Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cost of Uniforms

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cost of Uniforms

    Hey all, I'm wondering what to do about the uniforms that my guards are going to wear. Do I take the cost of the uniform, badge and patches out of their first paycheck? I curious to know what you guys do. Thanks in advance. Jason

  • #2
    Originally posted by fifibag2 View Post
    Hey all, I'm wondering what to do about the uniforms that my guards are going to wear. Do I take the cost of the uniform, badge and patches out of their first paycheck? I curious to know what you guys do. Thanks in advance. Jason
    Well, that is really up to you and your budget. Each company is different in how they operate in regards to uniforms. It's pretty much like this..

    Company A - Will make you pay for your entire uniform and gear
    Company B - Will make you pay for half of your uniform (pants, boots, belt, etc, and they will provide the shirt, badge)
    Company C - Will make you put a deposit down on the uniform (which will be refunded if you leave the company). Some will take it on the first check, others will take a certain amount per check.
    Company D - Will provide the uniform free of charge, with the understanding of being charged with theft if the uniform is not returned. Some companies are serious about this, some other don't enforce it.

    So, really it's up to you and how you feel. Personally, the whole "free" uniform is a nice perk, especially if you're not paying too much ($8-$9) an hour.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Comment


    • #3
      Many guards will not pay for their uniform. They will pay a uniform upkeep fee, a uniform deposit fee, but they will not pay for the uniform itself.

      I do not recommend giving your patches out. The guy you terminate one day may be back in the uniform he paid for (You cannot keep it, he paid for it) to cause trouble on your property next day.

      Factor your uniform costs into your bill rate. Honestly, if you're making the guards buy complete uniforms, you're not going to get quality guards.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        This is the way we do it here.

        Your first alotment of uniforms is as follows

        4 pants
        4 short sleeved shirts
        4 long sleeved shirts
        1 coat
        1 fur trooper hat
        2 clip on ties
        1 badge

        Each year you get to get up to year 5
        2 shirts your choice of length
        2 pants
        1 tie

        After 5 years of service you get a yearly credit at the uniform shop to purchase anything you want.

        Officers must supply their own boots, belts, and duty gear (Handcuffs, flashlights, guns, and all pouches), minus the baton, baton scabbard and gun holster (this part is new).
        "You gotta look like Rico Suave, Think like Einstein and, only if that fails...fight like Tyson." -Dougo83's FTO

        Me- "Should we call the police?" My FTO- "Justin, here, we are the police. Go get em."

        Originally posted by Black Caesar
        some people just need killin!!!!! (Or Tasing, or pepper spraying or whatever).

        Comment


        • #5
          You are in California. I do not believe it is legal for you to charge for the uniform. I will check labor laws but my understanding is that if you want them to wear a specific uniform (ie this shirt, these pants, this jacket) you must provide it. If you simply say blue shirt, black pants, then the employee can pay for it, but it can be any blue shirt and any black pants, in good condition, the employee wishes. Now being that security uniforms are regulated it must be a specific shirt and pants therefore you must provide it. Some companies will do a refundable deposit, although most do not, at least not in the Sacramento area. And what was said about quality people will not pay for uniforms, you better believe it.
          "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

          Comment


          • #6
            I believe it is FEDERAL law that if you require your employees to wear a uniform you HAVE to provide it. The place I work part time for now did charge me $50 for a deposit in case I didn't turn something back in. My law enforcement uniforms, of course, were free Replacement issue is twice a year.

            Comment


            • #7
              It may be federal. I have been looking at the California codes trying to find it and have so far been unable to. I have heard this from many employers over the years.
              "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

              Comment


              • #8
                Uniform Costs

                In NSW it is illegal for an employer to charge an employee for a compulsory uniform. Most security companies for full time - 2 days + 2 nights is 4 shirts and 2 trousers + jacket, coat and other uniform items. I have worked for some companies who will ask you to work further days and give you only 3 shirts and you work 6 days straight (casual employment is rife).

                I made all my staff pay a uniform deposit of $250 US as some of the items were big dollars and much wanted by other company staff (leather jackets with cut-aways for guns / cuffs were $450 US so were issued to managers and senior staff ONLY). Boots / belts were personal choice as we caps (we supplied generic black ones for the staff to keep and personal kit was at the discretion of the staff involved.

                Apart from a few ties being lost, most staff got their $250 US deposit back when they moved on or were moved on by me.
                "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                Comment


                • #9
                  A few disjointed notes (hey, free internet advice ain't pretty ), some of which have already been said:

                  1. If you expect the guards to pay (or leave a deposit) for uniforms, you're going to lose out on people who aren't willing or can't afford to make such a payment.

                  2. If you hand out free uniforms, expect that in a few cases people will work one or two shifts then disappear, and you won't ever see the uniforms again (yes, you can sue/press charges, but it often isn't cost-effective to do so).

                  3. Expecting guards to pay for their own uniforms is rather demoralizing and contributes to people not taking their job seriously.

                  4. If the guards have to pay for their own uniforms they'll likely keep using them until they eventually fall apart, regardless of how many pounds the guard has gained/lost or what's been spilled on them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    True but alot of companies do not supplied correct uniforms for their staff - they provide a shirt and tie and that is it. You are expected to provide your own black trousers which rate from tailored business style, black jeans or MC Hammer size with the compulsory white socks showing.

                    I know if I was buying a replacement uniform for a senior officer for my now defunct company, I would be up for $1500 US and if you had 10 staff of that nature you would be spending alot of dollars in clothes - hence why I asked for the deposits (espeically on the jackets and leather coats). No-one complained about it as it was $XX per pay until paid off.
                    "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My .02
                      When I worked corporate security all officers in my department were issued free 4 shirts, 4 pants, a windbreaker, badge, and nameplate. They signed a Theft by conversion form (law might be Fl only) and thier uniform replacement issues were closely monitored. The only time an officer was charged for a uniform is if it was obvious neglect. Use of force tools (baton, pepper spray w/holsters) were post equipment accounted for at the beginning and end of each shift.
                      Shoes and trouser belts were officer responsibilities.

                      I did have an emergency response team that provided thier own sidearms, duty belts and holsters. But they were paid 1.00/hr more all year and then thier overtime rate when deployed so that worked out for them nicely during the busy hurricane season from a few years ago.

                      The EP team we set up was bought suits but the cost was prorated until a certain date. X amount of the cost was deducted each month until the cost of the suits reached 0.00. We did have to deduct final funds from one operator who abruptly quit. Fortunatly he signed the contract authorizing it so he went away quietly after challenging it at first.

                      YMMV but I had good success in issuing uniforms to line officerrs and making them accountable, and paying for the higher end (Suits) items and also making them accountable.

                      Those items that the officers procured on thier own were done with incentives like getting with, for instance, a gunshop and getting them to offer a discount if the officer purchased his sidearm from them.

                      I hope my rambling has helped a little

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have worked for seven different security outfits over the years and have never had to pay for uniforms or uniform gear.

                        I would look at a company that made their officers provide their own uniforms as a cut rate outfit not worth working at.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think its cultural, as well.

                          Down in Florida, duty rigs are bought by individual guards. With some police departments as well, you bought your sidearm, ASP, and boots.

                          Anyone know of a Tampa Bay agency that gives you a full duty rig with sidearm? Give as in, "You are not paying for this, nothing out of your check, etc."
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                            I think its cultural, as well.

                            Down in Florida, duty rigs are bought by individual guards. With some police departments as well, you bought your sidearm, ASP, and boots.

                            Anyone know of a Tampa Bay agency that gives you a full duty rig with sidearm? Give as in, "You are not paying for this, nothing out of your check, etc."
                            The Only one I can think of is Wackenhut but I think that doesn't include less than lethal items.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't think employees buying their own uniforms is a bad thing. I know that when I joined the military I had to pay for my 1st uniform issue (they took $250 out of my 1st paycheck). I also know that the city I live in makes their new officers buy their 1st uniforms, vests, boots, and if they don't have a matching duty belt (ie all the same brand and finish) they have to wear an issued leather belt.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X