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Airport Security: Gap at the Gate story

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Popular media has shown us the "handcuff key," of the garden variety. Alot of people may not recongize a Zak tool, but they'll recongize it as a handcuff key the moment they see the key portion of the bottom.
    If you showed a handcuff key to a hundred people out on the street and ask them what kind of key it is, do you really believe that the majority would know what it is?

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    ....
    You also left out "criminal element," who knows exactly what a handcuff key looks like. Freedom.
    Actually, I left it out intentionally. It's obvious.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    There is no law against handcuff key posession in Florida. Only failure to disclose such, upon detention by a sworn law enforcement officer, is a compounding crime.

    There is an exemption for licensed security officers, bail enforcement agents, and other professions where handcuffs are part of the tools of that trade, in which a reasonable person might resonably expect to have a concealled handcuff key for self-defense purposes.

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  • Echos13
    replied
    TSA may frown on a key depending on who checks you I guess. But in Florida since the death of two detectives by a felon who had a key on a neck chain it's a state law now. Your in the custody of LE and fail to advise or refuse to advise you have a key and it's found on your person it's a 3rd degree felony. As for regular citizens it's rather a gray area. I see handcuffs hanging on car rear view mirrors a lot (makes you wonder about thier lifestyle). So it's possible to assume they have keys for them. So, as far as I can tell about the law (843.021 Unlawful possession of a concealed handcuff key) a "lawful" person of society can have one. But then, why would they have one? I have seen them made out of sterling silver necklaces before however.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    I would hope those in the business of airport screening would know the difference and at least ask why a passenger is in possession of one. Does that sound reasonable? I'd like to hear from the group, what is your opinion?
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Popular media has shown us the "handcuff key," of the garden variety. Alot of people may not recongize a Zak tool, but they'll recongize it as a handcuff key the moment they see the key portion of the bottom.


    You also left out "criminal element," who knows exactly what a handcuff key looks like. Freedom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002
    Many people? If someone doesn't know what a handcuff key looks like, they must of lived a very sheltered life.
    You know, there IS a reason why I used the word many instead of most. I think that you will agree with me that many people do not work in LE, security, and the like (and I'm not interested in discussing other inappropriate reasons for using......). Therefore, it's logical to conclude that there are many people who do not have a clue what a handcuff key looks like. And I think that I'm not going out on a limb when I say that they would not agree with you about living a very sheltered life.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Many people wouldn't know what a handcuff key looks like anyway. I wouldn't worry about it the next time.
    Many people? If someone doesn't know what a handcuff key looks like, they must of lived a very sheltered life.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Serpico
    ....I had left a handcuff key on my key chain. TSA didn't say anything about it.
    Many people wouldn't know what a handcuff key looks like anyway. I wouldn't worry about it the next time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serpico
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I have to ask, why? Most airlines use flexible or field expdient restraints. FAMs will simply shoot you (heh) if your a deadly threat. They're after possible weapons, mostly.
    I don't know. Just seemed odd, I guess.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Serpico
    After flying to and from Detroit, I realized that I had left a handcuff key on my key chain. TSA didn't say anything about it. Maybe I'm making too much out of it, but I'd think that would be a serious problem.
    I have to ask, why? Most airlines use flexible or field expdient restraints. FAMs will simply shoot you (heh) if your a deadly threat. They're after possible weapons, mostly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serpico
    replied
    After flying to and from Detroit, I realized that I had left a handcuff key on my key chain. TSA didn't say anything about it. Maybe I'm making too much out of it, but I'd think that would be a serious problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    My own local airport, Kenosha Regional, required a senator to lobby DHS for grant money to put up security fencing. Its finally up, 1 year after it was supposed to be. For months, it was lying in bundles around the perimeter of the airport.

    The airport is a "medium sized" charter, from what I can see. It is not classified as a target. However, a stone's throw away from it (and us) is Zion Nuclear Power Station, a station that's been decomissioned but still has nuclear material.
    There is no shortage of possible targets. That's a fact. The point is that a general aviation aircraft has NEVER been used as a terrorist weapon. The same can't be said for the airliners. If the public wants to worry about the method used to deliver a terrorist attack, they would be better off focusing on the vehicles I've already mentioned.

    All the hoopla generated by the media every time there is a no-fly-zone- incident just capitalizes on the public's fears and give politicians an opportunity to look good because they get to sound-off about how concerned they are about this "awful, needless threat." Meanwhile, the real threats continue to be overlooked.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    My own local airport, Kenosha Regional, required a senator to lobby DHS for grant money to put up security fencing. Its finally up, 1 year after it was supposed to be. For months, it was lying in bundles around the perimeter of the airport.

    The airport is a "medium sized" charter, from what I can see. It is not classified as a target. However, a stone's throw away from it (and us) is Zion Nuclear Power Station, a station that's been decomissioned but still has nuclear material.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    I'm going to go out on somewhat of a tangent regarding airport safety. As a private pilot, my gripe is with the media who continue to 'feed the flames' of panic with the general public about general aviation aircraft being used for terrorist attacks. Granted, there have been some highly publicized cases where pilots who were lost inadvertently flew into restricted airspace. Remember though, that one of those aircraft that emptied the capital was a state governor's.

    I would like to see a law passed that requires active security at ALL airports. Even so, the risk of terrorist using a container ship, truck, or van is far greater than using a small slow-moving aircraft that has a limited payload.

    When an airspace violation does occur, the FAA should be the agency that has the jurisdiction to investigate and, if necessary, make the arrest. Local authorities may have to detain the violator(s), but ultimately the FAA needs to assert its jurisdiction and handle the enforcement issues.

    Just a thought.

    Leave a comment:

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