Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rank Structure

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I'll be that guy.

    Separate your Business side from your Guard side.

    You only need two ranks.

    GUARD

    and

    GUARD SUPERVISOR

    Anything above that is most likely going to be a management position, and that's a business operations thing, not a guard thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    We clank a lot down here in the States too, HS. It's from all that "change" that Obama promised us...and sure enough, that's all he's left us with.
    Us liberals up here hear it differemtly. The clank is from the mess Bush left for Obama to clean up.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    It's not the medals. Canada replaced it's $1 & $2 bills with coins many years ago. The noise is from all the change in my pockets, from tips delivering towels to rooms etc.

    NOTE to visitors from France & Britain: Tipping is not something that only canoes do.
    We clank a lot down here in the States too, HS. It's from all that "change" that Obama promised us...and sure enough, that's all he's left us with.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    First, I can now reveal that I ran a black-bag operation on HotelSec not long ago and can swear that the uniform he wears is accurately depicted in the photo. You can hear his medals clanking when he gets off the elevator.
    It's not the medals. Canada replaced it's $1 & $2 bills with coins many years ago. The noise is from all the change in my pockets, from tips delivering towels to rooms etc.

    NOTE to visitors from France & Britain: Tipping is not something that only canoes do.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    First, I can now reveal that I ran a black-bag operation on HotelSec not long ago and can swear that the uniform he wears is accurately depicted in the photo. You can hear his medals clanking when he gets off the elevator.

    I'm pretty much in line with Nauticus here, especially with respect to using standard corporate operational titles. Technically speaking, the rank of "Colonel" is often given to the Chief of Police, but I'm not wild about using military-style ranks at all in security, much less for corporate positions. There are a number of reasons for this, although there are also some exceptions - especially quasi-police organizations such as campus Public Safety.

    You can also implement "grades" within "ranks". Ranks should be tied to unique pay scales, and grades would then be tied to steps within the pay scale for a given rank. People would not be advanced to a higher grade within a rank merely because of longevity; they have to meet other criteria as well (for instance: time-in-grade + performance minimums + training). However, they could receive longevity increases (up to a point) within a given grade.

    For instance, here we have three grades within the rank of Security Officer:

    Security Officer: Pay Scale 9.63/hr - 13.42/hr
    * Security Officer I: 9.63/hr starting, up to 10.50 (longevity increases are allowed within grade)
    * Security Officer II: 10.85/hr starting, up to 12.00 (ditto)
    * Security Officer III: 12.20/hr, up to 13.42 (ditto)

    Note the gaps. Being promoted to the next grade bumps your pay. You don't bring a lower grade's pay scale up to within a penny of the higher grade's starting pay, because that destroys incentive to move up a grade (if there's only a penny difference between top end of lower grade and low end of higher grade).

    There may be other "perks" associated with grades within ranks. For instance, Security Officer III's are given first choice of vacation schedule, then Security Officer II's, etc. Or, when day shift openings come up, the SO-III's would get first refusal, then SO-II, etc. Then, WITHIN A GRADE, you resolve conflicts on the basis of seniority. An employee who has remained at Grade I for 15 years due to his personal laziness and disengagement in his career would NOT get priority on vacation/scheduling choices over any Grade II officer, regardless of the old goof's time with the company.

    You can use a variety of uniform designations/insignia to indicate an officer's rank and grade. For instance, instead of traditional PFC/corporal/sgt "stripes", use sleeve hashes, name pin ("Security Officer III" below name), patch over right shirt pocket, etc. Supervisors get gold bling instead of silver, that kind of thing. These things add a bit to your total uniform costs, but they PAY THEMSELVES BACK in officer pride.

    You can do the same thing with supervisors, etc.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-27-2011, 11:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nauticus
    replied
    My two cents...

    Your technique may be good, but I like the following:

    Issue ranks to field operations. Guards, Agents, Site Supervisors, Field Supervisors, and Operations Supervisors (add whichever set of ranks you wish; the ones you listed are fine).

    Corporate operations, I suggest keeping traditional titles. When you meet with a CEO of a company, and your title is unrelated to his hierarchy, he may not know or understand what your role is with that company. I believe corporate operations should be kept very separate from field operations, and each require different qualifications and experience to do. Adding one rank structure to include both may suggest that a security guard could realistically "work his way" up the ladder to eventually become Commander or whatever you choose your highest rank to be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    How about CEO....in a business suit?

    Or General Manager....in a business suit?

    I guess it depends on your market, but I like the idea of a professional looking, business minded leader dealing with clients. Unless a Chief of Police or doing alot of field work, would clients appreciate dealing with a "nicer" uniform more?
    Last edited by Eric; 05-20-2011, 01:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by YANG View Post
    How about Commander?
    That's the rank used by the Montreal Police for the person in charge of the local police stations.

    Leave a comment:


  • YANG
    replied
    How about Commander?

    Leave a comment:


  • 5423
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    Here's my vote for the rank the chief should wear: http://www.achart.ca/publications/im...in_dada_lg.jpg
    Doggone it, HS, my attornies already told you not to use my image without specific permission... but am glad I set the example for sartorial splendor!

    Tak, appropriate rank structure largely depends on the organization of your organization. But in general (no pun), I do like your thinking: (1) A crew will not long remain happy with their employment conditions without a clearly defined and smooth-running chain-of-command. (2) Pay, promotion(s), rank, responsibility, and authority all need to be closely tied together, along with quanitfiable performance metrics.
    Last edited by 5423; 05-20-2011, 10:36 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nadal
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    Here's my vote for the rank the chief should wear: http://www.achart.ca/publications/im...in_dada_lg.jpg
    That was great....I think he is one man army with all ranks and badges.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    My rank that I swear if i didn't need the job I would put on my business cards: "Assistant Director of What's Left of the Security Department"

    Leave a comment:


  • TakRail
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    Here's my vote for the rank the chief should wear: http://www.achart.ca/publications/im...in_dada_lg.jpg
    That's funny right there.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by TakRail View Post
    What is a good rank structure?

    Here is something I was thinking of...
    1. Chief Of Security (Branch Manager)... Rank - ?????
    2. Assistant Chief Of Security... Rank - Captain
    3. Shift Supervisor... Rank - Lieutenant
    4. Site Supervisor... Rank - Sergeant
    5. Site Shift Supervisor... Rank - Corporal
    6. Officer (Site Guard)... Rank - None

    Also, what type of rank should a Chief wear? Or just the collar pins that say Chief.
    Here's my vote for the rank the chief should wear: http://www.achart.ca/publications/im...in_dada_lg.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • TakRail
    started a topic Rank Structure

    Rank Structure

    What is a good rank structure?

    Here is something I was thinking of...
    1. Chief Of Security (Branch Manager)... Rank - ?????
    2. Assistant Chief Of Security... Rank - Captain
    3. Shift Supervisor... Rank - Lieutenant
    4. Site Supervisor... Rank - Sergeant
    5. Site Shift Supervisor... Rank - Corporal
    6. Officer (Site Guard)... Rank - None

    Also, what type of rank should a Chief wear? Or just the collar pins that say Chief.

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X