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  • new 2 inch gun

    FYI - Please check out the following CBS website video on the 2 inch Swissgun.

    http://wcbstv.com/video/[email protected]

    Mini Guns Put ATF On Alert

    Ti-Hua Chang, Reporting (CBS) NEW YORK, Sep 6, 2006 11:13 am US/Eastern

    Federal ATF Agents issued an officer safety advisory on what is called the world’s smallest gun after a CBS 2 inquiry. The Alert has been issued both in the New York and nationally to all Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives criminal investigators and will be passed on to other federal agencies.

    ATF has confiscated thousands of disguised or miniature guns -- from flashlights that shoot a .25 caliber bullet to pen guns.

    The latest miniature gun that is alarming ATF agents is the SwissMiniGun. It’s extremely small -- just over two inches long. It comes with tiny bullets designed especially for the weapon that can penetrate skin. Even in its holster, this gun is so small that law enforcement experts say it could pass for a keychain ornament.

    According to William McMahon, special agent in charge of the New York ATF office, that makes it the perfect stealth weapon for a variety of criminals.

    “A terrorist, a criminal trying to sneak into bank, all kinds of criminals. I can see no legitimate reason to own this gun. It seems to be just made to be hidden,” McMahon said.

    As its name indicates, the SwissMiniGun is manufactured in Switzerland. CBS 2 News reached the company's CEO, Paul Erard, by phone.

    He said the gun is a miniature, detailed copy of the Colt Python revolver. He sells it for roughly $5,000 to gun collectors (though he added that most of his guns are encrusted with diamonds and gold, so they can cost $30,000).

    He said he has sold 50 miniguns, all to only one area of the world. “Contacts in the Middle East asked me to make a miniature of Colt Python," said Erard.

    Erard refused to say which Middle-Eastern countries. His reaction when asked if terrorists might use it? At first he laughed and said, “ Absolutely ridiculous.”

    When CBS 2 got him to admit his gun shoots bullets using gunpowder, he then changed his tone. “Of course I am concerned as manufacturers of air guns are concerned. This is not a toy,” said Erard.

    A national police organization notes that unlike air guns, SwissMiniGuns can be concealed and shoot with gunpowder bullets that travel at 400-plus feet per second. These bullets could be aimed at the face.

    Joe Occhipinti of the National Police Defense Foundation was alarmed by the SwissMiniGun’s potential uses, noting, “In a routine stop, a guy could certainly make a joke, and 'Say see my little gun here?' point at the officer and shoot. It looks like a key chain and [an officer’s] guard would be down."

    Occhipinti added, "I could easily see a passenger attempting to go to an airport take out a key chain put in with coins in the little basket. No one would detect that."

    SwissMiniGuns cannot be legally imported into the United States because the barrel is less than three inches long -- in this case, a lot less.

    No SwissMiniGuns have been recovered here yet, but McMahon admits, “If it came into the United States, it would be a concern.”

    This alert is the result of a single officer in Maryland seeing the gun on a Web site and alerting other officers, including the National Police Defense Foundation.

    CBS 2 News learned of the weapon and passed word on to the ATF. It is an example of officers using the Internet the way some terrorists do but in this case, to combat them.

    (© MMVI, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

  • #2
    I saw this on another site a few weeks ago. I forget where, unfortunately, but I don't forget the comments.

    "So, how are you going to clean it?"

    Everyone thought it was a joke.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      I saw that report too. Extremely unsettling.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #4
        all the more reason to do a complete and thorough search of your suspects, its a key chain they say, good for you we arent letting you bring it on the plane/train/bus/ etc

        nuff said
        stay safe
        Ben

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        • #5
          I don't see any of the rats I deal with paying $5-30,000 for a toy-looking revolver when they can buy a hot Jennings .22 or the like for $50-150 on the street.

          I'm more worried about the recent rash of plastic knives we've been seeing here...Most of the "Blackie Collins" variety.

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          • #6
            Ah, yes, the CIA letter opener.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wilrobnson
              I don't see any of the rats I deal with paying $5-30,000 for a toy-looking revolver when they can buy a hot Jennings .22 or the like for $50-150 on the street.
              Fair enough. But the story also showed two "Pen" style guns. They didn't tell us the price on those. And even if those are still out of the average guy's price range, it's only a matter of time before some kid in shop class figures out how to make a makeshift firing pin fire a bullet and shoot it down a steel pipe.

              Take the news story for what it's worth, a general warning to keep your eyes open, your vest on and your searches complete.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Szorcsik001
                Fair enough. But the story also showed two "Pen" style guns. They didn't tell us the price on those. And even if those are still out of the average guy's price range, it's only a matter of time before some kid in shop class figures out how to make a makeshift firing pin fire a bullet and shoot it down a steel pipe.

                Take the news story for what it's worth, a general warning to keep your eyes open, your vest on and your searches complete.
                Szorcsik001:
                I own one of each and used them when inspection court security at federal Courthouses.
                When travelling to and from I put them in the basket for clutter and went through the screening process. That was pre-9/11. I was never challenged. I made my reports to my person who asked me to test the procedures. He then made a written report and forwarded it to FAA.
                We also tested the procedures with a .22 NART hidden in a small camera. Again, pre-9/11 and never detected. If detected, I was to show them a letter from the Service. Never had to display that letter.
                Fellow security professionals, clutter is not always clutter. The only way to find stuff is to LOOK FOR IT! Seldom do we really do that.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill

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                • #9
                  Corrections officers could probably teach us much about search techniques for weapons and other contraband. The inmates have probably tried every trick in the book at one time or another. It would be interesting to accompany them during a lockdown cell search.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #10
                    I once visited the Kenosha County courthouse. The new metal detectors were staffed by deputies (they are now staffed by security, I should really pay them a visit)...

                    I had a deputy look at my Innova flashlight curiously, and I said, "Flashlight." They stopped poking at it, and gave it back - never could get the thing to turn on, they didn't even try.

                    Nobody knows to look for everything. But, as we all know, they make guns out of flashlights.
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      I once visited the Kenosha County courthouse. The new metal detectors were staffed by deputies (they are now staffed by security, I should really pay them a visit)...

                      I had a deputy look at my Innova flashlight curiously, and I said, "Flashlight." They stopped poking at it, and gave it back - never could get the thing to turn on, they didn't even try.

                      Nobody knows to look for everything. But, as we all know, they make guns out of flashlights.
                      You probably didn't appear nervous or suspicious. After a while, your "gut" tells you when more investigation is needed. (Disclaimer: Before I get jumped on, I know that isn't the "gold standard" in making sure, but it happens all the time)
                      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                      Comment

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