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How do guards legally and correctly toss out dirt balls without collecting

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  • How do guards legally and correctly toss out dirt balls without collecting

    lawsuits for 'discrimination'? While "homeless" not a protected class enough are non-White and I'm not sure if 'generally crazy' is protected but might be.

    I hate those situations where management knows you know who is 'bad' but they don't want to make the 'calls' since that is 'stepping in it'.

    Typical ad, for downtown SF(bum capital of the western world)

    "Job Duties:
    -Deter shoplifting of client property
    -Maintain a physical presence to deter crime
    -Maintain the safety and security of customers and employees
    -Escort loiterers, homeless, and violators of client policy from the premises"

    OK, we all know "homeless"(or at least a certain type of homeless) when we see it but I'd have a hard time codifying it.

    Working in construction or auto repair you can have very 'soiled' clothing but everyone knows you aren't 'homeless' so it is perfectly OK unless "dress code" night club.

    Are guards and other retail employees fully allowed to 'pick on' homeless and bar them from entering stores and malls? I don't think I've seem homeless at any malls in bathrooms etc.

  • #2
    Articulation...if you were a true professional you would know this. You would also know all the bs policies of your work place that may not be enforced 24/7 but come in handy for times when you have someone who needs to go.
    Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

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    • #3
      Just because they are dirty, doesn't mean you can bar them. You really need to find a job that matches your skill level. I fear that the security field is a bit much for you. Perhaps landscaping??? Fast food???

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      • #4
        Its easy. I don't like you I tell you to leave. You tell me no. I have you Baker Acted and involuntarily committed because of your irrational behavior

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        • #5
          Not sure what state you're in, but here in California a private business owner has "the right to refuse service to anyone." While a business is open to the general public (which is why they have to be compliant with fire codes, handicap access, etc.) they are still a private and not a public entity, hence they have the right to enforce rules and regulations that may differ from city and state ordinances (dress code, for instance).

          It is not a violation of city/state/federal law for a store employee (loss prevention) to evict anyone from their business (private property) however, because you can take someone to court (civil matter, not legal) for nothing more than looking at you cross-eyed, loss prevention typically follows a set of protocols and procedures prior to and eviction/arrest so that they can articulate the reasoning behind their actions in court and prove that they removed said person for a legitimate reason (interfering with normal business operations, creating an uncomfortable/hostile work environment, making customers/employees uncomfortable, etc.).

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          • #6
            I agree with what's been already said though some of you are nice and blunt, LOL I can see I am going to enjoy this forum. I'm pretty blunt myself, I find it makes it easier to understand where I am coming from. At my last job I was the supervisor for a private security company, the property I worked had a transient problem, when the weather was nice. It's pretty easy to know how to deal with the undesirables if you know the policies of the company you work for and/or the contracted facilities policies. One easy way to look at it, Does the person have business at the location, I.E.; are they making a purchase, or an employee, etc. If not, I went and introduced myself. most of the time, they know they don't belong there and it didn't take any more than that. if it did, They are on private property, and it's as simple as that.

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            • #7
              Yeah, but when I worked downtown they knew all the angles. Fast food joint? They buy the cheapest item on the menu or get a free ice water and "Bam" - they are now a customer.

              Squid's management may be confused (it happens with too many supervisors with too much time, I'm guessing). On the one hand, they don't want to ruin Mrs. Thurston Howell the Third's shopping experience; on the other hand, Security constantly escorting people out also creates an "uncomfortable" shopping experience. More often than not when I escorted one out (no matter how nice I was), some do gooder co-ed (think Britta on "Community") would be all up in my grille for engaging in "class warfare", being "the man", or whatever else they could think of.

              You have to get a feel for what management (yours and the client's) want and do that. I was actually told to leave one homeless woman alone no matter what (guess who got to clean up the mess when said woman ate too much spicy food)? Long story, but I agreed to it in the end - actually got to the point where I said good morning to her when I worked; for as much as she could (being mentally ill and all) she actually didn't give me any trouble on my shift.

              And so goes the bizarre world of private security...

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              • #8
                We get tons of junkies that come In and play zombie. Nodding at the fragrance counter sorry in cosmetics almost falling over or into people. We also have the mentally ill who will come in shouting out as they stand in one spot. The junk bombs are easy to deal with, we usually send one or two guys over and ask if they need some air which usually has them leaving on their own. The mentally ill are left alone until they begin bothering customers. It's a PITA, because we can't kick anyone out unless a manager says so. Usually we'll send a manager and one of our guys over and the problem sorts itself out.
                Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

                THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                Comment

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