Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

To CPP or not to CPP

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • To CPP or not to CPP

    Are there very many CPO's or CPP's on this site?

    I have been able to get both, a college diploma, and still not drink tea with a raised pinky.


    Always watch which toes you step on during the walk up, just in case they are still there during any unexpected falls.....
    Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
    Groucho Marx

  • #2
    I would like to get a CPP eventually. I have already read 3 of the books on the reading list, but I just started a Master's Degree program this month so I am going to finish up my degree first then start working on the CPP.

    Comment


    • #3
      look at the costs to get a CPP

      This is not going to be a popular opinion but I have to say, has anyone ever questioned the huge marketing and money-making cash cow that ASIS has implemented under the guise of a professional "security designation"? Yes you have to read about 11 books and pass a 200+ question test but c'mon, I can see adding a degree designation beside my name but a Security organization's concocted designation? Those with a "real" degree would see this designation as laughable. Sorry to those who have undertaken to obtain the ASIS designation. I too will be expected to read the books and take the test in 2007, as my company wants me to evaluate the program. I expect to see a barrage of criticism to this comment...I have big shoulders.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have my CPP and am also working on my Master's degree. I am seeing more companies here in Canada looking for personnel with this designation so it depends upon the value placed on it by your company or potential employer.

        Comment


        • #5
          I for one would expect to hear pro and con. The designation is not for everyone, just like college and university may not be the best fit in someones mental ability, time constraints or money situation etc.
          The program is not the money maker you think it is, but is intended for mid career folks.
          Talk with someone looking for work, are they not trying to have a bit more than the next guy to land that job? Designations are included more and more on company job boards.
          This designation and CISSP for example demand time in the role as well as a test. (passing mark above 70%)



          Originally posted by burley
          This is not going to be a popular opinion but I have to say, has anyone ever questioned the huge marketing and money-making cash cow that ASIS has implemented under the guise of a professional "security designation"? Yes you have to read about 11 books and pass a 200+ question test but c'mon, I can see adding a degree designation beside my name but a Security organization's concocted designation? Those with a "real" degree would see this designation as laughable. Sorry to those who have undertaken to obtain the ASIS designation. I too will be expected to read the books and take the test in 2007, as my company wants me to evaluate the program. I expect to see a barrage of criticism to this comment...I have big shoulders.
          Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
          Groucho Marx

          Comment


          • #6
            I have never heard a company asking for it in Quebec.

            Along with Police Technology, Emergency Medical Technician programs in colleges I've been trained in firefighting, emergency communications & rescue with Civil Protection. In the late 80's I wrote the challenge exam from the Education Institute of the American Hotel & Motel Association in Hotel/Motel Security Management. I passed "With Honors" without taking the classes

            I'd like to take the new Certified Hotel Security Director's exam from the now named American Hotel & Lodging Association. I'd be able to put the letters CHSD after my name. Not that it would help me career wise since I'm too old to be changing jobs! But it too is expensive.
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

            Comment


            • #7
              Cpp

              Excellent thread...here is my two cents. I obtained my CPP designation in May of this year. A certification that I worked on for nearly two years. I have a bachelor's degree to compliment my certification with plans to obtain my MBA or master's in Security Management. I work in the Corporate Security Department of Fortune 500 company; so every bit of education I have and additional training and expertise I garner through various sources helps keep me competitive.

              I understand the controversy surrounding the CPP program, but it's not just about passing a test and hanging your certificate on the wall. ASIS requires you recertify every three years (unlike many certification programs) which is a combination of Membership, Education Programs and Courses, Instruction, Speeches, and Presentations, Publications, Public Service, and continuous self study, education, program and volunteer service. In other words, you must continue to grow professionally and stay involved becoming the most effective security practitioner you can and remain current with trends in the industry.

              This is not to say that those without it are not doing what I just outlined in their security careers. There should be a standard and if I were looking for someone to hire to work in my Corporate Security Department, they would have a degree and would have a CPP, CFE, or in the process of seeking the designation.

              If we as an industry expect to move security forward as a respected career field that pays its practitioners well and rewards them for their expertise, we must insist on minimum standards that are stringent enough to exclude those who are marginal performers. All of us know how technical the career field has become and there are many skills that a security professional brings to the table that are outlined in the areas a CPP is tested on; such as Security Principles, Business Principles, Personnel Security, Physical Security, Information Security, Emergency Practices, Investigations, and Legal Aspects. I can assure you that the CPP exam is much more difficult than most of you realize and if you do not know the material and how to apply it in scenario based situations you are not going to pass the test.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, I believe the path to professionalism should include base levels of knowledge across the board. We are getting there slowly, but with an increase in college classes etc. it is getting better. A problem still exists with clients and maybe sales trying to get clients, offering low bids.

                The CPP exam was easier than the stories I heard over the years. But all I had to do was be in a study group for 3 months, prepare and present one book/subject and remember what the others were presenting as well.
                Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                Groucho Marx

                Comment


                • #9
                  I didn't renew my ASIS membership last year. I'm not recertifying my PSP this year. ASIS hasn't done anything for me. My clientele has never heard of ASIS, the CPP, PSP or the other new certification. I tried promoting ASIS locally. It's easier to promote my business. I tried to work with ASIS to promote them locally. I was not impressed with their poor communication and lack of organization. Their are industry segements and employers where ASIS membership is valuable and where the certification helps. It isn't for everyone.
                  Booth

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The security industry is fragmented and rightfully stereotyped by poorly trained individuals. (Not across the board of course, there are a few of us that have taken the effort to truly learn the job, but industrywide most aren't)

                    Even receiving tons of training from a company doesn't mean much as many companies offer tons of worthless training. The CPP designation is an industry standard. Everyone in the industry knows what it means and what knowledge it demonstrates.

                    If you are looking for another run of the mill entry type job, the CPP designation may help a bit, but is nothing earthshattering if you don't have it. However, when you start applying for Corporate Security Manager positions, or other high level spots, the other applicants will have the CPP designation next to their name. And the BS, maybe a MS, and maybe even an XFBI. Those are a lot of letters to compete with.

                    Whether it is fair or not, whether it is ASIS's way of making money or not, at some point you need to play their game if you want the top jobs.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good points but, only in the industries that ASIS caters to and they do not have a lock on all the industries. They act like they have no regard for any industry that doesn't recognise ASIS as the gold standard. There are some big industries out there that have no idea who ASIS is. ASIS doesn't seem to be doing anything to crack those industries. On the contrary, their attitude suggest they feel the ASIS members who are in those industries should be educating their industries as to the benefits of ASIS. This while selling membership as the industry standard.

                      In particular, my specialty, Cultural Property Protction and Executive Protection are very poorly served by ASIS. None of my clients have ever heard of ASIS. I find my self spending as much time promoting ASIS as I spend promoting my business

                      Why should I spend several hundred dollars a year to earn certification with an organization my clients don't recognize? Why should I spend more money to promote that organization? And why should I promote an organization that sandbags my promotional efforts when I have a successful track record?
                      Booth

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cpp

                        What is Cultural Property Protection?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Szorcsik001
                          The security industry is fragmented and rightfully stereotyped by poorly trained individuals. (Not across the board of course, there are a few of us that have taken the effort to truly learn the job, but industrywide most aren't)

                          Even receiving tons of training from a company doesn't mean much as many companies offer tons of worthless training. The CPP designation is an industry standard. Everyone in the industry knows what it means and what knowledge it demonstrates.

                          If you are looking for another run of the mill entry type job, the CPP designation may help a bit, but is nothing earthshattering if you don't have it. However, when you start applying for Corporate Security Manager positions, or other high level spots, the other applicants will have the CPP designation next to their name. And the BS, maybe a MS, and maybe even an XFBI. Those are a lot of letters to compete with.

                          Whether it is fair or not, whether it is ASIS's way of making money or not, at some point you need to play their game if you want the top jobs.
                          CPP for an entry-level position is probably going to mark you as overqualified and/or lacking self-confidence. However, I agree with your post when it comes to management positions and the like.
                          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mike booth
                            In particular, my specialty, Cultural Property Protction and Executive Protection are very poorly served by ASIS. None of my clients have ever heard of ASIS. I find my self spending as much time promoting ASIS as I spend promoting my business

                            Why should I spend several hundred dollars a year to earn certification with an organization my clients don't recognize? Why should I spend more money to promote that organization? And why should I promote an organization that sandbags my promotional efforts when I have a successful track record?
                            ASIS is not a universal protection services organization. There are holes. Just be aware of who your potential clients are, and whether or not it may be useful. Executive Protection for celebrities, CPP means nothing. If you are looking at Corporate EP, they have been well trained by ASIS that CPP is important. (Truth or not, perception is reality)

                            The question here is not whether or not the CPP designation means you are better qualified, because in all honesty, you are the same person after taking the test as you were before. (Unless studying for it taught you a lot) The question is whether you will be perceived to be more qualified. In corporate circles, the answer is a resounding yes. Outside the corporate world...it's hit and miss.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mdb
                              What is Cultural Property Protection?
                              That generally refers to protection of artwork, museums, historical documents, etc. Cultural Property Protection is not CPP, which is the Certified Protection Professional designation from ASIS Int'l. Just so things are clear on that point.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X