5 Million After Being Wrongly Arrested And Tased

    Want to bet on how this case comes out?

    Opposing Views
    By Dominic Kelly, Mon, March 24, 2014

    Harold Burrowes was tased and wrongly arrested after purchasing thousands of dollars worth of Walmart gift cards, and now, he’s suing the company for $5 million.


    Back in September of 2011, Burrowes, the owner of a wrecker service, purchased over $3,000 in Walmart gift cards to be used to buy diesel fuel. Burrowes says that he had been doing that instead of issuing company credit cards so his tow truck drivers could purchase fuel.


    When Burrowes went to purchase the gift cards, the cashier informed him that he wasn’t allowed to buy them using another gift card.

    Read more...
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

  • #2
    Well... Looks like he's getting a new fleet of trucks...

    Good example of why using ODO's is a BAD idea.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Soper View Post
      Well... Looks like he's getting a new fleet of trucks...

      Good example of why using ODO's is a BAD idea.
      exactly. i habe always thought that using off duty officers for private security is a horrinle idea.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Soper View Post
        Well... Looks like he's getting a new fleet of trucks...

        Good example of why using ODO's is a BAD idea.
        Seems like a lot of the ODO screw up doing private security work.

        He was working off duty gig for a private security contractor versus working directly for the
        police department on overtime. So I assume he made a citizens arrest versus a arrest as a Police Officer??

        Comment


        • #5
          The problem is we (for the most part, because I've heard some companies in this area do) don't rely on PC, we need to actually see the concealment or at least be led to believe that is the only possible reason why the merch isn't where we last saw. 2 different mind sets.
          Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

          THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by zm88 View Post
            The problem is we (for the most part, because I've heard some companies in this area do) don't rely on PC, we need to actually see the concealment or at least be led to believe that is the only possible reason why the merch isn't where we last saw. 2 different mind sets.
            At times I have hired off duty officers to work shoplifting. There were issues including following company policies regarding the apprehension of shoplifters. Even though they agreed to following the policies during the interview phase when it came to actual practice the company policy went out the door and I had to terminate their services.

            I often heard, "we are law enforcement - we don't need to follow your "6-steps." The problem is when the lawsuits hit the fan, they are working for you in your stores. The only advantage is they have powers of arrest.
            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
            Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

            Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

            Comment


            • #7
              Would you say utilizing Special Police Officers is a wiser choice, as they are employed directly by the company?
              Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

              THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

              Comment


              • #8
                Wow...an officer makes a judgement call in the heat of the moment and everybody's MMQB him. I thought we were supposed to have each other's back. I am so disappointed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In the LP niche that a few of us work, we often have to make that call in the heat of the moment. Failiure to follow policy, or taking somebody when you're not sure they actually have something reaults in a bad stop and ultimately a very nice payout.
                  Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

                  THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Anyone who's been involved in an incident that subsequently got reported in the news media will know how distorted the truth can be - not only because all the parties interviewed try to put the best face on their own actions, but also because a lot of reporters have their own biases that come out in the way they write the story.

                    So if you take everything that people in this story said about what they said and did with a grain of salt, there's still one part of the story that makes me think it's a good bet that the store AND the company that the officer worked for will be paying some money - the statement by the store that essentially "disowns" the officer (not our employee!) and then there's this, which is even more telling:

                    "We regret that the situation....escalated."

                    I don't have much doubt that the "victim" here probably was a lot more obnoxious and/or aggressive, uncooperative etc. than his own account of his actions would have us believe, but when businesses start issuing "apologies" and "regrets", etc., you can say "Ka-ching!"

                    Incidentally, on the other point raised in this thread: Yes, there are lots of potential problems with using off-duty police officers in the private space - both legal and practical problems, to say nothing of the typically higher cost. And often, there really aren't enough advantages to offset the disadvantages. I've posted several times about this before.
                    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-27-2014, 09:29 AM.
                    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wild Dog View Post
                      Wow...an officer makes a judgement call in the heat of the moment and everybody's MMQB him. I thought we were supposed to have each other's back. I am so disappointed.
                      OK, let's, just for arguments sake, say the article is what happened. If the security officer was in the wrong, do you mean you would support him, even if he is completely wrong?

                      You have, in the past, posted some venomous stuff here on the forums. You even admitted to "drunk posting" and you disappeared for awhile. Then you posted this and I had to close the thread as I'm convinced you posted as you are only fishing for arguments. I gave you a warning - keep it up and you will be gone for good.
                      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Its a stolen card case (allegedly), and a very murky area to be involved with on our end. There are so many factors amd probable explanations for someone else using another persons card, I wouldn't touch it. I don't doubt that the customers behavior amounted to disorderly as I'd be pretty pissed myself if I was accuses or denied service because of an allegation. Still shouldn't have happened in the firat place IMO.

                        What I dont get is if they had a question about the card, why not ask for ID?
                        Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

                        THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are many retailers who have their LP departments work credit card cases.
                          Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                          Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                          Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I wont go into specifics, but im very comfortable with our policy regarding it. I would love to see the CCTV as well as incident report from this.
                            Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

                            THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
                              OK, let's, just for arguments sake, say the article is what happened. If the security officer was in the wrong, do you mean you would support him, even if he is completely wrong?

                              You have, in the past, posted some venomous stuff here on the forums. You even admitted to "drunk posting" and you disappeared for awhile. Then you posted this and I had to close the thread as I'm convinced you posted as you are only fishing for arguments. I gave you a warning - keep it up and you will be gone for good.
                              All I'm saying is that we get second guessed by the media, lawyers, police, public, that we shouldn't be jumping on each other's case but defending each from those on the outside.

                              Comment

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