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Why wear ID badges /Photo Id's?

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by exguard
    We do have temporary badges and vehicle hang tags that we'll issue for those who either forget their ID or loose it. - If it's lost we have the ability to disable the badge and send the person to our processing center for a new one {at a $25.00 replacement fee of course}

    What we enforce is the office employee or member of management staff who leaves the badge on thier desk or in thier brief case and is found walking around with out it or in the cafeteria with out a badge. Or the Plant Employee who doesn't properly display the badge while working inside the facility {Units, Tank Farms, bolier houses, docks, pump rooms, etc...}

    Our outside contractors are another complete nightmare. They have issued ID badges as well and don't understand their importance until we end up disabling it for one reason or another.
    exguard:
    Re: outside contractors. That is a failure of the refinery management and their security director to properly educate outside contractor managers on the importance of proper identification. We live in a different era and that means radical thinking for many layabout management.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • exguard
    replied
    We do have temporary badges and vehicle hang tags that we'll issue for those who either forget their ID or loose it. - If it's lost we have the ability to disable the badge and send the person to our processing center for a new one {at a $25.00 replacement fee of course}

    What we enforce is the office employee or member of management staff who leaves the badge on thier desk or in thier brief case and is found walking around with out it or in the cafeteria with out a badge. Or the Plant Employee who doesn't properly display the badge while working inside the facility {Units, Tank Farms, bolier houses, docks, pump rooms, etc...}

    Our outside contractors are another complete nightmare. They have issued ID badges as well and don't understand their importance until we end up disabling it for one reason or another.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Any security program, other than government, must have a procedure for dealing with executives who might forget their badge. Many corporations will issue a temporary badge through the security department when the human factor, i.e. forgetfulness, occurs.

    Security in not compromised by such an arrangement. Records will track habitual offenders and appropriate discipline is administered as required.
    Yes, that's true. Procedures for dealing with such situations are precisely part of "the ID protocol" that I'm referring to - as well as the procedures for how badges are issued generally, how they are retired, etc. All of those things are part of the ID protocol.

    However, what cannot be permitted is that the executive be allowed to simply wander around without ID merely because he forgot it. If that is happening, then the ID system IS indeed compromised, as I said.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Hotel guest don't normally wear id (Sometimes organized groups make their people wear wrist bands).
    Of course not...but if employees are expected to do so, then they should always be required to do so, no exceptions.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Zero-Tolerance Policies

    Any security program, other than government, must have a procedure for dealing with executives who might forget their badge. Many corporations will issue a temporary badge through the security department when the human factor, i.e. forgetfulness, occurs.

    Security in not compromised by such an arrangement. Records will track habitual offenders and appropriate discipline is administered as required.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Hotel guest don't normally wear id (Sometimes organized groups make their people wear wrist bands).

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by exguard
    Excecutives at our facility expect the policy enforced.....We as the Protection Department enforce those rules and make reports on the violators even if their in top management. We have a zero tolerance policy especially being a Refinery and all the extra Security after 9-11
    Whether it's a refinery, school or steel mill, organizational executives must be taught that both personal ID and vehicle registration requirements and procedures *must* be treated as zero-tolerance programs in order to have any real (predictable) value whatsoever. Any compromise in enforcement is, in effect, total compromise (how many attackers does it take to drop off a bomb, or shoot up the cafeteria? Answer: ONE!). Ask one of them that question, and if they can't figure out the answer...tell them. Let them know that they're just wasting their money if they're really just joking about these programs...and this is one of those cases where you're either dead serious about the issue or you're just kidding. There's no "headroom" or "tolerance" for sloppiness.

    Would these same executives allow the accounts receivable people to bill customers whenever they "felt like it" or whenever they happened to "remember" to do so? Would it be okay for the safety people to deal with a leak in a chlorine tank according to set procedure if someone just "happened to notice it", "happened to know about the procedure", or wasn't "just too busy to bother about that right now"? Absurd ideas, yes, but no more absurd than running a sloppy ID program.

    The design of every different type of ID presumes or dictates that certain specific procedures will be followed in how they're worn, displayed, swiped, etc. These design parameters are what they are, whether anyone likes it or not, and so the procedures required because of the design features must be observed...all the time, and without exception. If the photo is of such a size that it can only be checked by handing it to the security officer for examination, for instance, well...that's just the way it is. No one's wishes, hopes, preferences, laziness or indifference will change the size of the photo. This suggests that you think about these procedural implications of ID design before you select an ID system.

    A poorly-selected, poorly-enforced, poorly-managed ID program is infinitely WORSE than no ID program at all, for reasons that should be obvious even to naive company executives. So, Mr. Business Executive, the message is this: When your risk profile dictates the use of IDs, make up your mind right from the get-go that it must be done right and strictly enforced (including you, sir!) or you've wasted lots of money without reducing your liability one iota.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-09-2007, 08:28 AM.

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  • exguard
    replied
    Where Im at.....Major Northeast Refinery with Thousands of Employees the ID Badge is the time card - If you leave it at home or in the car you don't get into the complex....All gates are ID Badge Controlled and just about all the internal buildings, offices, gates, Etc. operate on the ID Badge so we raley have problems.

    A good percentage of the contract employees {Pipe Fitters, Steam Fitters, Line Workers, Unit Operators, Processers, and mechanics have to have the ID Badge as a time card.....They badge in at a turn-style and badge out at a turn-style

    Excecutives at our facility expect the policy enforced.....We as the Protection Department enforce those rules and make reports on the violators even if their in top management. We have a zero tolerance policy especially being a Refinery and all the extra Security after 9-11

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Fbi Id

    Speaking of ID, has anyone looked at the X-files FBI ID's sold on E-bay? They look so real that I would have a difficult time distinguishing it from the real thing. To me, it appears to be a security risk since they could easily be tampered with. I'm surprised E-bay allows it.

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  • EMTjon
    replied
    We deal with it too.

    Corprate Policy says that employees must display their ID at all times. It also says that the ID card and proximity access card should be kept seperate... which no one does.

    Many employees wear their ID and prox card together, on a retratable lanyard, at their waistline. Problem is - if they are wearing any sort of coat or jacket, it is covered.

    As Security, our lobby officers are supposed to challenge all coming in for ID, and just verify they are carrying something that looks similar to an ID badge from 15+ feet away. We are supposed to challenge EVEN IF they hit their prox card coming in.

    As for vehicle permits - ours are custom made, but DO NOT have any corprate ID on them... just a big letter and a unique 5-digit number. Re-issuing the permits last time was a royal pain (I coordinated it) and it took about 2 months.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    It also requires you wear a nametag or identifying number on the outermost garment of your uniform, but people can't seem to follow that RL rule.
    You are correct. Thanks for pointing that out.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Special Investigator
    Here in Wisconsin, the Dept of Regulation & Licensing REQUIRES private investigators & private security personal to carry on their person a photo ID while on duty.
    It also requires you wear a nametag or identifying number on the outermost garment of your uniform, but people can't seem to follow that RL rule.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Here in Wisconsin, the Dept of Regulation & Licensing REQUIRES private investigators & private security personal to carry on their person a photo ID while on duty.

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  • DizZy SO
    replied
    I used to work as order filler at an auto distribution center and all employees were required to wear ID badges. You needed the ID to get in the building and to punch in and out. Most people would wear it visibly in the start and end of the shift that’s the only time security was in the building the rest of the time they were in the guard shack and employees would have their ID in their pockets.

    At the site I work at now you need the ID badge to gain access if not the lobby officer will stop you and not let you in, if the employee continues to refuse, which they usually don’t, the shift supervisor will come out and take over the situation. ID is needed all over the site to enter different buildings and rooms. As security we must also wear ID. Policy states that all employees and contractors must wear ID badges while on the property between the neck and waist.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I think his duties are more emergency response to accidents as an EMT, and they threw the security duties in extra.
    Nathan this may be nothing more than Security Theater. What an absolute shame. What I can't figure out is just why sit in a guard shack instead of in the building where the real action may occur?
    Warm regards,
    Bill

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