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Hospital and Clinic Security

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  • crankloud
    replied
    policies.

    I am currently trying to post copies of relevant policies and procedures manuals to all forum readers, but have had no success yet. I will keep trying. Someones yahoo address would be alot easier to download these. Thanks. Tony.

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  • aphilpot
    replied
    Originally posted by crankloud
    I am trying to send you a copy of my hospital security policy, just as a guide. The basic policy and principle here is "equal amount of force". That means if someone punches me i can punch them, if they use a baton, i can. Other policies also include "privacy of medical information", "protecting people and property, first aid policies and fire policies, occupational health and safety policies and many more. Keeping up with policies and procedures is not an easy task, that's why most managers have them on hand( just before they repramand you,they do their homework).
    First off, it is great to see a thread on Hospital / Clinic Security. Perhaps this will take off and we can have a new category established?

    Being new around here, most of you don't know me. I am a Manager of Security for a 240 bed hospital facility with an attached 140 bed PCH (Personal Care Home) and a 95 unit "assisted living" complex (unattached but on the same campus). Our facility is not a major trauma center but does come with all the dressings like Psych, Outpatient clinics, a huge Rehab centre as we specialize in Orthopedic surgery like knee and hip replacements.

    Our team is responsible for Physical Security, parking and 1:1 or "constant care" or Mental Health Act patients or intox. patients.

    I have been tasked with reviewing and revising our current policy and procedure manual. This is where I need your help. I wrote the manual two years ago and have added/ammended what I can.

    Is there any other hospital or similiar site managers/supervisors /officers that can send me a copy of their P&P or SOP's to compare notes and see if I am missing anything?

    Hi crankloud - you offered to send to another gent, can I also get a copy of your info?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thank you,

    Alan

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by crankloud
    I am trying to send you a copy of my hospital security policy, just as a guide. The basic policy and principle here is "equal amount of force". That means if someone punches me i can punch them, if they use a baton, i can. Other policies also include "privacy of medical information", "protecting people and property, first aid policies and fire policies, occupational health and safety policies and many more. Keeping up with policies and procedures is not an easy task, that's why most managers have them on hand( just before they repramand you,they do their homework).
    We use the one-plus-one theory in use of force. I can respond one level higher than the force used against me (if the person tries defensive resistence I can use pain compliance techniques to get them to stop). Our use of force policy also dictates use of force reporting, medical attention requirements, authorized equipment and who can carry them, and state law covering use of force, etc... It has become quite lengthy itself.

    Medical information privacy at our hospital can be summed up in one acronym - HIPPA.

    As for the managers only reviewing a policy at reprimand time - ain't it the truth. Our Director of Security doesn't keep our policies current, one of the Supervisors takes that task on and our Director signs off later on them.
    Last edited by aka Bull; 05-17-2006, 02:46 PM. Reason: spelling

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Bill: When I recieve it, I'll pass it on. The guy's a 12 year EMS vet, as well as 10 year LE vet. He's been on SIW and has looked at the stuff you post, and "yelled" at me about "Where did you find this guy?! Why isn't he anywhere I am?!"

    Crankloud, you can send it to me at nacorbier (!at) cityscapesolutions.net

    I can read any file format on the face of the Earth.

    Leave a comment:


  • crankloud
    replied
    policy

    I am trying to send you a copy of my hospital security policy, just as a guide. The basic policy and principle here is "equal amount of force". That means if someone punches me i can punch them, if they use a baton, i can. Other policies also include "privacy of medical information", "protecting people and property, first aid policies and fire policies, occupational health and safety policies and many more. Keeping up with policies and procedures is not an easy task, that's why most managers have them on hand( just before they repramand you,they do their homework).

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Nathan, let him read the guide and TSCM materials I sent you. Lock and padlock the door and bar the windows because he'll try to escape.
    Security is not the clean fun business many laymen believe it to be.
    I made some changes to the guide and will send it after a review.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I like OC, but I'd rather deploy a taser than OC, less contamination.

    I'm not even sure what kind of policy they need. They have nothing. They're operating on cluelessness, as many contract accounts are (They're in-house).

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Hey, folks, I need something for a friend. Can someone appropriate/acquire/beg/borrow/steal enough information to give a clueless hospital director of security (Not the friend) who has no previous experience in security information?.....

    They are not authorized to use force, I was told their force options are "very limited." They are going to recieve training in self-protection, but that's it. They carry handcuffs, but may not carry other weapons.

    They are responsible for executing a physician's hold order, but not for criminal intervention. So, they are required to take patients who have been proscribed restraint down, and they are required to take patients who attempt to "walk-away" down. They do not intervene in criminal issues, however.

    Its a blank slate. This isn't my type of operation........

    I've been asked for a policy. Does anyone have any ideas, help, guidelines, etc for me to draft one? Keeping in mind that the guy giving it to the new director is a LEO, and that the director is clueless.
    What policy or policies are you looking for? Restraining patients (we use RIPP Brand restraints and you have to be qualified to use them), Use of Force (even in self -defense - our officers are trained in the PPCT Defensive Tactics - which I instruct), knife self-defense (PPCT SKD), post orders, etc...

    You might also direct your friend to search around on the International Association of Hospital Safety & Security (IAHSS) website www.iahss.org (don't know how much he could find there but it may be worth a look).

    Give me an idea and I could probably send some of our policies to you for "examples" for your friend. I know from just what you say it's not a hospital I'd work at.

    We (in-house officers) are fully equipped and trained, with annual and bi-annual re-certifications (depending on the skill) required to maintain your qualifications/skills.

    Oh, you forgot the OC - we carry the foam type.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Hey, folks, I need something for a friend. Can someone appropriate/acquire/beg/borrow/steal enough information to give a clueless hospital director of security (Not the friend) who has no previous experience in security information?

    Here's the story.

    I have a friend who is a LEO, and also works for a hospital as a teacher. Since he's a LEO, they're asking him for advice on how to do the Hospital Security thing. It is in the State of Missouri. There are no written policies to be found, and the guards (They're called Guards, not Officers) are there for visual deterrance as much as anyone can figure out.

    They are not authorized to use force, I was told their force options are "very limited." They are going to recieve training in self-protection, but that's it. They carry handcuffs, but may not carry other weapons.

    They are responsible for executing a physician's hold order, but not for criminal intervention. So, they are required to take patients who have been proscribed restraint down, and they are required to take patients who attempt to "walk-away" down. They do not intervene in criminal issues, however.

    Its a blank slate. This isn't my type of operation. You hospital guys know what I'd be putting on them: Tasers, Batons, Flashlights, Gloves, and Cuffs. They'd also be responsible for protecting the ER staff from both patients acting out and violent offenders. Unfortunately, they're not, they're there for visual intimidation only.

    I've been asked for a policy. Does anyone have any ideas, help, guidelines, etc for me to draft one? Keeping in mind that the guy giving it to the new director is a LEO, and that the director is clueless.

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    I worked in-house hospital security for about a year. We did the same thing, drunks and overdoses were treated in the ER until they were well enough to be discharged. We would have to do what they called a "One to One" with the "patient". This meant that we would have to sit in the ER room with them until they sobered up. If they became combative, they were put in restraints and given a "happy shot". It was a big pain in the neck.
    We do the same at our hospital. The "patient" ends up on security watch (we have 2 in-house officers assigned in the ER all the time - and can bring in more if we need to). There are a fair number of fights with them, usually ending in them getting restrained to the bed and occassionally (when they push it far enough) with some of them getting hit with a Taser shot to get control of them. It is a lot of intensive one-on-one time that could best be spent in other work. Oh, and the local detox facility - if the "patient" get there and exhibits so much as a "disagreeable attitude" they send them right back to us to handle as "too hostile for detox".

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  • T202
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    In my city a large majority of people found under the influence of narcotics or alcohol are brought to our hospital emergency department for "treatment". This means (90% of the time) in them being held in the ER until they are "fit" to be sent to the local detox facility (one does not go to the county jail "tank") or released back out on the streets. These people are a large portion of the disrutpive/assaultive behaviorial cases we have to deal with in the ER.

    I was wondering if this is something that happens elsewhere as a general rule or if our city is outside the norm.

    It seems a large waste of effective use of emergency room beds, that's what the detox facility should be doing.
    I worked in-house hospital security for about a year. We did the same thing, drunks and overdoses were treated in the ER until they were well enough to be discharged. We would have to do what they called a "One to One" with the "patient". This meant that we would have to sit in the ER room with them until they sobered up. If they became combative, they were put in restraints and given a "happy shot". It was a big pain in the neck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by GCMC Security
    Here they have to be cleared medically to go to the detox facility. Once they clear medically we call PD to transport them outta here (unless the get Baker Acted which has happened)
    Same here. We have to take the prisoner to the hospital if they test .24% BrAC (or above) and/or appear to be intoxicated on drugs.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    In my city a large majority of people found under the influence of narcotics or alcohol are brought to our hospital emergency department for "treatment". This means (90% of the time) in them being held in the ER until they are "fit" to be sent to the local detox facility (one does not go to the county jail "tank") or released back out on the streets. These people are a large portion of the disrutpive/assaultive behaviorial cases we have to deal with in the ER.

    I was wondering if this is something that happens elsewhere as a general rule or if our city is outside the norm.

    It seems a large waste of effective use of emergency room beds, that's what the detox facility should be doing.
    Here they have to be cleared medically to go to the detox facility. Once they clear medically we call PD to transport them outta here (unless the get Baker Acted which has happened)

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    ER's, drunks and drug users?

    In my city a large majority of people found under the influence of narcotics or alcohol are brought to our hospital emergency department for "treatment". This means (90% of the time) in them being held in the ER until they are "fit" to be sent to the local detox facility (one does not go to the county jail "tank") or released back out on the streets. These people are a large portion of the disrutpive/assaultive behaviorial cases we have to deal with in the ER.

    I was wondering if this is something that happens elsewhere as a general rule or if our city is outside the norm.

    It seems a large waste of effective use of emergency room beds, that's what the detox facility should be doing.

    Leave a comment:


  • crankloud
    replied
    I am sitting in a psych ward as i write this,(not as a patient). Hospital security has it's moments especially psych. We are trained in aggression minimisation and takedown techniques and try to practice these moves whenever possible. I never work alone, i basically stand in between the nurse or magistrate and patient as a human shield and hope for the best. I always remember my stance and to watch for any movement from the patient. I look really paranoid some days, better paranoid than dead.

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