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  • #16
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    NA, I am not that tech-wise. I am trying to get a website together so that is in the works.
    You'll get a lot of good ideas (and see a lot of very amateurish designs as well) by visiting as many security company websites as possible before you launch anything, VO. Here again, a little expenditure with a website pro can be a wise use of your website funds and set you apart in terms of your image.

    Good luck!
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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    • #17
      Originally posted by SecTrainer
      I respectfully disagree. You advertise for a reason...not only to get the most qualified candidates in the door, but also to act as the first "filter" for those who are not qualified or who would not be interested in the job if they knew a little more about it.

      "Minimalist" ads that do not attract the people you want or advise others that they do not qualify are a false economy. Place an ad that not only provides the essential description of the job, but also the minimum absolute qualifications. Skilled employment advertising is not done along the lines of an actor's "cattle call" for a Broadway play. If all you're going to say is "Guard wanted - $9/hr", you could do as well standing on a downtown corner hollering for applicants...and that would be free.

      There are other ways to economize, or get the most bang for your buck. For instance, you're better off advertising some days than others or in some papers than others, etc. You'll do better with fewer, more informative ads carefully placed...and the cost difference won't be that great in the only terms that matter - dollars per qualified candidate - not dollars per the number of the "great unwashed" coming through your door.

      ..and remember, one of the things you want to do in your ad is not just to keep the unqualified away, but to SELL the job to the people you want. You don't do that with "Guard wanted - $9/hr". Emphasize the aspects of the job that are unique, interesting and/or challenging, as well as any special skills that might be desirable, even if not absolutely required - e.g., "..basic Spanish language skills helpful".

      Where you really waste money is in dealing with hordes of phone calls and unqualified candidates - even if it is only through the first prescreening stage. What's your time worth, or that of your secretary? Even one minute of contact with someone who isn't right for the job will cost you something, and while you can't hope to avoid it completely, you should try to minimize it every way you can.

      And whether your "probationary period" is three months or six, you need to develop a written policy statement about just what that means (there are many things it can't mean) and make sure you have a signed copy in the employee's file.
      You have a point, and I agree. Strangely enough, even the local police departments where I've lived put the following in their newspaper ads:
      DEPUTY SHERIFF
      Pinellas County is hiring for the
      position of DEPUTY SHERIFF -
      ROAD DEPUTY. Salary starts at
      $34,500. Applications accepted
      at 51000 Ulmerton Road, Largo.
      PCSO EOE
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by SecTrainer
        ValleyOne:

        Also note that testing can be a very useful part of the screening process.

        For instance, security companies are generally exempt from the federal law that prohibits most employers from using polygraph examinations for anything but situations involving the investigation of an established loss coupled with other evidence of possible employee involvement. State law may override the federal exemption, however.

        If there is no state prohibition, the polygraph can be used by security companies, particularly for applicants for security officer positions. I know of only two companies that use them, however, because of the expense and time involved.

        A number of companies use "honesty" tests, although their value is the subject of great debate and it seems counterintuitive to think that a liar would tell the truth in such a test, but the better ones are designed to check for lying.

        Finally, a number of companies use a few of other kinds of tests:
        • "Psychological profile" tests such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI in various forms). These tests look for any of a number of traits such as adaptability, sociability, mental disorders (depression, paranoia), sociopathy, etc. A slightly different form of "profile" test works differently. You start by giving the test to, say, 20 or 30 of your best people in a particular position (officer, say) to establish a "baseline" of what a desirable candidate's profile should look like, and then compare the results of applicants to that profile. This kind of testing has been used very successfully for sales and service positions.
        • "Intelligence" tests or tests of thinking ability and speed (the Basic LE test required for admission to Florida POST academies is of this type).
        • "Knowledge" tests. A company that is hiring individuals who have worked and previously trained elsewhere may wish to satisfy itself that the candidate does, in fact, know the appropriate state law, basic procedures, etc. that the previous training and experience would indicate. Companies that have done this have made amazing discoveries about the "training" that so-called "lateral entry" officers have received elsewhere.
        • Tests of physical skills - firearms, baton, OCP, keyboarding, etc.


        As a peripheral matter, it should also be noted that you can learn something about people merely by observing their attitudes about testing and their behaviors during testing. Are they annoyed about testing? Are they easily frustrated during tests? Do they perform the test in a "slapdash" manner? So, don't overlook this "secondary value" to be gained from including testing in your background process.

        And...one cautionary note: Any testing that is done must have some demonstrable relevance to the job for which the candidate is applying, and psychological/personality tests, in particular, should also have been independently verified ("validated"), meaning that the test has been proven to truly test what it claims to test. Any marketer of properly designed tests will be able to provide proof that the "validity" of the test has been properly established.
        Ahh, the MMPI; took it twice (first time: inconclusive ) What a pain in the butt. I prefer multiple interviews and past employer checks. People pass that test too many times even though they have issues.
        Last edited by Mr. Security; 02-03-2007, 10:35 AM.
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Mr. Security
          Ahh, the MMPI; took it twice (first time: inconclusive ) What a pain in the butt. I prefer multiple interviews and past employer checks. People pass that test too many times even though they have issues.
          I believe the MMPI-2 was developed in part because it did become apparent that some people had learned to manipulate the results. This was observed particularly when the MMPI was used on prison populations, for instance, to determine whether an inmate should be receiving treatment for certain sociopathic conditions.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

          Comment


          • #20
            Whether it's the MMPI-2, or 3 or 4 or even 5, these tests are similar to locks; Whatever can be created by man can be defeated by man...
            ~Super Ninja Sniper~
            Corbier's Commandos

            Nemo me impune lacessit

            Grammical and Spelling errors may occur form time to time. Yoov bin worned

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