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  • #16
    Most Security Saleries do depend on the nature of the work, type of oufit {Priviate, Contracted, or corporate} Corporate is the place to make any kind of money in my opinion. - Contracted Security isn't about taking care of thier officers, they're about beating out the competition, making money, and keeping thier business alive. - Priviate is what it is - Priviate.

    Example, I work in Corporate {Major Northeast Refinery Complex with an estimated 3500 employees} My department is charged not only with security but we are the EMTs, Firefighters, Rescue Technicians, and Hazzardous Material Technicians. Security is our main responsibility but as you can see we get involved in everything. My salary far outweighs the average security guard in that I have multiple responsibilities. I'm well taken care of - no doubt - I have a 25 year 100% Pension, 401K, Full Family Medical Plan, Profit Sharing {About $4000.00 Check every Year - Basically a bonus} all the equipment to do my job effectively {And if we need something we're given the credit card and told to go get it} - We have expense accounts for travel - Yes I'm a Security Officer but I have it pretty good including a brand new 2007 Ford F-150 Patrol Vehicle and work schedule that can't be beat.

    I also can be injured and/or killed faster than most security officers. Terrorisim is the main reason our unit was created - A Refinery is a dangerous place and we're more vulnerable than a bank, armored car, shopping mall, office building, maintenance yard, or truck scale where most security officers flurish. And we're not armed....Not yet.

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    • #17
      Wages with TWC/G4S are OK, but the benefits bite! One of the biggest issues is no sick pay. How many times I have gone to work feeling like crap and a few times I had to stay home. Got the flu twice in one month, that sucked.
      My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

      -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

      -It's just a job kid deal with it

      -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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      • #18
        Originally posted by exguard
        Most Security Saleries do depend on the nature of the work, type of oufit {Priviate, Contracted, or corporate} Corporate is the place to make any kind of money in my opinion. - Contracted Security isn't about taking care of thier officers, they're about beating out the competition, making money, and keeping thier business alive. - Priviate is what it is - Priviate.

        Example, I work in Corporate {Major Northeast Refinery Complex with an estimated 3500 employees} My department is charged not only with security but we are the EMTs, Firefighters, Rescue Technicians, and Hazzardous Material Technicians. Security is our main responsibility but as you can see we get involved in everything. My salary far outweighs the average security guard in that I have multiple responsibilities. I'm well taken care of - no doubt - I have a 25 year 100% Pension, 401K, Full Family Medical Plan, Profit Sharing {About $4000.00 Check every Year - Basically a bonus} all the equipment to do my job effectively {And if we need something we're given the credit card and told to go get it} - We have expense accounts for travel - Yes I'm a Security Officer but I have it pretty good including a brand new 2007 Ford F-150 Patrol Vehicle and work schedule that can't be beat.

        I also can be injured and/or killed faster than most security officers. Terrorisim is the main reason our unit was created - A Refinery is a dangerous place and we're more vulnerable than a bank, armored car, shopping mall, office building, maintenance yard, or truck scale where most security officers flurish. And we're not armed....Not yet.
        Are you hiring???

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        • #19
          On Occasion yes. - Training is our main thing - Our initial academy is 2 months. {Classroom, and field training. } You'll go through an annual physical, mask fit-testing, and SCBA Course including how to perform basic repairs.

          Right Now our Staffing is at it's peak with a waiting list of 135 applicants just from inside the refinery not to mention outside. - It's a pretty cool job. One I know I'll be around long enough to collect the pension {20 or 25 and out}

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          • #20
            Wages

            I work an armed position in Alaska on a two week on, two week off schedule with twelve hour shifts. As such, we work 40 hours straight time and 44 hours of time-and-a-half every work week. My base pay is in excess of $24 an hour not including locality pay or health insurance.

            I left a 13 year law enforcement career to come to this job as the pay was (and is) substantially more and the scedule includes two weeks off every month.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Here4th$
              I work an armed position in Alaska on a two week on, two week off schedule with twelve hour shifts. As such, we work 40 hours straight time and 44 hours of time-and-a-half every work week. My base pay is in excess of $24 an hour not including locality pay or health insurance.

              I left a 13 year law enforcement career to come to this job as the pay was (and is) substantially more and the scedule includes two weeks off every month.
              Good grief. Now that's good money.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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              • #22
                Good Money

                Yes, the money is good, but it's all about the time off. Two week a month works out to 6 months of time off per year.

                It's a pretty good gig.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Here4th$
                  Yes, the money is good, but it's all about the time off. Two week a month works out to 6 months of time off per year.

                  It's a pretty good gig.
                  I can't even imagine that type of job. Hold onto it tight.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #24
                    Yep the money sounds great but when I was up there a can of Coke was 10 cents in the lower 48 and a dollar in Alaska. The cost of living is much higher there unless things have changed dramatically.
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
                    http://www.boondocksaints.com/

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                    • #25
                      Cost of living

                      The cost of living in Alaska has changed dramatically from the exorbitant prices that people tell horror stories about. As long as you’re on the road system (I am) the prices of most things are comparable to those in the lower 48. I think gas in Anchorage is around $2.15/Gallon right now. I still have family in the states and we often find that the same Wally World, Safeway (Carrs), and Freddie’s newspaper and prices are used both here and in their stores there. There are some products that are higher, but I know that there are many that are the same and when on sale, even lower.

                      Here’s a small list of what I pay here:

                      Milk $3.00/Gallon
                      Bread $1.29/Loaf
                      King Crab Legs $8.99/Lb.
                      Apples $1.25/Lb
                      New York Strip Roasts $2.99/Lb (standard weekly special)
                      Ice Cream (Dryers) $3.00/1/2 Gallon

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                      • #26
                        Milk's a little higher than what we pay (Its Wisconsin, after all), but those seem pretty normal prices.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                        • #27
                          The cost of living is much higher in Connecticut than it is in Alaska.

                          Milk $3.50 and up
                          Bread $1.99
                          Ice Cream $3.99
                          Gasoline $2.25/gal (around average)

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