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  • Suggestions for Motivation for Training

    I work as an Account Trainer for my company. We are working trying to get our employees motivated to do some training via our online system. However here are some of the problems I am facing and honestly, don't blame my officers. However one of the benefits is college credit if an individual finishes the supervisory courses and classes. But this is not a bonus for everyone. It is also consideration for pay raises and promotions in the future.

    1. It is self-study, and not paid for.
    2. Some do not have computer access, even though they can come to our office and work on it there.
    3. Some are retiree's and just are working to pass the time and collect a paycheck.


    Does anyone have any suggestions or incentives besides compensation or initiating a pay raise for the courses completed?

  • #2
    Making it mandatory. Of course that would most likely mean compensation. Is the training something that could be life saving? If so, you might want to point that out.
    "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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    • #3
      I understand your dilemma. Some companies allow employees who complete additional training to wear special pins or nameplates to indicate this to others. Another suggestion is to limit supervisor positions to those who are motivated enough to complete such programs. Of course, the company's legal department will want to examine such a proposed policy with their state's discrimination laws.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #4
        Consider the use of in-service training sessions that normally accompany normal shift briefings. Just like duck mating, short and sweet. Emphasis on their staying alive and not injured performing their normal duties based on small details easily remembered.
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

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        • #5
          There really isn't a motivation issue with regard to this particular course because it isn't universal in scope (applicable to all officers). It is of relevance and interest only to those who wish to become supervisors, and most of them will bring their own internal motivation to the course. You really have no particular reason to try to "motivate" anyone who does not have that desire. Lots of officers have no wish to be supervisors.

          Rather than motivation, which the interested officer will bring to the table himself, I think you might focus on building anticipation. How will the course make the individual a better supervisor? You answer this question rhetorically by building a series of smaller questions posed from the student's viewpoint. You might prepare a course flyer that gives details about the course, including a description of each module. Include a section like the following in your flyer...preferably just above the access information:

          _______________________________________

          This course will answer questions like these:

          1. How can I develop loyalty in my team?

          2. How can I correct an officer in a positive way?

          3. How can I reward extra effort if the budget won't let me award bonuses?

          4. What are the Seven Deadly Questions I cannot ask a job applicant?

          5. What different scheduling alternatives are available?

          6. What's the difference between "leading" and "managing"?

          7. I have a complaint from a citizen about an officer. What do I do now?

          8. What is "progressive discipline" and how is it used?

          ENROLL NOW AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STEP IN YOUR CAREER!


          ______________________________

          (You create your own questions based on course content, of course.)

          For legal and practical reasons, and not as a means of "motivation", I would make this course mandatory for all supervisor promotional candidates. It is the height of folly today to promote anyone to supervisory positions who has not received formal training in supervision...and particularly with regard to the employment and other laws that supervisors must observe and uphold. No one can get your company into legal hot water faster than an untrained supervisor.

          Also, an untrained supervisor who does not know how to lead people can cost you badly in areas of morale and job performance. This usually translates into people resigning or performing badly in their jobs, which in turn usually translates into staffing problems and very unhappy clients. Result: The ultimate loss of business.

          Bottom line: This is not a course that really presents any motivational issues. It will interest those to whom it is targeted. For many other reasons, however, it should be mandatory either prior to or immediately after promotion.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 06-02-2007, 10:06 PM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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          • #6
            Good for you, you see a problem and want to do something about it.

            Is there another way to present the course? Maybe a print out that can be partially completed on the job, and going to the office computer for the testing.

            A formal meeting every 6 months with presentation of course completion certificates being the high light,to give people a few minutes in the spot light?
            Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
            Groucho Marx

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            • #7
              If the guards are not willing to do what it takes to make sure they can be the best at what they're doing, why not work to get rid of them? I understand it sounds cruel but I currently sell auto parts and I don't want anyone working for me who is just there to collect a paycheck, even if they are retired. I especially don't want anyone there collecting a paycheck who may be covering my behind one day. In my opinion, that encourages the "warm body" syndrome that makes security look bad in the first place.

              Make the training mandatory, and a lot of times you can coordinate with a local library to make the internet available to those without internet access.
              Anything that hits the fan,
              Will not be evenly distributed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Contact View Post
                If the guards are not willing to do what it takes to make sure they can be the best at what they're doing, why not work to get rid of them? I understand it sounds cruel but I currently sell auto parts and I don't want anyone working for me who is just there to collect a paycheck, even if they are retired. I especially don't want anyone there collecting a paycheck who may be covering my behind one day. In my opinion, that encourages the "warm body" syndrome that makes security look bad in the first place.

                Make the training mandatory, and a lot of times you can coordinate with a local library to make the internet available to those without internet access.
                I wish I had a say in that matter. Unfortunately that is considered an executive decision. My positon is training and development. One solution, well let's call it a band-aid is an incentive program at the moment. Besides the compensation issue, the other chief complaint is that individuals are afraid to use the computer. (Training is online e-courses). So we are beginning and incentive program for the next three months. For each class completed, an officer will be issued a raffle ticket. At the end of the three months, a drawing will be held for prizes.

                A solution I presented on my end is when new hires come in for processing, I've been giving them an orientation to the system. This has seemingly assisted to a degree. However they are only completing the required courses, which in essence is better than nothing. But it eliminates the fear of the computer once they see how easy it is. The other incentives is that for supervision positions, certain classes must be completed. Once that is done with some of hte other training, college credit becomes a possibilty.

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                • #9
                  What are the courses in question?

                  And is this for a particular site that your company has, or for all sites? And what kind of site(s)?

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                  • #10
                    The website is company wide, but basic officers at least at my account are assigned 28 basic security courses and the supervisors 36.

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                    • #11
                      HM have you tried putting them in a management position in the office let them deal with the daily actives there. There also seminars you could let them go to to be a supervisor they could get credit and use them to wards college. Money is alway what any Officer is looking towards when becoming a supervisor ,But you also have to look at your people the young men and women will they move on the middle age guy with wife and kids are sometime the best bet, who in the group stand out to be supervisors.

                      I found out the best way to weed them out is to put up a sign up sheet found out who wants move up and grab them first and go on from there.
                      It is just my two cents

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                      • #12
                        I understand the courses on offer are done online... some people today (perhaps your more senior officers) are 'technophobic' (without knowing the scope of your position) would you be qualified to conduct classes in one module/section initially to get the 'thirst for knowledge' started?

                        Alternatively work through one of the modules in a group setting prior to the commencement of their shifts?

                        Short of making it mandatory, company policy etc. you can only do so much to motivate people whom are often resistant to change
                        "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

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                        • #13
                          It ha sprobably already been mentioned, but...

                          the pages are taking too long to load, so I will say do what my company does. They make sure that guards and other employees unwilling to train are informed of the volatility of the industry and the great ease in which the management could find a reason to hire someone to fill their shoes. Sounds harsh and it sucks, but it's true. If you don't want to better yourself and be a greater asset to the company, you will get stuck on sh*t shifts until you get sick of it and quit and we will have 5 people to replace you when you do.
                          Last edited by doulos Christou; 07-29-2007, 04:58 PM.

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                          • #14
                            After reading all these post I can only come up with one suggestion....PAY THEM!

                            I don't know about your state, But I know in some states you can pay minimum wage for training if they aren't already making min-wage.

                            if you pay them for it, you can then make it mandatory. and if they don't complete it in a certain time frame they forfeit their position. thats what my company does.

                            whats the big deal about paying them?...If a company isn't paying me for training they require I wouldn't want to do it either. its my time I'm not getting paid for it, ill do what I want.

                            Also one question, is it possibility of a pay increase when completion of the classes are done, or is it guaranteed? and is it significant enough to offset the time put in that they weren't getting paid for?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NvJuggalo View Post
                              After reading all these post I can only come up with one suggestion....PAY THEM!
                              Paying people for training that the client(s) aren't paying you for cuts into profits. This is one of the reasons why companies only train in what clients request. Also why the states mandate training, usually at the expense of the potential employee, prior to licensing.

                              Originally posted by NvJuggalo View Post
                              I don't know about your state, But I know in some states you can pay minimum wage for training if they aren't already making min-wage.
                              So, on top of paying the trainer, the training materials, etc, you are paying the employee 5.15 an hour to do something that the client(s) aren't paying for.

                              Originally posted by NvJuggalo View Post
                              if you pay them for it, you can then make it mandatory. and if they don't complete it in a certain time frame they forfeit their position. thats what my company does.
                              If the client doesn't mandate it, then its pure loss.

                              Originally posted by NvJuggalo View Post
                              whats the big deal about paying them?...If a company isn't paying me for training they require I wouldn't want to do it either. its my time I'm not getting paid for it, ill do what I want.
                              See above. Pure money.

                              Originally posted by NvJuggalo View Post
                              Also one question, is it possibility of a pay increase when completion of the classes are done, or is it guaranteed? and is it significant enough to offset the time put in that they weren't getting paid for?
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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