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  • Is bag ban leading to more shoplifting?

    Austin, Tx has passed a law banning shopping bags. A shopper must now bring their own bags to stores.


    After three months of the bag ban in Austin some believe that it has made it easier for thieves to shoplift from stores.
    A woman was arrested in Pflugerville for shoplifting, allegedly used reusable shopping bags and one of her children.


    If reusable bags can make it easier for people to steal items in a city where there is no bag ban, could it be happening more often here in Austin?


    Police reports show 33 year-old Demetra Arnold was arrested for attempting to steal from a Pflugerville HEB while she was with four of her children.
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

  • #2
    I was thinking about that, but I'm also worried about food and other health risks.

    Now we got all sorts of dumbasses hauling their less than clean bags all over stores that were sitting on their dirty counter where their cats climb all over after using litter box.

    Comment


    • #3
      My wife uses her own bags when she shops and she doesn't feel the need to shoplift. I think shoplifters are going to steal no matter what. We used to have shoplifters steal the large bags from the register when they walked into the store, then fill them with merchandise and walk out the door. when we stopped them the would say, "look, it's in y'all's bags," and think we would let them go.
      www.nhmonitoring.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm an LP mgr in Austin, and the bag ban is making things much more difficult, especially in one of my stores which is right next door to a grocery store. Picture nearly everyone who walks in my store is now carrying large shoplifting bags with them; both men and women. Definitely makes it much harder to pick out who you need to pay close attention to.

        Comment


        • #5
          Receipt "check point" station parked right in front of the exits. Just a thought.

          Pops..
          Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

          Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

          Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

          Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


          flat out cool..

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pop pop View Post
            Receipt "check point" station parked right in front of the exits. Just a thought.

            Pops..
            I'm interested in learning how you would operate that 'check point" system. Unless you are a customer contract retailer like Sam's Club, BJ's or Costco you have no authority to enforce such an action.
            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
            Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

            Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
              I'm interested in learning how you would operate that 'check point" system. Unless you are a customer contract retailer like Sam's Club, BJ's or Costco you have no authority to enforce such an action.
              Exactly where I shop, lol. I don't know too about retail Curtis, it was just a thought. I guess, maybe a heavy command presents, higher visibility officers on the floor and eye's on every square inch of the front and back end of the store..


              Retail is not my bag, lol.

              Pops..
              Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

              Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

              Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

              Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


              flat out cool..

              Comment


              • #8
                The problem is there is no state laws anywhere that says a retailer can stop and check receipts and/or bag contents except some states allow for a bag receipt inspection only when a EAS alarm is activated and a customer is asked to produce a receipt.

                Making customers comply with a bag check sets the store up for some very serious conformation issues and in some areas this is akin to impeding a customer and could be interpreted as simple assault if there is any touching involved.

                I never recommend mandatory bag checks to my clients as they cause more problems than they are worth and here are a whole set of issues when you conduct random checks and don't check every single customer exiting the store.

                It's just not worth it. Now I suspect what I have written here will a topic of discussion some day when I'm on the witness stand, but I'll have no problem defending it.
                Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
                  The problem is there is no state laws anywhere that says a retailer can stop and check receipts and/or bag contents except some states allow for a bag receipt inspection only when a EAS alarm is activated and a customer is asked to produce a receipt.

                  Making customers comply with a bag check sets the store up for some very serious conformation issues and in some areas this is akin to impeding a customer and could be interpreted as simple assault if there is any touching involved.

                  I never recommend mandatory bag checks to my clients as they cause more problems than they are worth and here are a whole set of issues when you conduct random checks and don't check every single customer exiting the store.

                  It's just not worth it. Now I suspect what I have written here will a topic of discussion some day when I'm on the witness stand, but I'll have no problem defending it.
                  Spoken like a TRUE professional, I understand completely. Thank you
                  Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

                  Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

                  Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

                  Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


                  flat out cool..

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
                    The problem is there is no state laws anywhere that says a retailer can stop and check receipts and/or bag contents except some states allow for a bag receipt inspection only when a EAS alarm is activated and a customer is asked to produce a receipt.

                    Making customers comply with a bag check sets the store up for some very serious conformation issues and in some areas this is akin to impeding a customer and could be interpreted as simple assault if there is any touching involved.

                    I never recommend mandatory bag checks to my clients as they cause more problems than they are worth and here are a whole set of issues when you conduct random checks and don't check every single customer exiting the store.

                    It's just not worth it. Now I suspect what I have written here will a topic of discussion some day when I'm on the witness stand, but I'll have no problem defending it.
                    Just a thought, if I had to work for the best on the highest levels concerning a big front end retail shop.

                    Other then what I have already said, what would be your assessment? which includes a (high PTZ Cameras and high tech screens inside the hammer room. And the back end of the shop. What else can we do inside the the law? and I guess all L/P agents/officers should become smart lawyers and know the laws. With all do respect, I'll take a free class anytime, I am never too old to learn, lol. I'm only learning retail with you guys who are the best at what you do.

                    thank you Sir.
                    PS- when I work with the teams from first class hotels, some are called L/P officers, others are called Security Officers.


                    Pops..
                    Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

                    Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

                    Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

                    Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


                    flat out cool..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think a combination of LP staff in a uniform of sorts and plainclothes is a good idea. The Broadway was among the first, if not the first, major retailer to do this. The majority of retail theft continues to be committed by opportunists and I think the presence of identifiable LP staff helps as a deterrent.

                      As for the difference in calling LP staff by different terms this is an age old issue that basically stems from retail LP not wanting to be called "Security Guard". That is why the book, "retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention" is titled like it is.

                      In the end, the effectiveness of a retailer's LP program is in the hands of their staff. You can have the best programs and the most effective polices in the industry and if you don't have properly trained staff that follows your program to a T you stand to lose millions. I've seen firsthand retailers lose BIG money when just one LP officer didn't follow policy.
                      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                      Comment

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