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  • MartinMc
    replied
    Hello spice HD welcome to the forum

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky
    Maybe they should have a universal color of the rope lights run along the baseboards similar as they use in movie isles to make the isle visible. Like in case of fire follow the green lights and not the red.
    There are 2 stairways in the tower of my downtown hotel. I wanted to use a red SORTIE (Exit) sign on one side & a green SORTIE sign on the other side. In case of an evacuation with a stairway blocked we could announce over the pa which stairway to use. Then I remembered my brother & others are coloured blind. They don't see red or green!

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  • Chucky
    replied
    Maybe they should have a universal color of the rope lights run along the baseboards similar as they use in movie isles to make the isle visible. Like in case of fire follow the green lights and not the red.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky
    Ever wonder if smoke rises then why are the exit signs at ceiling level? Hmmmm
    I have seen them about 2 feet above the floor level in a hospital exactly because of the reason you mention. They'd be vandalized in a very short time in an hotel if they were installed there however.

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  • Crimkeeper1
    replied
    Welcome

    Hello Spice HD and welcome.

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  • Chucky
    replied
    Ever wonder if smoke rises then why are the exit signs at ceiling level? Hmmmm

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  • T202
    replied
    Hi and welcome. Good luck with your endeavors.

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  • SpiceHD
    replied
    most hotels have those fire alarms in every room and in halls. even apartments have them too. its becoming a must for us to have that everywhere cuz even if theres not many deaf people.. there is lot of seniors that might have trouble hearing high pitch sounds of fire alarm (its high pitch right?) so now most major hotels have those plus tty and closed caption etc etc.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Not sure about Canada, but NFPA rules require visual cues for alarm activation, so she should know the fire alarm is going off.
    I used to be a member of the NFPA (too expensive). There "rules" are usually adopted by most north american jurisdictions but not all. We have 2 properties in the US. I've visited one. We do not have visual fire alarms everywhere in the hotel. We do have designated "handicapped rooms" that have strobe lights connected to the fire alarm system.

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  • SpiceHD
    replied
    well i will be getting cochlear implant this tues so ill have some hearing but communication still may be a problem. (if i need to contact cops or fireman no problem i have my own methods and fast one too as well to contact them) but if i have to deal with people in general that would be a problem.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    I could see you easily doing some security jobs. Watching cameras for example. For other jobs I don't think so. We have a deaf lady who works as a Maid here in the hotel. Part of a Maid's job is to direct guests to the emergency exits if she hears the fire alarm. Not being able to hear the alarm means she can not do part of her job. I could see this being a major problem for a deaf person.
    Not sure about Canada, but NFPA rules require visual cues for alarm activation, so she should know the fire alarm is going off.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    I could see you easily doing some security jobs. Watching cameras for example. For other jobs I don't think so. We have a deaf lady who works as a Maid here in the hotel. Part of a Maid's job is to direct guests to the emergency exits if she hears the fire alarm. Not being able to hear the alarm means she can not do part of her job. I could see this being a major problem for a deaf person.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    This poses an interesting question. What is a reasonable accommodation for the job description of "security guard" for a deaf person?

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  • SpiceHD
    started a topic hiya!

    hiya!

    let me introduce myself here... im deaf girl and i m currently a student of a college. i m trying to apply for securitas and a friend of mine suggested me to this forum to learn more about this company. i do not know if i ll be accepted because im deaf but im gonna try

    so yea im not a security officer, guard, etc YET! but hoping will get in heh.

    if u got any questions or suggestions...id welcome them all

    so nice to meet you all.

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