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  • #16
    I've read some great responses and it's helped me a little, but one thing I still wonder is this:

    If you are a young manager for a company (early twenty's) and the company gives you a site and the responsibility to hire a team how should you go about staffing it? Is age a factor? I'm worried that some older people would have trouble listening to someone a lot younger than them, and people younger than me would take issue listening to me due to me only being 23. I know that hiring a team is one of the most important things to do for my future site, and I have a general idea now on what to look for but can anyone give me some more advice on what I should be looking for?
    Perfection is a bunch of small things done right.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Zanev View Post
      I've read some great responses and it's helped me a little, but one thing I still wonder is this:

      If you are a young manager for a company (early twenty's) and the company gives you a site and the responsibility to hire a team how should you go about staffing it? Is age a factor? I'm worried that some older people would have trouble listening to someone a lot younger than them, and people younger than me would take issue listening to me due to me only being 23. I know that hiring a team is one of the most important things to do for my future site, and I have a general idea now on what to look for but can anyone give me some more advice on what I should be looking for?
      First, I wouldn't shy away from hiring people who are "older" (which, in your twenties, might mean people in their thirties or forties, right?). However, if you're really concerned about this I'd suggest you read Managing the Generational Mix. (You'll quickly spot the relevant chapters.)

      (Something of interest to note: The judgment centers of the brain are typically not fully developed until an individual is in their late twenties...especially in males.)

      People of any age want much the same thing from a supervisor, including (in no particular order of importance):

      1. A genuine interest in them as people.
      2. Predictability and stability - of mood, as well as expectations.
      3. Courtesy and respect.
      4. Clarity of expectations.
      5. Fair play and consistency.
      6. Sincere expressions of appreciation, especially for extra effort or superior performance.
      7. An opportunity to express their opinions and ideas.
      8. The sense that you will represent their interests to management, as well as the other way around.
      9. Confidentiality in all personal matters involving employees that you may become privy to.
      10. Personal competence in the job - i.e., that you "know your stuff".
      11. An example of personal adherence to company policies - i.e., not allowing yourself to cut corners or violate company rules that you're responsible for enforcing.
      12. Refusal to get drawn into cliques or to listen to gossip, and no "playing favorites".
      13. Honoring your promises.

      As for how you should staff, I would rank demonstrated stability as being the most important characteristic to look for - even more important than prior security or military experience. You would probably define "stability" somewhat differently for younger applicants than for older ones, but it's still the most important trait. With youthful applicants seeking their first job, you can get a picture of stability from things like:

      1. Playing varsity sports.
      2. Playing a musical instrument for a number of years.
      3. Participation in extracurricular activities (drama, yearbook, etc.)
      4. Finishing high school, or obtaining an AA or BA degree, with a respectable grade point average.
      5. Academic honors and awards.
      6. Involvement in social, church or charitable activities.
      7. Checking personal references including teachers, coaches, minister, youth leader, etc. Personal references are very important when it comes to checking out young applicants who have no employment history to check. Try to get at least five personal references to check. Any kid who can give you five substantial adult references is probably pretty stable (assuming they confirm this when you call them). When you talk to these references, one question you always want to ask is: "I am considering hiring Bob for a position that involves considerable responsibility and requires good judgment. Would you have any hesitation whatsoever to recommend him for such a position?"
      Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-07-2011, 02:40 AM.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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      • #18
        Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
        First, I wouldn't shy away from hiring people who are "older" (which, in your twenties, might mean people in their thirties or forties, right?). However, if you're really concerned about this I'd suggest you read Managing the Generational Mix. (You'll quickly spot the relevant chapters.)

        (Something of interest to note: The judgment centers of the brain are typically not fully developed until an individual is in their late twenties...especially in males.)

        People of any age want much the same thing from a supervisor, including (in no particular order of importance):

        1. A genuine interest in them as people.
        2. Predictability and stability - of mood, as well as expectations.
        3. Courtesy and respect.
        4. Clarity of expectations.
        5. Fair play and consistency.
        6. Sincere expressions of appreciation, especially for extra effort or superior performance.
        7. An opportunity to express their opinions and ideas.
        8. The sense that you will represent their interests to management, as well as the other way around.
        9. Confidentiality in all personal matters involving employees that you may become privy to.
        10. Personal competence in the job - i.e., that you "know your stuff".
        11. An example of personal adherence to company policies - i.e., not allowing yourself to cut corners or violate company rules that you're responsible for enforcing.
        12. Refusal to get drawn into cliques or to listen to gossip, and no "playing favorites".
        13. Honoring your promises.

        As for how you should staff, I would rank demonstrated stability as being the most important characteristic to look for - even more important than prior security or military experience. You would probably define "stability" somewhat differently for younger applicants than for older ones, but it's still the most important trait. With youthful applicants seeking their first job, you can get a picture of stability from things like:

        1. Playing varsity sports.
        2. Playing a musical instrument for a number of years.
        3. Participation in extracurricular activities (drama, yearbook, etc.)
        4. Finishing high school, or obtaining an AA or BA degree, with a respectable grade point average.
        5. Academic honors and awards.
        6. Involvement in social, church or charitable activities.
        7. Checking personal references including teachers, coaches, minister, youth leader, etc. Personal references are very important when it comes to checking out young applicants who have no employment history to check. Try to get at least five personal references to check. Any kid who can give you five substantial adult references is probably pretty stable (assuming they confirm this when you call them). When you talk to these references, one question you always want to ask is: "I am considering hiring Bob for a position that involves considerable responsibility and requires good judgment. Would you have any hesitation whatsoever to recommend him for such a position?"


        This is some great insight on this topic. I am a "younger" security company owner, and I hire people of all ages. I find that when you hire good quality "high caliber" employees of any age, they tend to respect people who are in a position of authority regardless of how old they are. If you hire "Joe Blow" who is fine working for minimum wage, and doesn't have much pride in himself or herself, or the company they work for, then you may have a problem with the age barrier!






        National Protective Agency
        Auburn Maine
        1-800-292-4965
        www.nationalprotective.net

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