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  1. #1
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    Default Best Practices and Policies

    I'm doing research for a couple hospitals and am looking for Best Practices and Policies for Armed Security in a Hospital. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    My response is more for all security at hospitals. I had an EW case a couple of years ago where the "security department" consisted of a few maintenance people that had security duties assigned to them. None of them had any type of security background or training and the "Director of Security" was actually the Director of Maintenance whose claim to fame was a boilers license. He had absolutely no security experience. This was a mental health hospital that had issues with unruly patients.

    So, my recommendation is to have actual trained security (armed or unarmed) reporting to an actual trained, qualified security director.






  3. #3
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    The hospitals currently have unarmed security (dedicated to the role of security) with a qualified director, however, they are looking at adding armed officers (Act 235 certified) and the administration would feel a lot better if we could present Best Practices and Policies to them from a hospital that already has security in place.

  4. #4
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    Unfortunately the IAHSS does not currently have such a database of Best Practices. There is an ASIS healthcare committee currently working on Best Practices for security in the healthcare industry. Be advised that any information shared with you will not be Best Practices, but individual company polices and procedures.






  5. #5
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    Thank you for your assistance. I'd have replied earlier but got busy tracking down resources.

  6. #6
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    Default Best Practices and Policies

    Sir

    Here is a good page to get some information: http://www.hcpro.com/HOM-41039-742/C...-officers.html "Healthcare Security and Emergency Management, August 1, 2004"

    The hospital you are advising will be taking on significant liability by arming their security officers. Make sure you obtain the most current and accurate data to limit the risk. In addition check with the International Association for Healthcare Security & Safety (IAHSS) for the most up to date information.

    Good luck to you.

    Carlos Lorie
    Last edited by Carlos Lorie; 06-30-2014 at 12:45 PM.

  7. #7
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    In the absence of a model that's specific to healthcare, you should be looking at other authoritative sources such as this:

    http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/fil...es%201s....pdf

    What's important to note is not just the specific contents, but the topical scope of the document. This tells you something very important all by itself - namely the various aspects of armed security operations that your own policies and procedures should address.

    There are some things that you should already know without reference to any other source:

    1. There must be a risk assessment. Although not free, this should probably include information from the CAPS index as well as any relevant information from the police department CA unit regarding the incidence of crime and violent incidents in the immediate neighborhood of the hospital's facilities. There would also, of course, be a review of the hospital's own historical experience from internal security reports. Ideally, this would cover several years and would be statistically analyzed by type of incident, etc. If the risk assessment does not support the need for armed security staff, there's no need to proceed further.
    2. There must be a selection and training requirement.
    3. There must be a set of relevant polices and procedures that cover the weapons/ammunition that are allowed, the circumstances under which they may be used, and what procedures must be followed if and when they are used.
    4. There must be a legal review of all the above by hospital counsel or a competent legal consultant, and the hospital's liability carrier should be part of the review.

    The hospital must understand that even "best practices" from any source, including IAHSS, merely inform the hospital's decision makers. They are not intended to substitute for the hospital's own decision-making process. Given the wide range of sizes and types of hospitals, the wide variety of environments in which they operate, the differences in populations they serve and the services they provide, the emergence of stand-alone ancillary facilities such as ambulatory surgery centers and urgent care centers, no "best practices" can do much more than provide the framework for decision-making.

    One thing worth noting: The Johns Hopkins study on hospital shootings (covering 2000 to 2011) showed that 23% of all hospital shootings, and 50% of those in the emergency room, were COMMITTED WITH A SECURITY OFFICER'S WEAPON. This points out the need to make sure that high-retention holsters are part of the equation along with a policy about what state semi-automatic weapons are to be carried in. Whether or not so-called "smart" weapons will become part of the solution to the loss-of-firearm problem remains to be seen.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 07-01-2014 at 10:13 AM.
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