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  1. #1
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    Apr 2009
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    Default I am trying to start a security business in colorado

    I am trying to strat a security guard and patrol company in colorado. I need to know the steps I need to do to do this. I need to know what armed insurance cost. Any info on starting a security guard and patrol company in colorado would be great.

    Thanks in advance for your time.

  2. #2

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    I'm gonna be straight up honest with you. If you need to ask these types of questions on a forum like this your setting yourself up for failure. Get some experience, in a management capacity of a successful security company and you will find out all answers to your questions. Security isn't like most businesses, if you don't know about security management and marketing honestly you will probably fail.

    Hopefully you don't take this the wrong way.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by glock-man21 View Post
    I am trying to strat a security guard and patrol company in colorado. I need to know the steps I need to do to do this. I need to know what armed insurance cost. Any info on starting a security guard and patrol company in colorado would be great.

    Thanks in advance for your time.
    The state doesn't license security companies or guards but some local governments do (really, this isn't licensing, but more like "registering" your company with the local gov't - for a fee, natch). Check with each of the city/county clerk's offices in the area where you plan to offer services. One thing they're likely to ask for is either proof of liability insurance or a surety bond, but whether they ask for insurance or not you MUST have it unless you're a total fool. That's where you'll have a problem if you have no experience in the field because it's unlikely that anyone will insure you.

    I concur with the previous poster: If you have no experience in the field, I'd get some before thinking about starting a company, no matter how easy Colorado makes it for you to do so - which only means they're making it easier for you to lose a whole chunk of change. Modern security, and especially operating a successful security service, is about much more than just throwing some uniforms on people and handing them the keys to a patrol vehicle. MUCH more. If that's the misconception you're laboring under, lose it for your own good.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-10-2010 at 09:02 AM.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by SecTrainer View Post
    The state doesn't license security companies or guards but some local governments do (really, this isn't licensing, but more like "registering" your company with the local gov't - for a fee, natch). Check with each of the city/county clerk's offices in the area where you plan to offer services. One thing they're likely to ask for is either proof of liability insurance or a surety bond, but whether they ask for insurance or not you MUST have it unless you're a total fool. That's where you'll have a problem if you have no experience in the field because it's unlikely that anyone will insure you.

    I concur with the previous poster: If you have no experience in the field, I'd get some before thinking about starting a company, no matter how easy Colorado makes it for you to do so - which only means they're making it easier for you to lose a whole chunk of change. Modern security, and especially operating a successful security service, is about much more than just throwing some uniforms on people and handing them the keys to a patrol vehicle. MUCH more. If that's the misconception you're laboring under, lose it for your own good.
    If I may add, the State of Colorado doesn't regulate the private investigation industry as well. To my knowledge, it wasn't always this way and state associations are lobbying to try and bring back state regulation into the industry. After many years of state regulation, it was determined that the industry did not warrant regulation (due to little if any incidents) and the costs to the state for running a regulatory agency wasn't justified.

    From what I have read, there is a belief that those whom wish to bring about state regulation are the long established dinosaurs of the industry who are merely trying to protect their business from a johnny-come-lately (like you) who will end up cutting into a slice of their pie.
    Last edited by FireControlman; 01-10-2010 at 02:40 PM.
    Navy Chief, Navy Pride

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireControlman View Post
    If I may add, the State of Colorado doesn't regulate the private investigation industry as well. To my knowledge, it wasn't always this way and state associations are lobbying to try and bring back state regulation into the industry. After many years of state regulation, it was determined that the industry did not warrant regulation (due to little if any incidents) and the costs to the state for running a regulatory agency wasn't justified.

    From what I have read, there is a belief that those whom wish to bring about state regulation are the long established dinosaurs of the industry who are merely trying to protect their business from a johnny-come-lately (like you) who will end up cutting into a slice of their pie..
    Raising barriers to entry is certainly an old and time-tested ploy by established companies to obstruct new competitors. In the security industry, however, the so-called "barriers" usually turn out to be nothing more than "speed bumps" that can easily be cleared by almost anyone without even slowing down. It's not very a very effective anti-competitive strategy in our field.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NoCo
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    873

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    Being that I work and live in Colorado, what the others have posted is correct. There is no state license and most areas (except for Greeley, Denver, Denver County, Weld County (armed only) and Colorado Springs) require licenses for the officers and company. Some other places may require companies to register as security companies, alot of places require you to register so you can charge your client's tax. Starting a Security company for the most part in Colorado is no different then starting any other company.


    As for the licensing goes, I have seen how some of these yahoo local companies are ran, and I have seen some of the people my company has hired (I work for a large international company) and I have to say licensing would be welcome. A nice mix between what Cheyenne, Wyoming (the only good thing about that city) with a lifelong license (so long as you don't switch companies and your company keeps it's license active) with no renewal fees and Greeley who requires 24 hours of inital training and 24 hours of refresher training every year. Greeley charges way too much for thier licenses though, if you ask me. For an idea of what I am talking about look up Union Colony Security in the local newspapers. An owner of theirs is a convicted felon, charged with sexual assualt. The county deputies arrested him on a site client's site armed with a gun in uniform working the post. Nice huh?

    Anyways to the OP if you have questions PM me as I have been looking into the doing the same thing, however honestly the local companies are too cutthroat for me to be willing to get started anytime soon. Especially when one charges $10 a month for a mobile hit as specific site.
    Be on your guard; stand firm in the faith; be courageous; be strong. - 1 Corinthians 16:13

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    My military contract is up and over. However, I never needed to affirm that I would defend the constitution, our freedoms, our way of life from enemies both domestic and foreign. Do not think that since I am no longer in the military, I will not pick up a weapon to defend my family, my home or my country. - Me!

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