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‘Loss Prevention’ Isn’t About Saving Your Job

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  • ‘Loss Prevention’ Isn’t About Saving Your Job

    This is interesting.

    Posted May 2, 2013 in Crime Labor and Employment by Michele Bowman

    From Lawyers.com

    Things can change fast at your job, but one thing hasn’t changed much over the years: employers’ use of “loss prevention” strategies to monitor, prevent, and punish internal theft and fraud. If your employer’s loss prevention department or rep comes knocking, there are some time-tested ways for employees to respond.

    Read more...
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

  • #2
    I read the comments at the bottom and found the entire thing quite commical. For years people assert their right to no talk to law enforcement, security and LP. She is regurgitating the usual trash.

    Where I work, if you talk, we can work things out in house (usually) and fire you. If you don't, we go through the courts and fire you. Which is better for employee?

    Retailers generally don't prosecute employees unless in extreme circumstances.

    Comment


    • #3
      An in-house S.O. told me about a distribution center employee that was being watched because they
      thought he was stealing. The employees area was covered by MULTIPLE cameras. Part of the operation
      had a S.O. hidden in a closet-type area near a restroom. The suspect employee was apparently stashing
      product in a restroom receptacle for pickup later. The guy hidden near the restroom was supposed to
      periodically check the restroom after the employee left. My in-house coworker told me he thought
      the investigation lasted 6 weeks or more. As it turns out one day the employee came to work and
      at the end of the workday put on a NEW pair of the retailers shoes. The employee was confronted
      and a lot of product was found in his car.

      After being told the story I asked "why did they take so long to confront the employee" he said
      a Vice President want to have a felony charge(I guess a minor charge was not enough).

      It sure did not make sense to me to run the OP this way? ...issue being the cost of the operation
      vs. how much in value was actually recovered.

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree, way to long. No need to let it run on.
        Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
        Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

        Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

        Comment


        • #5
          From my experience, there is a greater chance to get some sort of restitution in a felony case. Most misdemenor larceny cases end before they even get to court. The defendant usually takes a plea and gets some community service.
          www.nhmonitoring.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bababouy View Post
            From my experience, there is a greater chance to get some sort of restitution in a felony case. Most misdemenor larceny cases end before they even get to court. The defendant usually takes a plea and gets some community service.
            Makes sense to me now why it took so long and they had camera evidence. It's not like the person was getting
            a lot of merchandise per day; we are talking second class jewelry and I believe 3 pairs of shoes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by capurato View Post
              I read the comments at the bottom and found the entire thing quite commical. For years people assert their right to no talk to law enforcement, security and LP. She is regurgitating the usual trash.

              Where I work, if you talk, we can work things out in house (usually) and fire you. If you don't, we go through the courts and fire you. Which is better for employee?

              Retailers generally don't prosecute employees unless in extreme circumstances.
              "Retailers generally don't prosecute employees unless in extreme circumstances."

              I'd would have to agree with you....

              At 0700 in the morning of a third shift I was asked by my Supervisor "When you checked
              the north side restrooms on your tour did you find anything?" I told him I did not find
              anything unusual. Afterward I realized that I have done a camera surveillance of that
              same area (but other side of bldg.) for the second shift Supervisor about a week before.
              The outcome was a certain employee ALWAYS when using the restroom took 15 minutes.
              The info. was reported. The day after I realized that the employee (that always taking
              about 15 mins.) was now using the restroom that my Supervisor had questioned me about.
              Because we have full coverage of cameras I was able to see the arrival of PD at the Security
              Managers office; I wondered what was going on. Later my Supervisor
              shared with me the fact that PD was there because "an employee found a white powder on
              top of the paper towel dispenser in a restroom". My Supervisor also said the company
              decided not to go ahead with the investigation about the "white powder".

              Comment


              • #8
                At it again.

                http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahl...t-you-to-know/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Makes sense, if you are going to be fired why give them anything that might help them get something that will 'stick' on a real record like conviction.

                  I'm not buying that talking to LP and 'working things out' make is less likely to get a conviction, because if you clam up a conviction is gonna be more work and cost them some real time and effort, and risk on their part. Old saying is "when you go to court you stick you head in the lion's mouth".

                  I knew an LP guy who did an arrest on a young woman but it turns out she had rich uncle who hired real lawyer who put some real effort into spinning and smearing everyone involved. Like a rape victim cross by defense, 4x. IIRC HE was soon "released" amid major re-work of LP arrest policy. Probably something to do with countless hours all store employees had to spend in depositions and waiting at court to be witnesses, and how THEY later filed w/Labor Board on the theory those were "work hours".

                  So I'd say the correct policy is "clam up" and let them sweat. They don't know who on staff might also be involved that they don't know about, or what "protected class/hostile work environment" shight-storm you might come back with, etc.

                  I knew a kid who got fired from auto parts store for stealing parts....on the "orders" of the assistant manager who stayed on.

                  The last thing you want to tell LP is "I did it, no one else involved, I was otherwise a happy employee with no other pending issues against this company...just sort of a 'bad person'". Telling them the "otherwise happy" takes away any real danger to company, and now you are boxed in to be a trophy-conviction for regional LP guy. Your confession makes it slam dunk for the cop who shows up, and brownie point for him.

                  My guess is you clam up and say you will talk after you "get some advise" and the company will also "take a moment" and then issue you a rounded up paycheck for any hours and "drop you from schedule" in very non-committal way, and be scared to give you bad reference, just the dates you worked.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Right, I agree with everyone else.

                    You sit down with your in house LP security and work it out, at which point you get fired and it's done. Why drag it out?
                    Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

                    Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

                    Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

                    Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


                    flat out cool..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      why "drag it out"??? ask any defense lawyer. Cases age "like fine wine".

                      As I stated, once you give them a confession, I'd be very fearful someone in LP or responding officer is gonna look at that as "meat on the table" and slam dunk CRIMINAL CONVICTION. Yes, the cops and DA get Brownie Points for each conviction.

                      Not gonna cost LP or store much once cops have a confession.

                      Then you got MAJOR black mark on your record that will pop up across the civilized world for the next 15 years. Buddy of mine being investigated for custody case had $1.79 high school shop lifting case from 14yrs back pop up.

                      I'm pretty sure "working it out with LP" wont be any quicker than clamming up and telling them you want to check with your lawyer.


                      Unless you got like $10K in severance at stake, no reason to risk giving yourself a real conviction.


                      Don't feel too bad, the store probably "steals" from employees all the time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I know from personal experiences working at the mall that if you confess, and you are able to get the money that you stole or whatever, back to the store, they will simply fire you and that will be that. Otherwise, they would often call the police they would get arrested, where the court will decide whether they are guilty or not, and either way they will lose their jobs.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Armored Car Co. Caught Stealing

                          I actually saw this youtube video by a guy named "TheOl" and it talked about his time working as an armored car guard. He had this one incident where a vault employee was seen on surveillance stuffing money into his socks and throwing what didn't fit into the trashcan. Well the supervisors, caught him and told him that they would just have him blacklisted if he gave them the money back, but he had somehow spent around $10,000 gambling and lost all the money. Well they called the cops and he got arrested.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Walmart..

                            Originally posted by GuardSecSSCS View Post
                            I know from personal experiences working at the mall that if you confess, and you are able to get the money that you stole or whatever, back to the store, they will simply fire you and that will be that. Otherwise, they would often call the police they would get arrested, where the court will decide whether they are guilty or not, and either way they will lose their jobs.
                            I've had the chance to talk with the supervisor and lead LP officer about their jobs and they told me once that when they have a take down, they want full restitution or they will charge the perp to the fullest extent of the law. I never thought about it before but they must know judge and local prosecutor on a first name basis because at our super store their is many of shop lifters..


                            I was reading our local police blotter for our county and there they we're, busted for shop lifting over and over again.
                            Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

                            Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

                            Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

                            Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


                            flat out cool..

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pop pop View Post
                              I've had the chance to talk with the supervisor and lead LP officer about their jobs and they told me once that when they have a take down, they want full restitution or they will charge the perp to the fullest extent of the law. I never thought about it before but they must know judge and local prosecutor on a first name basis because at our super store their is many of shop lifters..


                              I was reading our local police blotter for our county and there they we're, busted for shop lifting over and over again.
                              I suppose it depends on the store, but I know for most chain retailers unless the merchandise is damaged, they just keep the merchandise that was about to be stolen and let the shoplifter go after signing a statement admitting they shoplifted and never coming to the store again. I personally would rather see them in jail, but it's up to the companies to decide for themselves.
                              Last edited by GuardSecSSCS; 07-26-2013, 02:51 PM.

                              Comment

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