Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New to the site from FLA

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New to the site from FLA

    Hello all,

    I was surfing the 'net looking for some useful tips on how to handle drunken college kids when I landed upon this website. How wonderful!! I had no idea there was such a gathering place for those of us working in the security industry! It's WONDERFUL to meet you all!

    I'm fairly new to the security arena myself, just got my license ("D") in July, and going to finally put it to good use! I just landed a position as a Campus Security Officer for one of our fine institutions of higher learning down here in Florida.

    It's not an armed position, so I won't be able to defend myself via that method. Does anyone have any tips on how to handle drunken college kids? I'm pretty good at communication, so I'll be looking to defuse any potential problems with words (and a good dose of psychology). I've heard about this "Verbal Judo", and was wondering if anyone would recommend picking up one of the books on the subject? I remember this being discussed somewhat in my "D" training class, but it wasn't really covered in depth.

    Or, does anyone have any firsthand knowledge on how to deal with intoxicated kids? BTW, I'm female, so I think that verbally is the only way I'll be able to do battle with a noncompliant frat brat....

    Shell
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

  • #2
    Being a female will help you in those incidents. The mom factor comes into play.

    When speaking to someone who is drunk and/or high there are four things to remember:

    1. Speak s...l...o...w...l...y
    2. Speak clearly
    3. Give simple, easily understood commands
    4. Give time for the person to comply. It may take a few seconds for your point to get through an alcohol and/or drug soaked brain, so the person may not be intentionally non-compliant.

    I was a college police sergeant for three years, so I understand what you are going through. A university/college campus is a unique environment to practice law enforcement, but you will have a blast doing it!

    Any training you can get in communication skills will be the most valuable in your career. Verbal Judo is an excellent start, but it has some limitations. See if the school you work for offers any communication classes. I assume you can take classes there for no charge? Also check with your local police academy. I am sure they will offer such classes, maybe called Tactical Communications or the like, you can attend. When working in an educational environment the most powerful tool at your disposal will be your mouth!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by histfan71
      Being a female will help you in those incidents. The mom factor comes into play.

      When speaking to someone who is drunk and/or high there are four things to remember:

      1. Speak s...l...o...w...l...y
      2. Speak clearly
      3. Give simple, easily understood commands
      4. Give time for the person to comply. It may take a few seconds for your point to get through an alcohol and/or drug soaked brain, so the person may not be intentionally non-compliant.

      I was a college police sergeant for three years, so I understand what you are going through. A university/college campus is a unique environment to practice law enforcement, but you will have a blast doing it!

      Any training you can get in communication skills will be the most valuable in your career. Verbal Judo is an excellent start, but it has some limitations. See if the school you work for offers any communication classes. I assume you can take classes there for no charge? Also check with your local police academy. I am sure they will offer such classes, maybe called Tactical Communications or the like, you can attend. When working in an educational environment the most powerful tool at your disposal will be your mouth!
      When we put forth the effort as described so eloquently by histfan71, we will gain the respect and admiration of the courts, the community, our fellows, and those we must arrest and/or detain.
      Enjoy the day,
      Bill

      Comment


      • #4
        Howdy

        Hi MensaCat,

        Well, I've never worked college security, but I was a drunken college student ... and I've worked nothing but security and law enforcement since I graduated. Perhaps that combination counts for something.

        I'm full time nuclear security in the Air Force and part-time night hotel security, where the majority of my job is dealing with intoxicated folks. I'm not armed when doing the hotel work, and I'm not a big guy - 5'7", 145 lbs. Add to that an amiable demeanor, which doesn't seem to change even when a big bunch of knuckles whizzes past my face.

        When the rare confrontation happens, the quiet voice and cool manner has prevailed. There was one situation in which city police department had to be called, but that was due to an assault already in progress. In that case, somebody else got the knuckle sandwich, and my partner had to use only minimal physical restraint to prevent the guy from getting a second helping. In most cases, I'm able to diffuse the situation before anyone gets too hot under the collar. My boss appreciates this, since heated disagreements usually result in property damage.

        I don't think size or gender has much to do with presence. There's a female city patrolman here in my town who's five-foot-nothing, 110 pounds, ten of it shoes. I met her at a tech expo, where she demoed cool cop gadgets next to my Geek Squad booth (I work at Best Buy, too). After talking with her for five minutes I determined that I would be safer locked in a cellar filled with ravenous pit bulls than getting froggy with her during a traffic stop.

        Best to you,

        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by DaveD
          Hi MensaCat,

          Well, I've never worked college security, but I was a drunken college student ... and I've worked nothing but security and law enforcement since I graduated. Perhaps that combination counts for something.

          I'm full time nuclear security in the Air Force and part-time night hotel security, where the majority of my job is dealing with intoxicated folks. I'm not armed when doing the hotel work, and I'm not a big guy - 5'7", 145 lbs. Add to that an amiable demeanor, which doesn't seem to change even when a big bunch of knuckles whizzes past my face.

          When the rare confrontation happens, the quiet voice and cool manner has prevailed. There was one situation in which city police department had to be called, but that was due to an assault already in progress. In that case, somebody else got the knuckle sandwich, and my partner had to use only minimal physical restraint to prevent the guy from getting a second helping. In most cases, I'm able to diffuse the situation before anyone gets too hot under the collar. My boss appreciates this, since heated disagreements usually result in property damage.

          I don't think size or gender has much to do with presence. There's a female city patrolman here in my town who's five-foot-nothing, 110 pounds, ten of it shoes. I met her at a tech expo, where she demoed cool cop gadgets next to my Geek Squad booth (I work at Best Buy, too). After talking with her for five minutes I determined that I would be safer locked in a cellar filled with ravenous pit bulls than getting froggy with her during a traffic stop.

          Best to you,

          Dave
          Dave, believe me, if you were in SAC you know security. Air Force got a jump start from General LeMay.
          Remember the story they told at Air/Security Police Academy about the two-stripper guarding the gate at a SAC base in Florida? General Lemay drove a pickup truck right past him nearly knocking the airman down.
          He took aim at the truck with his .45 and missed the general's head by two inches.
          Lemay got out of the truck and pulled the man's stripes off saying, "That's for missing." The next day he was promoted to then A1C.
          Lemay spent the night at the hospital getting glass fragments pulled from his scalp, neck and upper back.
          I'm sacumcised.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            McDill 6th SF Squadron chased a DUI airman around the base while Tampa Police was chasing the guy, for a little while.

            AIrman tried to make it to McDill. TPD called the main gate, they shut it down - Humvee's with .50 style. The guy stopped, tried to back up, TPD set up a road block, and from what I remember, he got a few feet onto the base before he was classified a threat and shot at by the SF.

            I think we all know what "shot at" means when your trying to kill SF folks. ME's office stopped counting bullet holes in the car.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
              .....
              I think we all know what "shot at" means when your trying to kill SF folks. ME's office stopped counting bullet holes in the car.
              Cause of death: 'Lead' poisoning....
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #8
                "Being a female..."

                Being a female has been a great asset for me in Security. For example...most males aren't gonna take a swing at you most likely...not that they won't, I am just saying that when I approach people at the hospital I work at...say Baker Acts, I just going in and talk as calmly as possible and tell them my first name and ask them familar questions like "where did you grow up, what hobbies do you like, etc" and eventually they themselves calm down.
                I know you wanted to know some tips for dealing with drunk kids and all I can tell you from my experience is be stern and nice at the same time. There have been kids comming into the ER lobby and they sit there in herds...using profanity. I hear them and tell them to knock it off because there are children around, plus no one else wants to hear it and I always tell them that I sure don't want to hear it and if they must talk that way then they can take it outside.And the back up to that is to call the authorities and have them removed if they don't stop. I know some may not agree with me on what I just said and maybe I just stepped on some toes...but it does work for me.

                But just exactly what are the kids doing that you are searching or tips on dealing with them?
                I've been working as a Security Officer for almost 3 years. Worked for Wackenhut as a Custom Protection Officer (CPO) and Securitas where I was a SGT. and Site Supervisor. I am currently employed by Guardsmark. I have worked as security in a hospital dealing with Baker Acts, the Morgue, fire, etc and Beach Resorts dealing with Spring Breakers in Panama City, Florida and even worked as a uniformed Loss Prevention Officer in a major department store using CCTV....

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've just survived my 29th March (Spring) Break working in hotels in downtown Montreal. Unfortunately the only advice I can give on dealing with intoxicated students in practise! And DO NOT take anything a drunk says personally.
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Emase82

                    Ms/Mrs. MensaCat...
                    I am the security director at a small private college in Monmouth Illinois. We are also unarmed and do not have arrest, detention, or restraint powers. In order for you to control such students, there must be a system in place in which negative sanctions can be levied. You cannot have authority and not have power to levy sanctions against offenders. Second, police are always a good deterrent. Inform them that if they do not cooperate with you, they will have to deal with police. Do not bluff! If they don't cooperate, contact police and let them deal with the student. Third, consistency is probably one of the most important aspects of enforcement. Do not use discretion because the student you let go today will tell his friends tomorrow that he got off, and also give them ammunition for appeals (This college has an alcohol appeals board). Another very effective method, if approved by your supervisor, is to take a picture with a camera. This really puts into perspective for the student that "hey, I am in trouble". Lastly, document everything that a drunk student says or does.

                    On another note, do not argue or try to explain to a drunk student why or how they are in trouble. They cannot be reasoned with. Inform them that they are in violation of whatever rules or regulations they are in violation of, and inform them that they will be receiving a citation. Ignore (outwardly) everything they say(inwardly, keep careful track for documentation).

                    This is about all I can help you with, it has proved to be pretty effective here though. Good luck, I know how they can get, so know that you have brothers in the foxhole.
                    Murphy was an optomist.

                    Comment

                    Leaderboard

                    Collapse
                    Working...
                    X