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Monitoring S/Os via CCTV cameras

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  • john_harrington
    replied
    Unfortunately, most organizations lack a CCTV acceptable use policy that would dictate what the cameras are being used for, how long they are storing video, etc. I have found that having such a policy can mitigate an employee's concerns about "big brother"

    John

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  • bpdblue
    replied
    In today's world a guard (and actually anyone in the safety / rescue business) should always act like they believe they are always being recorded by someone, be it a friendly recording, or otherwise.

    With all the cell phone camera's, store camera's, atm camera's, ect, the likelyhood of being recorded is all to real. If you always act like you think your being recorded then hopefully your actions will be the best they could be for what ever situation that got recorded, so you should come out of it looking pretty good.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    On my last day with 1 company, the client mgr gave me a new duty bag as a parting gift before thanking me for my 6 months of good service. An armed S/O subordinate saw red and waited until we were alone to verbally attack me then threaten to "sort me outside after I left". Our CCTV recorded his behaviour and the idiot failed to hang up a phone call so it thankfully was heard at our sister site. The S/O stands up, pats his gun and shoves me into a metal door with a "sorry arsehole". I stumble to control my balance and feel a bit pain in my ribs. I then answer my mobile to find it is the State Ops Mgr who had just witnessed everything on CCTV. 2 mgrs from that site arrived on site to relieve me of command to complete my reports and to suspend the S/O from duty. I was thankful that the CCTV system was being monitored for a welfare check at the time by the other site. 2 days later the S/O was fired and 2 months later I heard he was fired for something similar with another company.

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  • Unit6
    replied
    I personaly dont mind if my Employer watches me on CCTV because i do my job. Also if a altercation happens and you stick to your proceadure, its on film proving that you are doing you job.

    As far as them watching for you doing your job, i find that a bit silly. if they dont feel that you arnt doing your job, they should bring it to your attention, not use the CCTV to prove or disprove your work ethic.

    As i type this im under CCTV, again i dont mind because if some one comes off the street and forces me into the steps to use force is on camra and im justified by the footage. i guess its a double edge sword, it can cut the bad guy and cut the officer if they are not doing their job.

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  • CameraMan
    replied
    Another terrific resource is SCD's catalog. They have stuff no one else has ever heard of. But, like SecTrainer points out, they rarely or never mention the product code or manufacturer to make it harder to comparison shop. Meh. Everyone has to make a living, I guess.

    Speaking of making a living, I work in the Surveillance Video department of one of the largest photo and video retailers in the world, so if you need a deal, send me a private message.

    Note: I was told by my boss, you caught me on this forum during work hours, that I can answer any questions about security cameras on this forum but I cannot represent myself as an employee of the company I work for unless someone specifically requests information relevant to a purchase.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Today, there is a tremendous amount of variety and versatility available in both still and video gear, and audio recording gear as well - quite a bit of which is "wearable". There are now also tiny video recorders about the size of a pack of cigarettes you can wear on a duty belt.

    As I've mentioned elsewhere, you can find gear like this at sites like PI Mall, but you'll get the best price elsewhere. Here's a trick for doing this:

    Sites that sell gear all simply copy the manufacturer's "technical specifications" word for word. MODEL NUMBERS (like "MM-5502C") and TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION PHRASES make great search phrases for this reason. For any product, you can go to the "technical details", "technical specifications", etc., and simply pick out a fairly unique-looking phrase. For instance, the physical dimensions often make a unique phrase.

    Highlight your unique specs phrase by holding your left mouse button down and dragging across it. Copy the phrase to your clipboard with CTL-C, go to Google's advanced search page and copy the phrase using CTL-V into the "exact phrase" text box. Hit SEARCH, and your results will reveal all the places that have that phrase (hence, that same product, or one exactly like it - which is also okay).

    Wanna try it? OK.

    At PI Mall, we find a product for a tiny camcorder/still camera at this page: PI Mall Page - price $79.50.

    On this page, we see a specification phrase as follows: "Internal 5.9 MB SDRAM about 80 photos or 40 seconds of video" - that looks pretty unique, doesn't it. Okay, let's try that search phrase in Google. We highlight the whole phrase, hit CTL-C to copy it to the Windows clipboard, and go to Google's Advanced Search page (which you should almost always be using instead of the basic search page).

    We put the cursor in the "Exact Phrase" text box and hit CTL-V to paste in the phrase we copied. We then hit SEARCH and get this search result page.

    The very first hit on that page is from a company called "Spy Chest", where the very same product is available for $59.75 - a 25% savings for about 30 seconds of work.

    You can use this technique when comparison-shopping from any retailer, who sometimes will not mention the actual brand name or manufacturer's name precisely because they don't want you to comparison shop!

    Why not use the brand name to search? Well, you can, but your results will be very spotty since lots of this kind of gear either has no "real" brand name at all, or sellers make up their own names.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 10-14-2007, 10:48 PM.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I bought a very basic tiny digital camera which fits into a pager case on my duty belt. It is nothing too fancy and uses 2 x AAA batteries but the number of times I have witnessed and photographed car accidents and work incidents has been worth it's weight in gold. I also have the next model up that lives in my work folder for taking site photographs as well as other things as well.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Ron Jessee View Post
    After reading an article in a popular LE magazine, I've given some thought about purchasing a high res digital camera to have at hand while on duty for documentation purposes in areas with no CCTV coverage. Definitely in the officer's interest to cover their ass.
    Ron, that is an excellent idea; however, I'd suggest you carry it with you at all times. Why? If there is CCTV coverage at a particular site, it may not cover all areas and an incident just might occur in an area without adequate coverage or coverage from a particular view not adequately covered even if were CCTV in use.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    In my state in Australia, we operate under a government act called the WORKPLACE SURVEILLANCE ACT and in a nut shell it says: (1) Staff must be notified at the staff entry (2) cannot be used for time/motion studies (3) all NEW installations must give staff 2 weeks notice to object (4) no covert cameras allowed (must be visible) (5) must have a seperate control room (6) cameras can't not be set up in private change rooms / dunnies (7) tapes cannot be use for other purposes (ie. perving on breasts) (8) any covert cameras must go through a judge and the order only lasts 30 days only).

    It used to be a late night visit from me when I had my own company or I would just telnet into their system to have a look at where people were. I would also tell them that the CCTV is a welfare check to ensure they are ok and have not had an accident behind a counter. Duh - we work in the security industry so if these guys have something to hide - then perhaps cake decorating is more for them and working in a known part of our industry with CCTV. Where I worked during Y2K, my office was originally under 24 / 7 CCTV for the fact that I safes and other things inside and sometimes the CEO needed to obtain a backup file or a file and still needed to be watched.

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  • integrator97
    replied
    Well, I took this to mean general cameras through out the mall areas. So you have no privacy there anyway. I have a camera in out front lobby, as well as 2 out front and 3 in the warehouse. But I purposly set the front lobby not to get the office manager or the counter area.

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  • CameraMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
    Not everyone who dislikes CCTV supervision is trying to hide something. Some of us just prefer our privacy and appreciate employers who trust us. Does the employer have a right to "spy?" You bet. However, a better solution is to record everything, but only review the tape if there is a problem.
    I agree. If you call your employees on the carpet for every little thing, going to the videotape to back yourself up, you will soon be left with a collection of bitter, disgruntled employees with low morale. More so than usual, I mean.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Not everyone who dislikes CCTV supervision is trying to hide something. Some of us just prefer our privacy and appreciate employers who trust us. Does the employer have a right to "spy?" You bet. However, a better solution is to record everything, but only review the tape if there is a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    If they're doing their job, it shouldn't be a problem. Just don't call them on the carpet for every imperfection, or else it will become a problem.

    I've found the ones that complain are either cronic complainers, or have something to hide.

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  • ronnieb
    replied
    I always made it a point to check all my sites from home before hanging it up for the night. I always made a call to the buildings if I saw one of my officers doing something right or wrong. This showed that I could be watching at any time and had the desired effect on those officers that tended to slack off when management was not around.

    It also helped when my officers were doing thier job and had accusations of misconduct leveled against them. I can think of two occasions that vindicated an officer that would have faced stiff disciplinary action had that extra eye not been there.

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  • Ron Jessee
    replied
    After reading an article in a popular LE magazine, I've given some thought about purchasing a high res digital camera to have at hand while on duty for documentation purposes in areas with no CCTV coverage. Definitely in the officer's interest to cover their ass.

    Leave a comment:

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