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Quick, Quiet Robbery Nets $60000 at a Whole Foods

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  • Quick, Quiet Robbery Nets $60000 at a Whole Foods

    I was contacted the other day by a New York Times reporter and asked for comment on a $60,000 Whole Foods robbery in New York City (lower Manhattan). It appears that the robbery took place in the store while pushing, in a shopping cart, $60,000 in cash towards the elevator in the back. The robbery took place before 10PM when the store was open and there was an unarmed security guard present when the robbery took place.

    Here's a link to the article. What do you think?




    Quick, Quiet Robbery Nets $60000 at a Whole Foods

    By J. DAVID GOODMAN and MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ

    Published: October 22, 2013

    Past the colorful arrays of pumpkins and artisanal cheese, up the stairs and down the vitamin aisle, a gunman and his accomplice stalked through a Whole Foods in Lower Manhattan on Sunday night.

    They waited by a second-floor elevator, the police said on Tuesday, apparently aware of who — and what — would arrive there momentarily: a manager, an unarmed security guard and a shopping cart with roughly $60,000 in cash
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

  • #2
    I worked at a grocery store way back in the day and we did around $100k in cash a day. The cash office was near the registers and if a register had over a certain dollar amount a supervisor would have to pull the money. It was sealed in a plastic bag and dropped into a drop safe. One register at a time. At night, all the cash was pulled except from two registers.

    $60k in a cart to the back of store? Sounds like either a lazy mgr or inside job.

    Did you see the last line? The reporter could enter the back of house area easily. I bet the store has high shrink.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with it may be an inside job. That means it would be the usual practice to money money like that during open store hours. Very bad practice.

      In grocery, I think all safes should be in the front of the store, near the registers and never in offices. That really reduces the chance for robbery.
      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

      Comment


      • #4
        I wonder if that method of transporting the cash was an isolated store policy or company wide, and just whose bright idea it was.

        +1 on someone being involved, I couldn't imagine having an unarmed escort for that much cash.
        Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

        THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

        Comment


        • #5
          I can't believe they did this while the store was open. I think it is their usual procedure as the office is on the second floor and the robbers were at the elevator to greet them.

          I'm thinking this was supposed to be done after closing and someone was wanting to get out of the store early.
          Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
          Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

          Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
            I can't believe they did this while the store was open. I think it is their usual procedure as the office is on the second floor and the robbers were at the elevator to greet them.

            I'm thinking this was supposed to be done after closing and someone was wanting to get out of the store early.
            Now THAT makes sense. But it does make ya wonderbhow many times tte cashout was rushed like this. The fact they waited for them leads me to believe one of the people moving it was in, rather than another DE.
            Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

            THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

            Comment


            • #7
              Still no update to this as far as I can tell. Hopfully they've changed that practice.
              Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

              THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

              Comment


              • #8
                probably a 'sideways' job, rather than 'inside'.

                To me "inside" means actual employee doing the crime.

                Much more likely it was a friend of an employee, or even friend of a friend who got the actionable info. My guess is at least 30 employees were well aware of the unsafe cash transport SOP. It is a big daily topic how much a store 'grossed' and how much was cash, check and credit(supposedly means diff sorts of shoppers).

                Supermarket I worked at had safe up front in full view through windows. They were robbed (gun, IIRC) by a dumb employee who was TOTALLY IDed by other employees from voice, walk, etc. Pathetic. Dude, you have worked along side all these folks for 3 yrs, a simple mask aint gonna fool them ALL.

                Safe had 'drop' that only opened for armored car guy. Store policy was very strict about amount of cash allowed out in registrars/top of safe. We had a couple of gun nuts in management/senior clerks and they would always 'disappear' somewhere just before armored car arrived as some kind of 'back up'.

                Also very strict about back loading dock door. At least two employees including one management had to be present and inside a painted zone under threat of instant termination(and loss of yearly bonus for management employee). Word was this had happened at other store in chain (the firings).

                Corp. security had their own 'back door' which they could enter without even store manager knowing, and climb up to one way observation posts. With telescopes they could monitor exactly what any particular clerk was doing.

                Whole operation seemed pretty 'first class' compared to today. IIRC clerks were making over $15/hr in 1982, plus Union benefits. I think that is about what they earn today, with less benefits. OUCH! That was just before the Union took a big hit.

                Comment

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