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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    8

    Question Need advice for upgrading CCTV system

    Hi everyone,

    I'm pretty new at CCTV systems but have been put in charge of upgrading our current system to a new system. We have 25 retail stores and one home office that needs upgrading.

    We currently have a multiplexer with 8 cameras, a video output, and a time-lapse VCR for recording in each store. The tapes are getting very hard to find and the powers that be want to upgrade to a DVR system.

    I've done a lot of research and it looks like we can get a fairly decent 8 channel DVR with a DVD+RW or a CD+RW for about $1,200-$1,400 (we will be using the cameras we already have).

    There are several DVRs that stand out to me but I would like someone with more experience to give me their opinion.

    The three that stand out to me are:

    Nuvico NVDV3-8250
    Art Real Time ATD785D
    VC-SYS-8CHWEBR


    Any opinions would be helpful or links to where I could go to learn more.

    TIA
    BJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington area.
    Posts
    208

    Default

    I have never heard of any of the three DVRs that you mention. I assume that these are available from online sellers of CCTV products. While you can get some great buys shopping on the internet, many of these sellers import products from off-shore manufacturers and private label them. There can sometimes be a lack of long-term service and technical support from this type of seller. This risk is usually acceptable for something like a mom and pop convenience store, but probably not something that would be acceptable for a larger organization that had multiple locations.

    You may want to look at some more "mainstream" DVRs available from some of the leading security CCTV manufacturers. These would include American Dynamics/Intellex, Bosch, Integral Technologies, and Pelco, just to name a few. These manufacturers make products that are widely used in commercial CCTV applications and these products are generally well supported for a long period of time after they are sold.

    http://www.americandynamics.net/products/products.aspx
    http://www.boschsecurity.us/index.html
    http://www.integraltech.com/
    http://www.pelco.com/

    It is difficult to compare DVRs "apples-to-apples" because there are so many variables between manufacturers. In addition to the number of cameras that the unit handles, some of the other things you want to look at include total frame rate (frames per second), available resolution settings, on-board hard drive capacity, and ability to be viewed/controlled over the network.

    Good luck with your project and feel free to ask any specific questions that you may have.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tucson Arizona
    Posts
    958

    Default

    I have not heard of the systems you stated either. I agree with Silva Consultants. If you have sites away from the home office networking is a good option. If you have something happen at a site they can view and download the video information at the home office. The products Silva listed are good and do have excellent support.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thank you both very much for the quick replies and advice. I will definately check out the websites you provided.
    BJ

  5. #5

    Default

    The Nuvico system is crap. I haven't heard of the other systems either but I can't imagine they are much better.

    What you buy depends on your budget. If you are on a tight budget, buy Samsung's SHR series DVRs (http://www.gviss.com/), which give you the most bang for your buck. They look very good, they have models that have DVD burners on board, and you can pop them open and add more memory if you know even a little bit about computer hardware.

    Unfortuantly, my company doesn't sell that particular line.

    If you have a real budget (or a real need), you may want to go with Panasonic IP cameras with NVRs and a WAN (I assume the sites you mentioned are widely seperated). Very high quality, like what you see on TV shows like CSI, even casino quality stuff. They are also extremely expensive.

    If you go with a traditional, analog camera system, do not be fooled by prices. The lower the price, the worse the picture will be (for the most part). Go with Everfocus box cameras with Pentax lenses for the fixed cameras, and Samsung PTZs.

    Do not cheap out with memory. Figure on a maximum of 6gb per camera, per 24 hours, at best quality.

    If you have any other questions, send me a private message and I can give you my work phone#.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BJ9 View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I'm pretty new at CCTV systems but have been put in charge of upgrading our current system to a new system. We have 25 retail stores and one home office that needs upgrading.

    We currently have a multiplexer with 8 cameras, a video output, and a time-lapse VCR for recording in each store. The tapes are getting very hard to find and the powers that be want to upgrade to a DVR system.

    I've done a lot of research and it looks like we can get a fairly decent 8 channel DVR with a DVD+RW or a CD+RW for about $1,200-$1,400 (we will be using the cameras we already have).

    There are several DVRs that stand out to me but I would like someone with more experience to give me their opinion.

    The three that stand out to me are:

    Nuvico NVDV3-8250
    Art Real Time ATD785D
    VC-SYS-8CHWEBR


    Any opinions would be helpful or links to where I could go to learn more.

    TIA
    TIA, I know 2 out of 3 of your choice DVRs.. Frankly speaking, none of these options will give you the piece of mind when you roll so many of them throughout your chain... The right solution that you are searching of course is cost effectiveness of the DVR, solid 3 years warranty, ease of use and ease of implementation... so that you can manage the entire chain without being a technical guru...

    Your price range actually provides some limited, yet available choices... thus it falls into what is called Embedded DVR solutions world... My recommendations will be to select Embedded system (this is a type of system that has all its functionality built into a flash memory, thus the hard drive space is used only for storing video clips)... They do not come with all the bells and whistles, but are excellent performers... easy to setup, easy to program and easy to operate...

    Here are some option that are available:

    1. CBC DR8NC-250 - This model is an Embedded system and comes with 250GB storage, CD burner and remote control (or manual control) device... Internet ready and with 3 years warranty... The pricing should be around $1,000... (The same model with 500GB storage space could run around $1,200.00)

    2. American Dynamics EDVR series - ADEDVR009008 - This model is their 9 channel solution, Embedded, starts with 80GB storage, CD burner, Internet ready and with 3 years warranty... The pricing should be around $1,100 and higher based on increase of the storage.

    Both of the above DVRs are manufactured from very reputable companies.. and both come with basic and simple solution that works. I am sure you can find these products in the market very easily...

    If you need any additional information, please let me know by PM..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thank you MetzLyov and Cameraman. I appreciate your advice and will check into your recommendations.

    Thanks
    BJ
    BJ

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Bentonville, AR
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    An important thing to know. Specs can be deceiving. For instance, it may look like this:
    640x480 (pixels)
    240 FPS (frames per second)

    But what they may really mean is
    240 FPS at 320x240 - hi frame rate, low quality
    120 FPS at 640x240
    60 FPS at 640x480 - low frame rate, high quality.

    These are just examples, but usually they tell you the max of each, but you won't get both. You have to dig a little deeper to find the details. They may use cif, 4cif & D1 instead of pixel count, but it still works out the same.

    Rocket Science
    Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


    http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
    One Man's Opinion

    The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Haymarket, VA
    Posts
    2,467

    Default

    BJ, if at all possible, ensure you get a "turn-key" system. The contractor you choose does all the work and furnishes all the equipment. He does all the site survey work. If new luminary installation is required, he works with your facilities folks and contracting officer and he installs or supervises its installation. Have that person responsible operator training and maintenance for stipulated period of time. If he screws up any of it, he eats it, not you. The system must meet your current as well as projected needs. If he runs into power, noise, interference, ground loop or other operational difficulties that weren't foreseen, not your problem. It is his as he didn't conduct a thorough enough or an indepth enough site survey.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Bentonville, AR
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Warnock View Post
    BJ, if at all possible, ensure you get a "turn-key" system. The contractor you choose does all the work and furnishes all the equipment. He does all the site survey work. If new luminary installation is required, he works with your facilities folks and contracting officer and he installs or supervises its installation. Have that person responsible operator training and maintenance for stipulated period of time. If he screws up any of it, he eats it, not you. The system must meet your current as well as projected needs. If he runs into power, noise, interference, ground loop or other operational difficulties that weren't foreseen, not your problem. It is his as he didn't conduct a thorough enough or an indepth enough site survey.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    Bill, how do you expect my competitors who low ball it to stay in business with those requirements? If you don't allow change orders to meet codes or make a working system, they'll not be able to complete it without losing money.

    Rocket Science
    Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


    http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
    One Man's Opinion

    The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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