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How often to check cameras?

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  • crankloud
    replied
    I work in a psyciatric facility and the biggest problem i have is cheap cameras installed by unqualified people. The cameras seem to be able to perform every function (tilt, pan, zoom etc,etc.) but we have no control centre for these functions.
    We have a dvr which can hold 4 months of footage with 16 channels (pacific communications) but cannot use it to it's full advantage.
    It seems to me unless you know what you are looking for and at, you shouldn't install cameras.





    We haven't had a break-in for a while, let's cancel security!

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Burley,

    One suggestion may be to set up a general preventive maintenance type program. Set up that officers are required to check X amount of cameras weekly.

    I used to work at a Vets Facility where are job was both Security and Fire Prevention/Suppression. They had hundreds of extinguishers that we were required to inspect monthly. So we divided up the campus. One week we checked all of them in Building X, next week we checked all of them in Building Y, following week we checked them in Building Z, and so on.

    My. 01 (Hey I work Security can't afford 2 cents )

    Leave a comment:


  • burley
    replied
    don't be naive...size always mattered but some people just didn't complain

    Harrington,

    Thanks for your insight. Some government organizations don't want to budget for the intangibles like maintenance, hence we end up with crappy images after a homocide occurs and then they look to me as if I planned an ineffective surveillance system. Government funding for crime prevention efforts in Canada is like pulling teeth.

    Leave a comment:


  • john_harrington
    replied
    Originally posted by burley View Post
    All of your comments regarding CCTV maintenance are interesting but what about systems where there are upwards of 1000 cameras with more to come? Yes my organization has a Communications Section but the best they can do is check and maintain the cameras every 3 months, and to add to the complexity of the problem - the CCTV sites are spread throughout a major city.

    You can imagine the state of strictly "recorded not monitored" camera images when we pull them for a criminal occurrence - real lunch bag let down. Any ideas on how to create a more effective way of managing a massive surveillance program where costs are publicly funded?

    BTW - I'm the person who requests the installation of the camera system and I'm not techy so any advice is appreciated.
    Burley,

    Haven't you heard that size doesn't matter!

    Only kidding but remember whether you have two cameras or 5000 cameras, there still has to be an effective policy for checking CCTV images. If your organization does not have the staffing for that, perhaps you should consider using a third party to do so. I like seeing daily camera checks, but in your case weekly may be more appropriate.

    If you are using a matrix switch, either analog or virtual, the system can be programmed to "salvo" the cameras one after the other so that the operator can sit there and review the images more easily.

    Leave a comment:


  • john_harrington
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    This should be interesting.

    On another tangent, why do agencies and companies have un-monitored cameras? There's no response if something happens.
    Nathan,

    Each CCTV system has a different function that has to be considered during the design process. There are essentially three major functions in my estimation:
    1. Surveillance - an operator physically watching a monitor or bank of monitors.
    2. Event driven alarm assessment- When integrated with an access control system, various alarms can cause a camera to be called to the operator's screen so the he/she can assess the alarm in real time.
    3. Post incident assessment- Unmonitored cameras are used to discover what happened after an incident was discovered. This is why most users have a policy outlining how long they retain CCTV images.

    John

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  • john_harrington
    replied
    Hotel,

    I understand your pain and agree to a certain extent in your case but I think you may need more tools. Are you using DVRs with decent search capabilities (motion, directional line crossing, light change)? If not, the ROI on these boxes would be pretty short given the investigation time you are spending!

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    This should be interesting.

    On another tangent, why do agencies and companies have un-monitored cameras? There's no response if something happens.
    I have them in my 3 hotels & they are more of a pain than a help. Time that should be spent doing active patrols are wasted looking for something that already happened. Then even if you have a clear photo of the suspect, what then. If you are checking the video a day later he could be in another country by then!! The only use I've had for un-monitored cameras is when a suspect has been caught, as evidence. Or like yesterday when a guest had his bag that he left unspervised, stolen. He claims he asked an employee to keep her eyes on his luggage while he went to get his car. The video showed that the briefcase was stolen BEFORE he even spoke to the employee.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    This should be interesting.

    On another tangent, why do agencies and companies have un-monitored cameras? There's no response if something happens.
    I have them in my 3 hotels & they are more of a pain than a help. Time that should be spent doing active patrols are wasted looking for something that already happened. Then even if you have a clear photo of the suspect, what then. If you are checking the video a day later he could be in another country by then!! The only use I've had for un-monitored cameras is when a suspect has been caught, as evidence.
    Last edited by HotelSecurity; 06-12-2007, 04:52 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    This should be interesting.

    On another tangent, why do agencies and companies have un-monitored cameras? There's no response if something happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • burley
    replied
    what to do about checking/maintaining 100's of CCTV cameras?

    All of your comments regarding CCTV maintenance are interesting but what about systems where there are upwards of 1000 cameras with more to come? Yes my organization has a Communications Section but the best they can do is check and maintain the cameras every 3 months, and to add to the complexity of the problem - the CCTV sites are spread throughout a major city.

    You can imagine the state of strictly "recorded not monitored" camera images when we pull them for a criminal occurrence - real lunch bag let down. Any ideas on how to create a more effective way of managing a massive surveillance program where costs are publicly funded?

    BTW - I'm the person who requests the installation of the camera system and I'm not techy so any advice is appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • john_harrington
    replied
    Dave,

    It sounds like your program is set up correctly- congratulations.

    The Intellex is a great choice for a DVR-are you using the Ultras yet?

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • souperdave
    replied
    For many many moons now ours are checked each a.m., midday, and at close...we have 3 by 16cam Intellex that keep vigil day and nite with 6 motion capture zones.
    Any service difficulties are called in promptly and they're contractually obligated to a 4hr response/resolution window.

    In the event that timespan is compromised, we have spares that can be put to use.

    We don't necessarily have a high-risk 'hood....and we like to keep it that way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Curtis, John, Rooney have hit it directly on the head you need to check them at the start of every shift and document your findings on your official log. Brief the oncoming shift supervisor on all the things you normall would and what the status of CCTV system is.
    Now the hard part, there has to be a reporting regimen without the convoluted twists and turns I've seen in some post orders. Plus, there must be specific penalties established should the responsible parties fail to repair.
    Key to this operation is leadership with spine not afflicted by indecision.
    Again, good job everyone, home and tea!
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • john_harrington
    replied
    Daily checks of the CCTV cameras and recording system should be part of the policies and procedures of every site.

    Fire,

    You need a new vendor or at a minimum someone needs to hold a "come to Jesus" meeting with Sensormatic. I have never written an RFP for a service contract that allows for longer than a 4 hour response time under any circumstances.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    I think we have seven or so for a six story building. They feed into (best as I can tell) a maintenance buildling I don't have access to. Would be handy to have as at least I could see the lobby entrances but oh well.

    Leave a comment:

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