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  • #16
    Originally posted by soontobeLEO
    I went to a class that Securitas held. In the state of Florida, you have to have 40 hours of training before you can get your license. Securitas has you go for 24 hours, then they submit your test to the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. You have to then bring your certificate of completion to Tampa, and pay around $100, and you get the Class D license. I forget the time, but after you get your license, you have to go back and finish the other 16 hours of training. After you complete that 16 hours, you just get recertified every so often. I don't have the specifics memorized, I'm sorry.
    As for the permission to go to sleep. That was a site supervisor, not a Securitas supervisor who did so. The factory I work in is really small. There is also the fact that (1) its located in the middle of nowhere (2) there is nothing but grapefruit to steal basically. Most of the people that work at the factory, including the supervisors, will sleep on shift. They are scheduled 12 hours, and probably only actually work 5 hours of it. Like I said earlier, it is a very rare opportunity. I really lucked out in finding such an easy job. Gives me plenty of time to study for the academy and to just relax. It just sucks not having more action. I am still debating if it is really a dream job or if I'm working in a crappy enviroment, lol. I used to think having a job where you didn't have to do anything would be great, but now that I have it, I feel like I'm failing myself. Don't know how to describe it really.
    DOACS is putting a bill throught o increse the hrs to whatever the specify not a paticular number.
    "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 1stWatch
      ...Just sit there and watch the door for 12 hours...
      It would be a shame if a mirror was placed at an angle in front of that CCTV camera...

      Seriously though, I'd quit that job!
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by bigdog
        just to let you know aleeping on duty is against 493.6118 and can you can get your license pulled,suspended or even brought up on charges .
        violating any section of 493 is a misdemeanor.
        Suprising that a state has those laws. I wish pa would do something like that. Does the law cover s/o leaving his/her post as well?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by hemi444
          Suprising that a state has those laws. I wish pa would do something like that. Does the law cover s/o leaving his/her post as well?
          It does.

          There is also "Criminal Negligence," "Failure to Perform Lawful Duty," and the appropriate civil suit that your employer can file for abandoning post. Sleeping is considered abandonment of post, as you are no longer capable of performing your lawful duty.

          I have been in security for 12 years, 10 of those years with the same company, in Florida. Sufficiet to say, I have no wish to go to Frostproof, Florida. But if I did... Man.

          If someone finds you asleep at your post, your looking at jail time. Securitas will immediately sue you for theft of service, as well, since your stealing from them by not performing your duties. The state will pull your license, and most likely bring up misdemeanor charges against you. No LE agency will touch a sleeping security guard. No one is that stupid.

          Pull out your green "Security Officer's Handbook," and read it. Do nothing that it says you can't do. Police Departments WILL investigate your security job, because they want to know if your a good security guard, a wannabe, or someone who can't even hold a guard's job. The background guys WILL talk to Securitas.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #20
            My son worked for Securatis for awhile at coal mine that had been union but went non-union when new owners took over. Post 1 was across the road from a picket shack with both having video pointed at each other.
            Needless to say they had to do it right.

            At the scene of an MVA involving a coal truck from that site the a guard was taking pics of the scene and writing a report very similar to the one the LE was doing.

            If one of my son's supervisors called the house for something he was very respectful, giving his name and rank etc.

            My impression of them was very good but my son said there were some problems.

            The main reason my son left there was his Father-in_Law to be was a picket captain for the union and didn't want the conflict.

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            • #21
              I'm not aware of any such "no sleeping" laws in Connecticut, and I've never heard or read an account where a s/o was actually brought up on criminal charges for doing so anywhere in the USA (doesn't mean that it hasn't happened though).

              My post is required to monitor a chemical plant. If a guard did fall asleep and injury or loss of life occurred because of a problem at the plant, it is likely that the state would pursue criminal negligence charges against the officer anyhow.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Mr. Security
                I'm not aware of any such "no sleeping" laws in Connecticut, and I've never heard or read an account where a s/o was actually brought up on criminal charges for doing so anywhere in the USA (doesn't mean that it hasn't happened though).

                My post is required to monitor a chemical plant. If a guard did fall asleep and injury or loss of life occurred because of a problem at the plant, it is likely that the state would pursue criminal negligence charges against the officer anyhow.
                We had a guard tested for "intox on duty" by the Tampa Police Department, forwarded the entire thing with PD report (After explaining to them it was a criminal violation), and the guy was brought up on one misdemeanor count. I have no idea what happened AFTER the misdemeanor arrest, he was RORed and told to sleep it off in his car.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                  We had a guard tested for "intox on duty" by the Tampa Police Department, forwarded the entire thing with PD report (After explaining to them it was a criminal violation), and the guy was brought up on one misdemeanor count. I have no idea what happened AFTER the misdemeanor arrest, he was RORed and told to sleep it off in his car.
                  I'm surprised the security company pursued it. Generally, the last thing they want is to have their name in the paper - "bad-press." Other clients may conclude that the company fails to screen its applicants well and they might lose accounts. Usually the company just fires the guard.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mr. Security
                    I'm surprised the security company pursued it. Generally, the last thing they want is to have their name in the paper - "bad-press." Other clients may conclude that the company fails to screen its applicants well and they might lose accounts. Usually the company just fires the guard.
                    The company wanted good press, "See we got rid of this person for not doing his job. You can count on us to do our very best Mr or Mrs Potential Customer."
                    Smart move on the company's part.
                    Enjoy the day,
                    Bill

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security
                      I'm surprised the security company pursued it. Generally, the last thing they want is to have their name in the paper - "bad-press." Other clients may conclude that the company fails to screen its applicants well and they might lose accounts. Usually the company just fires the guard.
                      The owner of this company was a former marine.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        The owner of this company was a former marine.
                        The owner sent that guard to "BOOT" camp, as in booted-out.
                        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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