+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Minimum qualifications for warm body accounts is 18 ged/diploma, pulse, and no record. However they allow each director to set their own minimum for accepting candidates sent by corporate so sometimes it works out. At my site the majority of us have college degrees or are working towards them, lots of prior experience, at least 25 years old. Boss is doing his best to snag all the veterans who come through the pipeline. Our turnover is semi high I started a year ago and 6 people have left, however 4 of them finally got their academy classes one got enough college credits to join the Marines with a ged and the last moved out of state to care for an aging relative.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    NeOn
    Posts
    200

    Default

    Company: 18+, DL, Ministry-Approved Security Guard Training Course (can be obtained through company if need be), Guard Card, Standard First Aid (SG course states minimum Emergency First Aid) Clean Record.

    Client: Advanced/Industrial First Aid, NORCAT, TDG, AED, Fitness Test, Clean Piss Test.

    Some of us also have additional certs sought out independently.
    "Big City turn me loose and set me free."--Merle Haggard 'Big City'


    "If somebody gets in your face and calls you a ----sucker, I want you to be nice. Ask him to walk. Be nice. If he won't walk, walk him. But be nice. If you can't walk him, one of the others will help you, and you'll both be nice. I want you to remember that it's a job. It's nothing personal."<--Patrick Swayze, Roadhouse.


    Stop The World & Let Me Off.


    Safety First, All Else Second.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    801

    Default

    21 years of age, some experience preferred. Clean record. 40 hours of training; we meet the state's requirements for contract guards, the rest is training on how to do things our way. (We're in house.)

    Sadly, our retention rate has gone down, due to several factors. Night guards used to stay 2-3 years; day, swing and lead officers used to be 3-5 years. With the improving economy if we can get a night guard for 6 mos. to a year we're doing well.

    Some of the factors include not a lot of room to move up and a push to go to P/T officers. It is a high stress site, with a lot of verbal abuse from the tenants.

    Part timers are great from management's view because they cost less; in my view, you're getting an officer who isn't here enough of the time to get to know the place, and doesn't have 100% loyalty, because this isn't his (her) primary employer. Don't get me wrong, they do the best they can, but its not the same skill level as a guy whose done 40 hours a week for a couple of years.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Condo Guard View Post
    ...in my view, you're getting an officer who isn't here enough of the time to get to know the place, and doesn't have 100% loyalty, because this isn't his (her) primary employer. Don't get me wrong, they do the best they can, but its not the same skill level as a guy whose done 40 hours a week for a couple of years.
    It's too bad we've never figured out a way to put a firm dollar value on the "institutional knowledge" that walks out the door when experienced people leave. We do know that it's a substantial loss, but it's a "soft asset" that's been resistant to every effort that's been made to actually quantify it. Unfortunately, provable dollar-based numbers that you can plug into a spreadsheet are the only things that the corporate bean-counters and business executives - i.e., the ones who set wages - pay any attention to, so they think it's the same thing whether a 5-year or a 5-month employee leaves. We know differently, of course, but we just can't put it into dollars and cents that forces executives to see the value they should be paying for.

    It takes EXPERIENCE ("institutional knowledge") for an officer to know that something in the environment has changed, and to find out why. An officer who notices that Mr. Farquar has suddenly started staying after everyone leaves, when he's always been the first one out the door - and becomes curious about what Mr. Farquar's doing - just might be the most valuable asset you have at some particular moment in time. Maybe he's been given extra work - or maybe he's copying the company's customer lists to sell to a competitor. In any case, it merits some scrutiny, or perhaps just an extra notation in the duty log to the attention of the site manager for him to look into. He can find out if Mr. Farquar has a legitimate reason to be staying after hours, and bring it to the attention of his supervisor. It's a legitimate matter of concern - but not to anyone who doesn't spot that behavioral change in the first place.

    You simply can't get that level of surveillance from short-timers, no matter how diligent they might be, because they don't have the time in grade to be able to recognize the situation. When I was a rookie cop, it simply amazed me all the things that my FTO would see that meant nothing to me - a guy on this street corner, a car parked here or there. One time it was something that WASN'T where it should be - one of those sidewalk signs that the owner always put out when he opened up his shop. We drove around back where he parked and found him in his car, having a heart attack. How could I have possibly known that I wasn't seeing something that I should be seeing - unless, like my FTO, I was that familiar with the "normal" behavior of people in the environment? To me, the empty sidewalk was just a normal, ordinary sidewalk that had no meaning at all, but to my FTO the absence of that sign was something that triggered a bell in his head and made him curious enough to find out why it wasn't there when it should have been.

    You gotta wear out some shoe leather, talk to a lot of people, spend time watching them and soaking up their behaviors, and put in the time to develop that kind of awareness. We ought not to throw experienced people away as carelessly as we often do in this industry - especially as we are going to need that higher level of surveillance in the years to come, I'm thinking, and you can't get it from rookies.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-17-2014 at 04:15 PM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    385

    Default

    What I notice about how most warm body companies are managed is that it is all about managing the current crisis with out looking to the future in regards to problems. It is the burning out of good guards to cover for those who will sleep, get intoxicated or generally not do rounds on site. It is the forcing thru threat of being fired to show up sick only to infect the whole entire site with what ever bug they have gotten. The long hours of being up for 36-72 hours combined with the long distances of driving that could be potentially dangerous to everyone on the road. This dollar amount for "institutional knowledge" has no value for these companies who sell faux security to clients looking for the cheapest rates to secure their site. We are pawns to be moved around at will until we either quit or are fired then a new batch of people will come in to fill the ranks. This is why the industry resistance to training,properly equipping and paying the guards they hire because they are just passing thru until they can get a better job outside the industry. Hence the race to the bottom comments I have been posting in other parts of the forum. Employee candidates used to be a zero sum game but with loosing restrictions and hiring illegals to secure sites like in California, a whole new pool of potential employees have opened up to them. This pool of cheap labor is worth more to them then "institutional knowledge" ever could be. Security for most is just a job to get off being unemployed and for the most part is not a career.
    Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
    Spiro Agnew

    Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

    Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by psycosteve View Post
    Security for most is just a job to get off being unemployed and for the most part is not a career.
    Remember, you have a very narrow window on the world of security. Yes, there's the sphere of lowest-bid-contract warm-body just-passing-through "faux security", as you put it, but that's certainly NOT all there is to this field, by a long shot.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Remember, you have a very narrow window on the world of security. Yes, there's the sphere of lowest-bid-contract warm-body just-passing-through "faux security", as you put it, but that's certainly NOT all there is to this field, by a long shot.
    We as human beings can only judge by our experiences and the information we have on hand. My view may be narrow but my view of it is very clear. Until I have seen the bigger picture this is what all that I have known. With out any sarcasm or intentionally belittling you but what you suggest to broaden my horizons in this regard? This is not a challenge by any stretch but just a simple question being asked.
    Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
    Spiro Agnew

    Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

    Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by psycosteve View Post
    We as human beings can only judge by our experiences and the information we have on hand. My view may be narrow but my view of it is very clear.
    As I said, I agree with what you say about the contract side of security.

    What you suggest to broaden my horizons in this regard?
    Not knowing what your background is, I'd be somewhat pressed to advise you specifically, but there are a number of government (federal or otherwise) and proprietary security operations that are run quite differently from contract security. You might look into some of those, see what they require, and then you should be able to determine what you need to do to make yourself eligible for those positions.

    A very different side of security involves the technology, if you're interested in that aspect. People who can design, install and maintain security systems (access systems, intrusion/fire sensors, CCTV, lighting, communication, etc.) are almost always in demand, and I can't see that diminishing any time in the future. For that, you would probably need to start by getting some basic training in how computer networks function generally, and then get more specific training in the type of system you'd like to work with.

    Executive protection might offer you some opportunities, and you can also consider an increasing number of degrees in the field that would prepare you for advancement on the business/management side.

    On a related but somewhat different note, there are opportunities in specialties such as commercial/organized theft investigations, fraud prevention, maritime security, nuclear/chemical and other high-risk facilities, cargo theft/tampering prevention, white-collar crime investigations, etc.

    Another field that involves security is that of emergency management/preparedness, which has both public and private opportunities.

    As I said, I'm limited by a lack of knowledge about your background, but be assured that contract security (which I can easily understand that you find lacking in both challenge and opportunities) is just one slice of a bigger pie.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-21-2014 at 10:23 PM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts