+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NH, USA
    Posts
    676

    Default

    Welcome aboard, shifty, and well said.

    Fitting room cases need to be handled very carefully, and with much professionalism towards any other customers that may be around. I have read more bad stops that occurred in fitting rooms than anywhere else in the store; but the majority of the largest stops I've seen (all but 2, in fact, of all the apprehensions over $1500 that I've either been involved in or oversaw) were also fitting room concealments. If you follow your steps--and your company policies--there's no reason why fitting rooms need to be a sink hole for merchandise.

    Oh, and on a side note, I too have never had a fitting room apprehension not stand up (US, Mass & NH primarily), and that's with several hundred to the credit.
    "I don't do judgment. Just retrieval."

    "The true triumph of reason is that it enables us to get along with those who do not possess it."

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shifty View Post
    That's why most LP programs have "steps" that have to be observed to make an arrest, the first 2 being "Approach" and "Selection". That's how you know it was something that didn't already belong to them.



    Because you observe the subject enter the fitting room with, let's say 4 items, which you observed them previously select and then you observe the subject exit with only 2 items in their hands and put them back on the floor. You inspect the fitting room area (while your partner maintains observation of the subject) and find no merchandise in there. That means the subject has 2 items concealed.



    You don't. But you still maintained continuity, so you know the subject has 2 items on him. If they exit and not make an attempt to pay, you can arrest them.



    This is why fitting rooms are not a safe zone for thieves.
    Many of my arrests were fitting room cases and have stood up in court (in Canada).
    I agree also...points well made. The reasons that I brought these issues up were because, (1) Not all companies have the same policies regarding dressing room stops, which is unfortunate I think (2) With the company that I worked for previously, once a suspect went into a fitting room, the app was blown regardless of whether or not if all the steps were made up to that point

    Also, with our RLPM, DLPM & sometimes even the LPM it didn't matter that all the steps were still in affect when it came to fitting rooms. I know for a fact that there were a few times when the LPM gave the okay for an app on something like that, and even though everything turned out great guess who would get the reem job when the s**t hit the fan for even making a stop....Not the LPM but us, the LPA's

    This had always been probably the biggest topic that we didn't agree on. It's unfortunate to because we lost several apps when suspects went inside the fitting rooms
    "Life In Every Breath"

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LPAjh9558 View Post
    I agree also...points well made. The reasons that I brought these issues up were because, (1) Not all companies have the same policies regarding dressing room stops, which is unfortunate I think (2) With the company that I worked for previously, once a suspect went into a fitting room, the app was blown regardless of whether or not if all the steps were made up to that point

    Also, with our RLPM, DLPM & sometimes even the LPM it didn't matter that all the steps were still in affect when it came to fitting rooms. I know for a fact that there were a few times when the LPM gave the okay for an app on something like that, and even though everything turned out great guess who would get the reem job when the s**t hit the fan for even making a stop....Not the LPM but us, the LPA's

    This had always been probably the biggest topic that we didn't agree on. It's unfortunate to because we lost several apps when suspects went inside the fitting rooms
    Hmm... I disagree with that sort of practice, as most theft in clothing stores happens in the fitting rooms, so you're basically turning a blind eye to the biggest area of your external losses.

    I suppose this could be because fitting room cases can be tricky and the risk of making a bad stop is higher (because it requires 2 investigators and more steps), the company would rather avoid the liability and take the hit.

    I hope this company would take more agressive prevention efforts in the fitting rooms, such as employing fitting room attendants and using locked and isolated fitting rooms.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shifty View Post
    Hmm... I disagree with that sort of practice, as most theft in clothing stores happens in the fitting rooms, so you're basically turning a blind eye to the biggest area of your external losses.

    I suppose this could be because fitting room cases can be tricky and the risk of making a bad stop is higher (because it requires 2 investigators and more steps), the company would rather avoid the liability and take the hit.

    I hope this company would take more agressive prevention efforts in the fitting rooms, such as employing fitting room attendants and using locked and isolated fitting rooms.
    I'm with you on this problem. I believe that for the most part, a majority of the shoplifters may have known about the policy with the fitting rooms. And whether it was because of a current/former employee or just through repetitive theft of using the fitting rooms to see what they could get away with, really doesn't matter. Until something is changed the losses will continue to grow for them.

    A blind eye is an understatement here I think.....
    The issue of locked fitting rooms with attendants has always been discussed. However, the companies main arguement is that the cost of losing customers far more outways what they'll lose during the year in fitting room thefts...go figure!
    "Life In Every Breath"

  5. #15

    Default

    I was told during training that fitting room stops are against company policy, as well as bathroom stops. I found out later through talking to several other LPM's and LPA's that everyone does bathroom/fitting room stops, but you just need to be pretty damn sure. Find a tag or a package, and if you saw them select it, and it's gone you're usually going to be OK. I suspect my boss wanted to tell me that but was trying to teach me "by the book" or whatever and didn't. Kind of bums me out, I would have had a couple more apprehensions had I known.
    Top Flight

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LPAjh9558 View Post
    We did have the idea being tossed around as to whether or not if "locking" the dressing rooms would be something of concern. The main arguement against this was that by doing it, and only allowing that department to have the key/code, would cost the store more business than was worth the effort. Losing merchandise to dressing room theft was right up there as one of the top categories for shrinkage. We would find literally tons of tags and/or clothes that were switched for new ones...grrrr!
    The only time I seem to loose product out of the fitting rooms is if the clothing staff have their head up their rear. This usually consists of clothing associate who leaves the door unlocked, doesn't clear the fitting rooms regularly, or LETS a customer in with a backpack or babystroller.

    It's a never ending battle keeping this department to follow procedure and I have to constantly reinforce the training they receive.

    Just a thought... I really don't think that LEGITIMATE customers ever have issues with waiting a reasonable amount time for a staff member to let them in. In my store we try to make it a little more enjoyable than normal because we use an old cowbell to signal for customer assistance @ the fitting rooms. It also forces the clothing associates to be attentive to the sales floor which helps in two ways, first... they are less likely to be in the backstock stealing from their employer and second... it gives them a time for customer service that DOESN'T seem overly aggressive to the customer.

    Justice_Hound
    LP Manager
    Last edited by Justice_Hound; 03-07-2008 at 01:27 AM.
    We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.
    -George Orwell

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    716

    Default

    I must be the customer you hate. I hate to shop. I go in, get what I want and leave. If I have to wait more than thirty seconds for a changing room I'm outta there.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,876

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig333 View Post
    I must be the customer you hate. I hate to shop. I go in, get what I want and leave. If I have to wait more than thirty seconds for a changing room I'm outta there.
    I agree. The merchants objective is to sell merchandise at a profit - not to placate LP. I see alot of "fitting room" cases in the civil legal system. I do not wait for a fitting room to open, and I'm a "LEGITIMATE" customer.






  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by liteyouup View Post
    I was told during training that fitting room stops are against company policy, as well as bathroom stops. I found out later through talking to several other LPM's and LPA's that everyone does bathroom/fitting room stops, but you just need to be pretty damn sure. Find a tag or a package, and if you saw them select it, and it's gone you're usually going to be OK. I suspect my boss wanted to tell me that but was trying to teach me "by the book" or whatever and didn't. Kind of bums me out, I would have had a couple more apprehensions had I known.
    Quote Originally Posted by Justice_Hound View Post
    The only time I seem to loose product out of the fitting rooms is if the clothing staff have their head up their rear. This usually consists of clothing associate who leaves the door unlocked, doesn't clear the fitting rooms regularly, or LETS a customer in with a backpack or babystroller.

    It's a never ending battle keeping this department to follow procedure and I have to constantly reinforce the training they receive.

    Just a thought... I really don't think that LEGITIMATE customers ever have issues with waiting a reasonable amount time for a staff member to let them in. In my store we try to make it a little more enjoyable than normal because we use an old cowbell to signal for customer assistance @ the fitting rooms. It also forces the clothing associates to be attentive to the sales floor which helps in two ways, first... they are less likely to be in the backstock stealing from their employer and second... it gives them a time for customer service that DOESN'T seem overly aggressive to the customer.

    Justice_Hound
    LP Manager
    That's how it is with where I worked. We were told from the start that fitting and/or restrooms were a definate NO-APP situation. Although I suppose that if the amount being taken were large enough ($1,000 ) then they might have a different attitude about it Like I've mentioned, the way we were told is that once you lose sight of the merchandise (even if tags are recovered and all the steps are met) it doesn't matter because you can never be sure enough of where it was concealed.....

    It's true. Just think of all the apps that were lost due to this issue I know that we lost several during my time there so...
    IMHO, yes I would've wanted to make those stops, but when it comes to being 100% sure that you know everything that's happened....then I'd rather be safe ya know

    I agree that the LEGITIMATE customer(s) probably wouldn't mind either way as long as they know that we're doing our jobs. By that I mean the clothing associates taking care of them as well as LP's contributing also. Management had a rule where all fitting rooms were to be checked at least once every hour, maybe more if busy. But it usually didn't happen...
    "Life In Every Breath"

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LPAjh9558 View Post
    Why does the idea of dressing rooms being a safe zone for shoplifters seem like a "myth" to you?
    I won't discuss my former's employer's policies or LP strategies but I think other members have already covered it. Most LP departments in the area that I know of conduct fitting room stops because that's where 80% of the shoplifting occurs. I never had a bad stop out of a fitting room nor did I ever get a case dropped or even get called to testify in court.

    How do you know if what the person had when they went in, wasn't something that already belonged to them?
    If you're asking this, I'm assuming you're a fairly inexperienced officer--otherwise, that should be self evident.

    How do you if the merchandise was and/or has been concealed?
    This has been answered. It's a simple matter of deduction. I know what was taken in and what was taken out.

    How do you know where the merchandise was concealed?
    I don't, nor did I particularly care. This information was not needed per company policy nor was it needed to establish probable cause for the police to make an arrest, much less proof for a conviction. It's nice to know information that should be included in a report if you have it, but obviously in a fitting room stop you won't unless you can see the merchandise concealed somewhere obvious. I understand some employers make this a mandatory "step" that must be known before apprehension, however. I personally think that's silly. Perhaps it's per your state laws or prosecutor's request, and if so, then by all means do it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts