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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Default What Are The Minimum Requirement To Get Hired By Your Employer?

    http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...or-Emergencies

    The above referenced thread made me wonder, what are the minimum requirement to get hired by your employer? And, perhaps more importantly, does your employer hire people that just meet the minimum or do they typically hire folks that have qualification well beyond the minimum? Also, what sort of turn over do you have? Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    MA
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    1,575

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    Minimum requirements is 18 years of age and no felony convictions. Thats for uniform positions, detective positions they want past LP experience as well as the above. All of us (detectives) have experience, theres more than a few entry level in the uniform positions. As for turnover, out of almost 20 employees im #5 with seniority at 9 months.
    Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    maryland
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    367

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1348 View Post
    http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...or-Emergencies

    The above referenced thread made me wonder, what are the minimum requirement to get hired by your employer? And, perhaps more importantly, does your employer hire people that just meet the minimum or do they typically hire folks that have qualification well beyond the minimum? Also, what sort of turn over do you have? Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?
    Went in, got hired and went to work that same night. Management were all there 5+ years but for everybody else I worked with they were there a year or less . The minimal requirements were that you needed to be 18 or older and have a diploma or GED . The company I was applying for asked can you stand for 6 or more hours and lift more then 50 lbs continuously . I replied are we moving the companies we are securing and everybody laughed then I was hired. I was given a uniform. The shirt was 3 sizes too big and the pants were 4 inches too short .
    Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
    Spiro Agnew

    Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

    Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    196

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1348 View Post
    Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?
    We have a high turn-over rate in this sector throughout the country, mostly because a lot of people just work before their conscript service or during their studies before moving along to their "actual" career. I remember seeing a statistic once that the average career of a security officer lasts two or so years around here.

    The legal requirements in a nutshell:Pass a 40h course to gain a temporary license permitting work for four months each year, then a 60h course for the actual five-year license. In accounts where you work as a "crowd controller" (mostly malls, hospitals and public transit), which is a distinct legal status, you'll also need the 32h course for a crowd controller license. You'll more or less pass all of the above if you have a clean criminal record, can read and write and have functional hands and feet. The written and practical exams are ridiculously easy.

    When I was recruited to my first company I was twenty with no prior security experience or licensing. It's still more or less the same in case of bigger companies, they're all so short on staff that more or less anyone can get in and the company will pay for their training, at least for entry-level tasks. I have experience in two security companies and know people in each company of the "Big Four" (Securitas, G4S, ISS and a certain locally owned firm) and this is almost universal in the capital region.

    Companies might have stricter criteria for more demanding accounts, such as mall security and transit. My current employer requires a year of experience in crowd controller accounts for our remaining malls, and another company I worked for had a requirement of two years experience for the mall account I worked at. The company handling the Helsinki commuter train system requires a minimum of two years in that account, to provide another example.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    209

    Default

    You just have to be breathing.

    As for most, security license, valid drivers license, drug free, and complete pre assignment training.

    At my site we have several with more than 20 years. Our turn over rate seems to be low and I attribute that to our security director/client who looks out for his people.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    367

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Security_K9_Guy View Post
    You just have to be breathing.

    As for most, security license, valid drivers license, drug free, and complete pre assignment training.

    At my site we have several with more than 20 years. Our turn over rate seems to be low and I attribute that to our security director/client who looks out for his people.
    Drug test what is that ? I have never been pissed for security except for when I had to use some of the higher levels of the force continuum. All they found was my ADD medication and still I was fired until I got an attorney pro-Bono from the ADA to get hired back. Should of gotten a pay day and run the hell away but it is what it is.
    Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
    Spiro Agnew

    Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

    Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    209

    Default

    They do a mouth swab and send it to a lab.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    515

    Default

    Yep. My company also.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    148

    Default

    As Polar wrote earlier on, the private security business around here favors the youngest recruits but in exchange the turnover rates are high because alot of people never consider this job as something to make a career out of.. I can't really blame them, since first of all your career advancement is going to be an uphill battle no matter how much you study the security field and pass the various examinations available for the private sector. Also one shouldn't go to work for the biggest companies, since there's going to be so much competition for the better paid positions and you really won't stand out from the crowds of people all competing for the better positions like locusts.

    The various companies also recruit all sorts of folks, it seems. You just have to have the necessary license to work as an officer and employment is pretty much guaranteed. Perhaps the more demanding accounts might be a different story.

    When I started about four years ago I had dropped out of the university and I had my year-long conscription in the defence forces done some years before. I paid for the necessary courses myself along with the additional use-of-force courses and after a hassle I started work for my current employer. The times were much better then, since the higher-ups actually had time to handle all the little tasks and shift planning wasn't total chaos like it is nowadays.

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