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Corporate Key Control Policy

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Thanks Bill. I knew you would know.
    Mr. Security, when you have your tender parts pinched, you learn fast. I missed it on one of my government surveys because I took the building manager's word for it instead of checking with the local fire marshal. And when a federal judge who, by the way is appointed for life as in forever, jumps in the middle of your chest you had better never never make that same mistake twice.
    The authority have jurisdiction should be your only authoritative source. It should always be remembered by all of us, "security normally cannot close down a building to correct deficiencies -- the fire marshal can and will."
    Enjoy your day,
    Bill

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Thanks Bill. I knew you would know.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Are all fire department elevator operator keys keyed alike? How about fire panels? The reason I ask is because someone told me that and it seems questionable.
    Mr. Security:
    Sorry it took so long to answer you. A cable repairman, new to this area, disconnected our phone and DSL service while trying to fix a problem in the houses on either side of ours.
    For elevators, it varies from jurisdiction, some are keyed alike, for certain others in specific groups according to the responding fire departments. That has caused problems in certain districts when one fire sector is tied up and units from other districts are dispatched. Some states required master keys to be in the possession of either battalion or department chiefs. If my facts are correct, all these key operated switches are tampered so at no time will it be employed without building or district authorities. The rub is sometimes fire of other disaster knocks out these lines of communication. That is why in most instances the authority having jurisdiction determines the rules.
    Some fire panels are master keyed by district others are not. The authority having jurisdiction establishes the rules. In all instances, strict key control is maintained.
    Ask your management to contact the authorities in those areas where they provide services.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Are all fire department elevator operator keys keyed alike? How about fire panels? The reason I ask is because someone told me that and it seems questionable.
    No.........

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    A Question for Bill W.

    Are all fire department elevator operator keys keyed alike? How about fire panels? The reason I ask is because someone told me that and it seems questionable.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Batsec
    The way our key system works is, to make changes to whoever has access to a door you need to reprogram the lock, which is a tedious task at time seeing that I have over 200 locks installed all over the factory. If you are in possesion of a key your key can only open locks that have been programmed to accept your key, and if you put your key in a lock you do not have access to the audit trail will show person x have put their keys in this lock.
    The software is only on my pc and i make the changes to the locks on the pc and use a controll key which I insert in the lock I made the changes to.
    So I have 180 people walking around with keys but each one is assigned to that person and he is responsible for where that key gets stuck into.
    The cylinder locks cost about 2100ZAR which is about $300 and the padlocks is about $428.
    Batsec:
    Where is your located, on what electrical circuit and just as important, what transformer service that computer's location? If you have any doubts, get together with your IT and facilities manager. You need to be concerned with inductive coupling.
    Are your padlocks have both toe and heel bolt keepers, spring or cam operated? When a space secured with a padlock device is open, are the padlocks locked to the hasp staple to prevent padlock substitution? If they are cam operated the possibility of "rapping" is precluded.
    Just a few thoughts for your consideration.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • Batsec
    replied
    The way our key system works is, to make changes to whoever has access to a door you need to reprogram the lock, which is a tedious task at time seeing that I have over 200 locks installed all over the factory. If you are in possesion of a key your key can only open locks that have been programmed to accept your key, and if you put your key in a lock you do not have access to the audit trail will show person x have put their keys in this lock.
    The software is only on my pc and i make the changes to the locks on the pc and use a controll key which I insert in the lock I made the changes to.
    So I have 180 people walking around with keys but each one is assigned to that person and he is responsible for where that key gets stuck into.
    The cylinder locks cost about 2100ZAR which is about $300 and the padlocks is about $428.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    Another Option:

    I am not sure to as what your departments funding may provide for, but in my case, of course each of my officers are issued a set of keys, with general access to secured areas, and sign a key assignment document, stating loss or abuse will result in cost of lock replacement to the officer. This has limitted the loss and access to areas adaquately.

    As for another option, in which I have also turned to, is Biometrics. It is now becoming more affordable. Our departments office door is biomtric, and same with sensative items lock up. It is easy to change user access on site, and also logs user entry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Batsec
    We have had problems in the past where after a weekend product will be missing from certain departments, and because Security department kept the keys we were the obious choice when the blame had to be put on someone.
    Our key system was 28 years old and there was a lot of keys in possesion of people unknown to us.
    we upgraded the whole key system to a electronic key system where you electronically hand out keys to certain ppl and those people are responsible for their key. the locks gives a full audit trail and also the keys can be checked if needed. The bonus is the system is only availeble from one supplier in south africa and all spares and upgrades needs to be ordered from israel.
    It works and no more product misteriously dissapears over weekends...
    Batsec:
    What we learned the hard way was it was a key, it could duplicated by any person with nefarious intent. If you have a record that indicates the time a particular protected space was entered, you can narrow the suspects. Also check to be assured the electronic system can’t be turned off without notification. If the head-end equipment has sophisticated encrypted software and does not revert to “0” binary after any kind of signal disruption, you are more secure than most. Never underestimate the human element in a security system. As long as mendacity and larceny lurks in the hearts and minds of people, a threat to security will always exist.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • Batsec
    replied
    We have had problems in the past where after a weekend product will be missing from certain departments, and because Security department kept the keys we were the obious choice when the blame had to be put on someone.
    Our key system was 28 years old and there was a lot of keys in possesion of people unknown to us.
    we upgraded the whole key system to a electronic key system where you electronically hand out keys to certain ppl and those people are responsible for their key. the locks gives a full audit trail and also the keys can be checked if needed. The bonus is the system is only availeble from one supplier in south africa and all spares and upgrades needs to be ordered from israel.
    It works and no more product misteriously dissapears over weekends...

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    In the old days when hotels used metal keys, control was almost non existant. When guest keys were lost the locks were rarely replaced. Once a month they'd simply cut more keys. Even when master & submaster keys were lost, it was rare that anything would be done.

    The worse thing I found at my hotel was when we had a lazy Maintenance man. At the end of the month when it was time to cut the keys for the missing ones, instead of using the keys he had in his office, he'd use the master key & make every key a master. He'd stamp the room number on it. We found out about it when drunk guests started walking into other rooms

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  • ACP01
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    The client needs intrusion detection, most definately, since the locks cannot be trusted. Is there a clause in the lease that states the tenant may not perform improvements or easements to the property? If not, the guy needs to alarm every door and window, if he hasn't already, and have the alarm controller call him and the security company - silent activation - so that the "representative's" intrusions can be documented at the end of a 9mm.
    Been trying to get them to do just that.
    Policy is SOs clear the place, turn on the lights etc before the clients enter.
    One morning just as I turned on the lights someone came thru the back door which was to my immediate right rear (8 feet measured). Luckily for him the representitive was with him as he was already looking down the barrel. .45ACP, the guy said it looked like a cannon!

    Talk about POd, I read the riot act to the Rep on the spot!

    Still working on changes.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by ACP01
    A small business client I have Has a real key control problem.
    When the building was leased they allowed the owner to insert a clause where he or his representitve will have keys to "ALL Doors"!

    When I asked if the place had been re-keyed or locks changed I was told thet the owner has complete control of that and that he just changes locks around.

    Anyway I am pushing them to renegotiate a lease.
    The client needs intrusion detection, most definately, since the locks cannot be trusted. Is there a clause in the lease that states the tenant may not perform improvements or easements to the property? If not, the guy needs to alarm every door and window, if he hasn't already, and have the alarm controller call him and the security company - silent activation - so that the "representative's" intrusions can be documented at the end of a 9mm.

    Leave a comment:


  • ACP01
    replied
    A small business client I have Has a real key control problem.
    When the building was leased they allowed the owner to insert a clause where he or his representitve will have keys to "ALL Doors"!

    When I asked if the place had been re-keyed or locks changed I was told thet the owner has complete control of that and that he just changes locks around.

    Anyway I am pushing them to renegotiate a lease.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    We use magnetic key cards in my hotels. I am the administrator of the system. We've had problems where Maids have not turned in the cards at the end of the day. Usually they have forgotten them in their uniform pockets in their lockers or have taken them home. The problem is when we can't reach them at home or they still can't find them. What I ended up doing is issuing key cards at the begining of the shift that have a short expiry period (they can be made to expire up to 7 years). I program them daily for 9 hours. At the end of the shift if they're missing, no loss . Also with this system I can tell what key card was used at what time in a lock. It is a very big deterent to theft by employees. Last year I caught 2 rookie Mini Bar attendants stealing & delt with them. They didn't realize I could tell that they were the only person to have entered the rooms during the time period the guests claimed the items disappeared.

    Leave a comment:

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