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Security and Tasers: New Police Exec. Rules Issued

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  • Security and Tasers: New Police Exec. Rules Issued

    According to Officer.com article on a police executive group's recomendations on taser use, officers should be using the taser in five second cycles, only one taser per strike, and only for active resisters.

    As we all know, the X26c taser has a 10 second duty cycle, with a double pull of the trigger going to 30 second duty cycle. This is designed specifically so that you can drop the taser and run away from the threat - not to close the gap and physically restrain the target as the X26 is designed for.

    The M series taser still retains its five second cycle, with additional "on time" by holding down the trigger.

    So, today's question: Who will hold security companies using the X26c to the standard of law enforcement agencies using the X26, and is it a fair comparison to do so?

    I've already heard of one instance in Florida where a private security company was required to submit their use of force policy to the local police chief and sheriff, their taser instruction policy to the local police chief and sheriff, and have a Taser International Certified LE Trainer train their employees. Notice I said nothing about the State of Florida Division of Ag and Consumer Services, who licenses security in the state, they didn't care, since its legal to carry a taser openly as a citizen in Florida.

    I'm still not sure why the security company even bothered jumping through those hoops, the law authorizes citizens to carry taser electric weapons at a state level, there is no preemption by the local LE.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

  • #2
    Thats interesting that a police chief is even concerned with how a TASER is used by security guards. For one thing, as you said, he has no authority over the use of a X26c. However, TASER will provide a certified instructor for those civilians who buy a X26c from them.

    Secondly, Why would a security company expect their officers to Tase someone then run to safety. If the guards are unarmed, I understand, but why issue a TASER to an unarmed guard? Better to give it to an armed guard and let him take the person into custody during that 30 second cycle.

    Also, the 5 second cycle then evaluate, is only a recommendation at this time. Either the State of Florida regulates the TASER for guards, or they don't. The use of force policy is always good to have on hand anyway though.
    Jerry
    http://personalprotectionconcepts.info

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jmaccauley
      Thats interesting that a police chief is even concerned with how a TASER is used by security guards. For one thing, as you said, he has no authority over the use of a X26c. However, TASER will provide a certified instructor for those civilians who buy a X26c from them.

      Secondly, Why would a security company expect their officers to Tase someone then run to safety. If the guards are unarmed, I understand, but why issue a TASER to an unarmed guard? Better to give it to an armed guard and let him take the person into custody during that 30 second cycle.

      Also, the 5 second cycle then evaluate, is only a recommendation at this time. Either the State of Florida regulates the TASER for guards, or they don't. The use of force policy is always good to have on hand anyway though.
      It was St. Petersburg Police, if that tells you anything. I think they were having to jump through hoops to get X26s, and the local police chief was one of those hoops, but this may of been after Taser stopped selling X26s to security companies.

      I have no idea why a security company would, but with the way the system is designed on the X26c, how easy is it for the X26c double pull to be inadvertantly activated? We're seeing on-times from police officers of 27, 30 seconds for the X26, as well - in 5 second increments till someone turns the unit to interrupting the cycle. That's one of the major wonders I have, how will that 10 second and 30 second cycle affect tasers?

      I know of at least one company that wants to issue tasers to unarmed security officers, especially on sites that won't allow firearms but the risk level is high enough to warrant lethal force. They were seeing it from the liability factor, the owner's first words were, "Replace all the guns!" Yeah, with a single shot electric weapon with a max distance of 15 feet.

      The ONLY thing Florida regulates is the firearm. Anything else on their belts, the state dosen't care about.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        A Taser Is Cosidered Lethal Force?
        "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bigdog
          A Taser Is Cosidered Lethal Force?
          No, a Taser is considered non-lethal force (DOD/USMC defintion).

          I was saying: The company's belief was that sites where the client is afraid of the liability, or simply hates, firearms would welcome something like the Taser. If someone acts up, is violent, they can be put down with the taser, and everyone walks away. This makes insurance companies happy, the client is happy, the officer is happy he has something to defend himself with, and the suspect didn't get 3 9mm to the chest and head.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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