1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Echos13 View Post
    Florida already requires mandatory 40 hours training provided by a licensed company for the exception of in-house. To expand or augment that would no doubt make the special interests groups and security companies bulk at the idea. Not to mention that it would make some people go for some other kind of work due to costs and time evolved to get eccentric training for something that my not truly need it.

    I think it should be done in classes of license (levels of training or certification) instead of just trying to make one person be Jack of all trades. It's just not logical to try and pile everything onto one class because some jobs do not require it.

    Make a class of unarmed licenses, the same for armed. Sounds eccentric? I think it would work better for those that work simple traditional O&R jobs. If you do something a little more proactive or dynamic then go to a class you can take to level up, etc. It would be more affordable to the person working and I personally think more compatible to the companies that only need certain classes for certain jobs.
    I don't think anyone's advocating a "one-size-fits-all" approach. In most states that regulate training, there are already different requirements for armed versus unarmed security officers.
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  2. #22
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    I don't believe most are ether' I agree. It just seems the industry its self however (companies) try to stay in that theme. Florida however seems to pretty much fall along those lines, other states do vary yes.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Echos13 View Post
    I don't believe most are ether' I agree. It just seems the industry its self however (companies) try to stay in that theme. Florida however seems to pretty much fall along those lines, other states do vary yes.
    There are some venues where I think a substantial amount of training more than "state minimums" should be required. Healthcare, of course, but also things like port security, transportation, chemical plants, nuclear/power plants, research facilities, sports arenas and others I could mention.

    Just like pilots have to hold an "endorsement" to fly particular types of aircraft, representing that they've been trained IN THAT AIRPLANE and passed check flights, I can envision a situation where security officers would have to hold a training "endorsement" to work in certain very high-risk venues. Such an endorsement would attest that the officer has been trained in the specific vulnerabilities and risks that the venue faces, how to identify those risks, how they should be addressed if and when they arise, and any other special operational procedures and protocols that the venue would require officers to be familiar with. Sending some guy who's been standing around in a grocery store watching fat women stuff turkeys in their crotches over to a power plant or a medical research facility just because someone's out sick just doesn't make any damn sense.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 08-17-2014 at 02:26 PM.
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SecTrainer View Post
    . Sending some guy who's been standing around in a grocery store watching fat women stuff turkeys in their crotches over to a power plant or a medical research facility just because someone's out sick just doesn't make any damn sense.
    But this is in fact what has been happening in a lot of states where companies have gotten used to being able to move personal based on availability not training or competency. Knowing that companies are going to do this sort of crap and will not change their habits the only solution is to increase the potential of the basic guard more in line with their higher trained brethren. Security companies are not going to willingly do the right thing unless their is a profit in it for them. Every indication out there is that the security industry want a race to the bottom, and fund their day to day operations out of the pockets of the guards they employee. Lower wages, higher profit margins, with the lowest qualified personal available, who wont complain is the business model. As much as I hate government interference I do think that this is the only way to force companies to be honest with the capabilities of who is sent to sites that warrant a higher trained officer.
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by SecTrainer View Post
    There are some venues where I think a substantial amount of training more than "state minimums" should be required. Healthcare, of course, but also things like port security, transportation, chemical plants, nuclear/power plants, research facilities, sports arenas and others I could mention.

    Just like pilots have to hold an "endorsement" to fly particular types of aircraft, representing that they've been trained IN THAT AIRPLANE and passed check flights, I can envision a situation where security officers would have to hold a training "endorsement" to work in certain very high-risk venues. Such an endorsement would attest that the officer has been trained in the specific vulnerabilities and risks that the venue faces, how to identify those risks, how they should be addressed if and when they arise, and any other special operational procedures and protocols that the venue would require officers to be familiar with. Sending some guy who's been standing around in a grocery store watching fat women stuff turkeys in their crotches over to a power plant or a medical research facility just because someone's out sick just doesn't make any damn sense.
    I both agree and disagree with this. I agree in that security officers assigned to higher risk sites should have more training. However, the problem then comes down to what they are allowed to do.

    For example, you could require an officer to have a POST certificate, SWAT School, Firefighter II, HAZMAT specialist and RSI qualified paramedic. If however the post orders still say "Strict O&R Only" then what? You will have a bunch of highly trained officers, who aren't allowed to use their training (and who will probably move on seeking greener pastures in about a week)

    If you want more training that's fine, but and especially if the officers have to pay out of pocket for it, that increased training needs to come with higher pay, better benefits and more responsiblities

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