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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    On at least one of the job boards that I monitor, the number of current openings requiring any of the ASIS certs has actually dropped, but of course that could just be a momentary thing. However, I do notice that the required years of experience seems to have increased somewhat.

    Leave a comment:


  • FireControlman
    replied
    Well, after revisiting this thread several times, I aquired a large file of study material this afternoon as part of my first step in attaining the CPP certification. A close associate and I will more than likely set the end of this year as our deadline for this credential.

    We'll see...

    Leave a comment:


  • ThrilloftheVO
    replied
    There's no question that the CPP has gained greater and greater acceptance and may eventually become a prerequisite for some jobs.

    I just finished the CPP review course a couple of weeks ago and submitted my application to take the test a couple of days later. I'm still waiting to hear back from ASIS for my test date.

    Wish me luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • cmndr
    replied
    Originally posted by burley View Post
    Since my last rant about the CPP designation I thought I should post an update. I attended a CPP study group from January - April 2008 and then wrote the exam in May 2008 and passed (thank goodness). Since then I've noticed that some major job postings in Canada have required a CPP designation in addition to university degrees.

    While I still believe that ASIS has developed this brilliant marketing stategy, I've found the Protection of Assets Manuals are a very good research medium for industrial security issues. And, my mgmt. seems to pay attention to my comments when I cite ASIS' standards. Soooo, I proved myself somewhat wrong.
    I believe you and I were in the same group. This was held at TSM, yes? Like you, I have also noted an increase in the number of positions that require the CPP. I wrote and passed in July 2008, then I wrote and passed the PCI in November 2008 and I am going to write the PSP in April this year. While I was skeptical at first about the value of these designations, I have found that my career has taken off like a rocket since last July. We are getting more business opportunities as more and more exisiting and prospective clients are mandating that their contractors have management and field staff that hold certifications.

    In fact the City of Toronto has just made CPO (IFPO) mandatory for all contracted and in-house corporate security staff, supervisory staff have to have at least the SSMP/CSSM and the Manager of Corporate Security has mandated that his management staff must also obtain one of the designations from ASIS. It is really beginning to catch on around here.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    Originally posted by burley View Post
    Since my last rant about the CPP designation I thought I should post an update. I attended a CPP study group from January - April 2008 and then wrote the exam in May 2008 and passed (thank goodness). Since then I've noticed that some major job postings in Canada have required a CPP designation in addition to university degrees.

    While I still believe that ASIS has developed this brilliant marketing stategy, I've found the Protection of Assets Manuals are a very good research medium for industrial security issues. And, my mgmt. seems to pay attention to my comments when I cite ASIS' standards. Soooo, I proved myself somewhat wrong.
    Thank you for the update and the honesty. Obviously "you will not take know for an answer" does not apply to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • burley
    replied
    POST CPP exam

    Since my last rant about the CPP designation I thought I should post an update. I attended a CPP study group from January - April 2008 and then wrote the exam in May 2008 and passed (thank goodness). Since then I've noticed that some major job postings in Canada have required a CPP designation in addition to university degrees.

    While I still believe that ASIS has developed this brilliant marketing stategy, I've found the Protection of Assets Manuals are a very good research medium for industrial security issues. And, my mgmt. seems to pay attention to my comments when I cite ASIS' standards. Soooo, I proved myself somewhat wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • BailBondInvestigator
    replied
    Originally posted by burley View Post
    This is not going to be a popular opinion but I have to say, has anyone ever questioned the huge marketing and money-making cash cow that ASIS has implemented under the guise of a professional "security designation"? Yes you have to read about 11 books and pass a 200+ question test but c'mon, I can see adding a degree designation beside my name but a Security organization's concocted designation? Those with a "real" degree would see this designation as laughable. Sorry to those who have undertaken to obtain the ASIS designation. I too will be expected to read the books and take the test in 2007, as my company wants me to evaluate the program. I expect to see a barrage of criticism to this comment...I have big shoulders.
    No criticism here at all!! The only value in the CPP/PSP/CPI designations are the fact that they have already taken off and are considered worthy by the Executive rentacop old boy network which carries MAJOR influence. You can argue validity but not reality.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Originally posted by mike booth
    I'm letting my PSP lapse. I did not renew my ASIS membership. .
    For the 12 (?) credits needed over 3 years to maintain your PSP, it may be easy to keep. Membership is not required anyway.

    Your choice of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike booth
    replied
    I'm letting my PSP lapse. I did not renew my ASIS membership. I'm very dissapointed in the organization after trying very hard to participate and contribute. I would not reccomend membership or certification to anyone unless they are in a market where membership and certification is common. ASIS is not relevant to every segment of the security market, they just think they are.

    Leave a comment:


  • stevesurf
    replied
    As stated before, a very informative thread; I'll try to make my first post here a decent one!

    Originally posted by mike booth
    Why should I spend several hundred dollars a year to earn certification with an organization my clients don't recognize?
    I get asked this a good deal at ASIS Workshops; even though I am currently working toward my Board Certification, it may not be an appropriate one for an individual. Is it possible there may be influencers in the OP's business circle that have a positive opinion of the certification and are not expressing it? If this is the case, the education value of the certification process alone need be considered. The process of getting a CPP or even PSP can involve some very positive interaction where you'll learn alongside diverse industry professionals.

    About six years ago, when I first began conducting workshops for ASIS, I was very technology driven. Today, I am far more focused on the needs of the end users and consultants that attend these sessions than ever before. The ASIS Education Programs almost always involve collaboration, whether it is on a Chapter, Council, Committee, Industry Group or even via the web site itself. The programs have really changed my focus for the positive.

    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You realize this certification is relatively ancient, and that ASIS membership is restricted to managers and owners of security companies, right?
    Actually, there are many successful Security Consultants that are board certified. Many end users require this as a prerequisite to hiring a Physical Security Consultant. Membership is not limited to just managers and owners...

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Originally posted by james2go30
    Whenever we get a new officer I don't know If I should advise them about my company or let them find out the hard way like I did...stuck on this one.
    Train / advise them on the correct and safe way to do things, leave the rest out.

    Leave a comment:


  • james2go30
    replied
    Sounds familiar

    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Thankfully, I don't have to deal with clients like that. The concept of keeping a client while watching your employees abandon ship is horrifying, because the client's not going to replace the lost man-hours and training wages you paid out for those perfectly good employees.
    My company would rather keep the client while the employees abandon ship...my company has a hight turn-over rate...and some of the officers I have seen leave this company are pretty bright and experienced...some them I didn't want to see go cause I wanted to learn from them...but they did and I can't blame them having thoughts of it myself...but not too many security companies in panama city to choose from...thinking about mall security. Oh yea while the good ones leave we keeping the brain dead ones. Whenever we get a new officer I don't know If I should advise them about my company or let them find out the hard way like I did...stuck on this one.

    Leave a comment:


  • CAR54
    replied
    Very informative topic.

    The company I'm with recently introduced a "pay for skills" based on the IFPO program. Honestly I'd never heard of the IFPO until it was recently unveiled at my work place. The company will be basing an officers pay on how many levels they've completed, and been tested on, in the program. And the company will be paying for each module and all the materials. So if an officer is motivated and good at taking tests they can advance fairly quickly.

    Unfortunately many of the officers have been with this company for some time and are making well over what the pay for skills program starts at, and also don't like taking tests, so they've been notified unless they can quickly reach the correct level in the pay for skills program their pay will be cut (ouch).

    Since I just started and I'm making the minimum amount at this company I think it's a great idea, course I'm in the minority.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by RJ Martin
    Additionally, when writing and getting published, the CPP designation lends significant credibility in the eye of the public (the non-initiated in security) and the press.
    Very good point!

    Leave a comment:


  • RJ Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    Thank you for that perspective, Mr. Martin. Perhaps you wouldn't mind commenting more specifically on how you feel the CPP has been beneficial to you (or your business)?
    Without belaboring my opinion, I can add that when clients are looking for help to resolve a myriad of security related problems, the CPP designation has been a deciding factor in them calling my firm (direct quote from the clients) as opposed to calling any other firm who did not have the credentials.

    Additionally, when writing and getting published, the CPP designation lends significant credibility in the eye of the public (the non-initiated in security) and the press.

    I reiterate my original point, "that if you intend to stay within the securiyt field long-term" the CPP is a wise choice - at a minimum - it will not hurt your career!

    Leave a comment:

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