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  • Corporate Key Control Policy

    Does anyone have an example of a comprehensive Key & Lock Control Polcy that I may have? I am trying to keep from reinventing the wheel. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by mdbalentine
    Does anyone have an example of a comprehensive Key & Lock Control Polcy that I may have? I am trying to keep from reinventing the wheel. Thanks.
    We use a locked key cabinet with numbered keys. When a key is needed, all information is logged in a master key control binder and documented on the s/o's shift report. A supervisor regularly audits the key cabinet and master log. If a critical key is requested, it is best if a s/o can unlock the area that needs to be accessed and remain in the area until it can be relocked. There are many other factors to be considered as well. I'm sure that Bill Warnock can provide you with detailed information on this. (Hope I didn't put you on the spot, Bill )
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #3
      No Mr. Security, you did not. mdbalentine, for starters, I recommend the following to my clients:
      Has a comprehensive key and lock control system been initiated? People appointed as the primary and secondary custodians, and by whom? Have sub-custodians for each major division or office been appointed and by whom? Are key control registers in use throughout the facility? High security locks must be resistant to: picking, tampering and forced entry. If padlocks are in use, are they cam operated and provide protection equivalent to those meeting MIL-P-17802 (current edition).
      Find a security person who has Protection of Assets Manual. Get Volume I, go to Chapter 4. That chapter has an extensive Appendix on control measures.
      What ever you publish, have it published in the name of senior management. As with all written policies and procedures, have it staffed through those departments affected and above all staff it with legal counsel, organic or on retainer.
      Enjoy the day,
      Bill

      Comment


      • #4
        We have a computerized key control system ( KeyTrak and Morse) that only allows keys to be withdrawn by personnel with an authorized access code. Different levels of key access according to job duties and an instant report at your fingertips of who has keys signed out now and a record of who signed them out in the past. Works extremely well for us, we have several main key locations covering over 300 buildings in use by several different departments with a main key backup for lost keys or keys that happen to be out but are needed immediately. Excellent control and management much preferred to the old honor system.
        Old age and treachery will defeat youth and enthusiasm every time-

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        • #5
          good Key Control

          Good Key control is good security practice both for you the key holder and the possible clients. I have seen time after time keys laying all over desks and tables and hanging up on walls in offices etc. And i ask myself why? and master keys given out to just anyone that needs them and no logs of who got one and when and if it was ever returned. I say to myself this is bad security and taking no regard for safety towards your property or clients property.

          If there would be a breakin and/or theft of keys from the office how would you know what was stolen let alone how many keys if there is no logging and the keys lay out in the open for all to see. I think all properties should secure all keys master and regular in a locked secured box or chest. And there should only be one person that is in charge of the key control to minimize liability and help keep track of who is all going in and out of the key box.

          There was a case years ago where an apt complex didnt change the locks on an apt they rented and the rapist had a key for the apt and came in and raped the female tenant. The female sued the apt complex and won the case because the apt complex was held liable for there actions for not changing the locks. Even if you just moved the locks around from door to door no one is going to run around and try every door with there old key.

          When issuing out master keys ask yourself does this person really need a master and if so why and what places to they really need to get into. limit the issue of master keys, especially if you dont have high security locks, keys can be easily duplicated at most hardware and retail stores for under $2.00.
          and once a key is made you have just compromised your whole security system by having master keys out all over and not even knowing it.

          I have seen locks on doors for over 20 years and the owners have said they have never changed nor rekeyed the lock. and i ask myselfs wow i would think after a few years i would think you should have it rekeyed you dont know who all has keys anymore. especially if you are not the first owner of the property. When buying new properties i think the first thing you should do is rekey the whole place. cost is alot of $ but liablity sure wont be there then you will know who has and doesnt have keys.

          Well that is my 2cents worth just a reminder to dont always assume you are the only one that has a key you might be surprised. i have worked places in the past and have been in control of the keys and have found lots lots of problems no logs no nothing had no idea all these people running around with master keys for maintenance rooms etc.

          another thing ive seen is that say an electrician needs to get into a maintenance/boiler room ok now you have to give him a key well you dont know what regular key # it is or if you have one so you just give him a master key for that. well now you have just given him a master key for every lock that key fits. not a very good idea. He has no reason to have a master key only needs to get into one room. that is liablility.

          thanks for listening.
          If anyone else has any experience with some of these issues ive mentioned
          please let me know id be interested in everyones input on this.

          Tim

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          • #6
            We use magnetic key cards in my hotels. I am the administrator of the system. We've had problems where Maids have not turned in the cards at the end of the day. Usually they have forgotten them in their uniform pockets in their lockers or have taken them home. The problem is when we can't reach them at home or they still can't find them. What I ended up doing is issuing key cards at the begining of the shift that have a short expiry period (they can be made to expire up to 7 years). I program them daily for 9 hours. At the end of the shift if they're missing, no loss . Also with this system I can tell what key card was used at what time in a lock. It is a very big deterent to theft by employees. Last year I caught 2 rookie Mini Bar attendants stealing & delt with them. They didn't realize I could tell that they were the only person to have entered the rooms during the time period the guests claimed the items disappeared.
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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            • #7
              A small business client I have Has a real key control problem.
              When the building was leased they allowed the owner to insert a clause where he or his representitve will have keys to "ALL Doors"!

              When I asked if the place had been re-keyed or locks changed I was told thet the owner has complete control of that and that he just changes locks around.

              Anyway I am pushing them to renegotiate a lease.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ACP01
                A small business client I have Has a real key control problem.
                When the building was leased they allowed the owner to insert a clause where he or his representitve will have keys to "ALL Doors"!

                When I asked if the place had been re-keyed or locks changed I was told thet the owner has complete control of that and that he just changes locks around.

                Anyway I am pushing them to renegotiate a lease.
                The client needs intrusion detection, most definately, since the locks cannot be trusted. Is there a clause in the lease that states the tenant may not perform improvements or easements to the property? If not, the guy needs to alarm every door and window, if he hasn't already, and have the alarm controller call him and the security company - silent activation - so that the "representative's" intrusions can be documented at the end of a 9mm.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                  The client needs intrusion detection, most definately, since the locks cannot be trusted. Is there a clause in the lease that states the tenant may not perform improvements or easements to the property? If not, the guy needs to alarm every door and window, if he hasn't already, and have the alarm controller call him and the security company - silent activation - so that the "representative's" intrusions can be documented at the end of a 9mm.
                  Been trying to get them to do just that.
                  Policy is SOs clear the place, turn on the lights etc before the clients enter.
                  One morning just as I turned on the lights someone came thru the back door which was to my immediate right rear (8 feet measured). Luckily for him the representitive was with him as he was already looking down the barrel. .45ACP, the guy said it looked like a cannon!

                  Talk about POd, I read the riot act to the Rep on the spot!

                  Still working on changes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In the old days when hotels used metal keys, control was almost non existant. When guest keys were lost the locks were rarely replaced. Once a month they'd simply cut more keys. Even when master & submaster keys were lost, it was rare that anything would be done.

                    The worse thing I found at my hotel was when we had a lazy Maintenance man. At the end of the month when it was time to cut the keys for the missing ones, instead of using the keys he had in his office, he'd use the master key & make every key a master. He'd stamp the room number on it. We found out about it when drunk guests started walking into other rooms
                    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have had problems in the past where after a weekend product will be missing from certain departments, and because Security department kept the keys we were the obious choice when the blame had to be put on someone.
                      Our key system was 28 years old and there was a lot of keys in possesion of people unknown to us.
                      we upgraded the whole key system to a electronic key system where you electronically hand out keys to certain ppl and those people are responsible for their key. the locks gives a full audit trail and also the keys can be checked if needed. The bonus is the system is only availeble from one supplier in south africa and all spares and upgrades needs to be ordered from israel.
                      It works and no more product misteriously dissapears over weekends...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Batsec
                        We have had problems in the past where after a weekend product will be missing from certain departments, and because Security department kept the keys we were the obious choice when the blame had to be put on someone.
                        Our key system was 28 years old and there was a lot of keys in possesion of people unknown to us.
                        we upgraded the whole key system to a electronic key system where you electronically hand out keys to certain ppl and those people are responsible for their key. the locks gives a full audit trail and also the keys can be checked if needed. The bonus is the system is only availeble from one supplier in south africa and all spares and upgrades needs to be ordered from israel.
                        It works and no more product misteriously dissapears over weekends...
                        Batsec:
                        What we learned the hard way was it was a key, it could duplicated by any person with nefarious intent. If you have a record that indicates the time a particular protected space was entered, you can narrow the suspects. Also check to be assured the electronic system can’t be turned off without notification. If the head-end equipment has sophisticated encrypted software and does not revert to “0” binary after any kind of signal disruption, you are more secure than most. Never underestimate the human element in a security system. As long as mendacity and larceny lurks in the hearts and minds of people, a threat to security will always exist.
                        Enjoy the day,
                        Bill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Another Option:

                          I am not sure to as what your departments funding may provide for, but in my case, of course each of my officers are issued a set of keys, with general access to secured areas, and sign a key assignment document, stating loss or abuse will result in cost of lock replacement to the officer. This has limitted the loss and access to areas adaquately.

                          As for another option, in which I have also turned to, is Biometrics. It is now becoming more affordable. Our departments office door is biomtric, and same with sensative items lock up. It is easy to change user access on site, and also logs user entry.
                          Deputy Sheriff

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                          • #14
                            The way our key system works is, to make changes to whoever has access to a door you need to reprogram the lock, which is a tedious task at time seeing that I have over 200 locks installed all over the factory. If you are in possesion of a key your key can only open locks that have been programmed to accept your key, and if you put your key in a lock you do not have access to the audit trail will show person x have put their keys in this lock.
                            The software is only on my pc and i make the changes to the locks on the pc and use a controll key which I insert in the lock I made the changes to.
                            So I have 180 people walking around with keys but each one is assigned to that person and he is responsible for where that key gets stuck into.
                            The cylinder locks cost about 2100ZAR which is about $300 and the padlocks is about $428.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Batsec
                              The way our key system works is, to make changes to whoever has access to a door you need to reprogram the lock, which is a tedious task at time seeing that I have over 200 locks installed all over the factory. If you are in possesion of a key your key can only open locks that have been programmed to accept your key, and if you put your key in a lock you do not have access to the audit trail will show person x have put their keys in this lock.
                              The software is only on my pc and i make the changes to the locks on the pc and use a controll key which I insert in the lock I made the changes to.
                              So I have 180 people walking around with keys but each one is assigned to that person and he is responsible for where that key gets stuck into.
                              The cylinder locks cost about 2100ZAR which is about $300 and the padlocks is about $428.
                              Batsec:
                              Where is your located, on what electrical circuit and just as important, what transformer service that computer's location? If you have any doubts, get together with your IT and facilities manager. You need to be concerned with inductive coupling.
                              Are your padlocks have both toe and heel bolt keepers, spring or cam operated? When a space secured with a padlock device is open, are the padlocks locked to the hasp staple to prevent padlock substitution? If they are cam operated the possibility of "rapping" is precluded.
                              Just a few thoughts for your consideration.
                              Enjoy the day,
                              Bill

                              Comment

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