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  1. #21

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    Default I'd go with either Roman or Nazi ranks. LOL.

    http://s_van_dorst.tripod.com/Ancien...hierarchy.html

    Praefectus Imperator Praepositus Tribunus Sesquiplicarius and of course Centurian are catchy.


    Then you got Gruppenführer, Oberführer, Oberleutnant Hauptmann


    Best rank ever...."Subcommander Zero" claimed by some Latin American guerrilla leader, going to the "zero" rather than 'one' at claim to top rank.

    If "Defcon 1" is all out nuclear war, the next step from Defcon 2 which is everything but ICBM launching, my next bad spy/adventure novel will be titled "Defcon Zero"

  2. #22

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    Default Companies That Use Military Ranks (Seems Little Goofy)

    I can even think of several law enforcment agencies near me that did some different things with rank titles over the years. (There is a good chance Newby will even recognize one or more of these!)

    One suburban PD a bunch of years back did away with military sounding rank and titles. They went to "softer" sounding titles. For example, instead of sergeant it was police supervisor. Instead of lieutenant it was police manger. Instead of chief it was police administrator. Last I heard, they once again haver a Police Chief and have reverted back to more traditional ranks.

    Another suburban PD a little further north of the previously mentioned one had a Police Chief that I think had been former Air Force. As a result, he was a big proponent of career development. They had about a dozen or more possible sergeant ranks! Keep in mind that this is a department of about 27 sworn, thus they have about half a dozen sergeant positions as most. I actually liked the concept though. He thorougly spelled out what you needed to get promoted to sergeant (as in "buck sergeant" with no rockers). You had to have so much experience as a police officer, so much college, so many MN BCA course, etc. To move up and get a rocker you had to have more experience, college, additional BCA management/supervision courses, etc.

    Keep in mind that this was during a time that it was very uncommon for Minnesota city or county cops with sergeant chevrons to have rockers underneath them. (Granted, the Minnesota State Patrol had District Sergeants back in the day with three up and one or two down, but they have effectively been converted to lieutenants many years ago.) Now, at least in the cases of Minneapolis and Saint Paul Police, I think BOTH agencies have sergeants stripes with rockers. Also, I think Saint Paul has, or at least had under the previous chief, commanders who wore rank insignia similar to a military cadet. (I think it was a pair of side by side diamonds.)

    A sheriff's office I was familair with was very top heavy. After the elected sheriff, they had a Chief Deputy Sheriff, Undersheriff, AND an Assistant Sheriff! I have no idea who outranked whom. For rank insignia somebody must of had stars, bars, AND lightning bolts! I was somewhat tempted to ask that sheriff if was going to add an additional position and call the person Little Jesus, but I thought better of it.

    It is sort of interesting, too, to see chiefs of small department wearing clusters of stars on their collar. I have been tempted to ask a few if they were Major General Of The National Police.

    Fire service also can be interesting with rank and insignia. I can think of a fire department that I used to work with that tons of ranks. It seemed like almost everyone was a lieutenant, captain, first assitant chief, second assistant chief, district chief or batallion chief. Most fire departments I have seen sue the bugles on the collar for rank insignia. However, I have seen at least one fire chief in the past, who was a Minnesota Army National Guard Colonel, wear his Colonel eagles on his fire uniform shirt as rank insignia. As an aside, it seems like most fire departments go right from firefighter to lieutenant or captain, completely bypassing the NCO sounding ranks. That having been said, I did hear of a fire department recently with sergeants!
    Last edited by Jim1348; 09-18-2012 at 06:22 PM. Reason: Details

  3. #23

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    Jim 1348's post reminded me of the time I had to work dayshift as a dispatcher for a small PD. All of the senior officers were lieutenants, and of course three of them worked dayshift along with a sergeant. There simply wasn't enough to do - except constantly bug me. I told the woman when she got back from vacation that I would never again work days in such a brass heavy place. (To this day I refuse to work days at any place - too many suits, too many gold badges...)

  4. #24

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    Default Companies That Use Military Ranks (Seems Little Goofy)

    On a different forum some time back they was some discussion about the sergeant rank in the New Orleans Police Department. If I can find it again I will psot a link. I think the gist of it is sergeants are not considered a supervisory rank there! If I recall correctly. you can test for sergeant after a few years, but you will be made sergeant anyway with a few more years of experience, but, again, it is not a supervisor, apparently lieutenants are the first line of supervision.

    I used to work with a copper a bunch of years back that went to some training with a copper from in or near Chicago. The topic of promotional process came up and the Minnesota guy went on the realte the lengthly process of in basket assessment centers, oral interviews before a panel pf superior officers, further psychological examination, review of educational background, in depth review of experience, etc.

    When it was the Chicago guys turn he related that he went to an armed robbery call, the suspect comes out armed and the copper shot him. Essentially he was promoted to sergeant after that. We sort of joked about it later that it was almost like a "field promotion" that you would see in old World War II movies!

    Perhaps our Canadina members on here can refresh my memory on the RCMP. I seem to recall reading in the past that they have MANY different sergeant ranks.

    Also, as sort of a trivia question here, does anybody ever recal seeing any United States Lae Enforcement agencies with sergeant chevrons pointing down, similar to say the UK and other non-US countries?
    Last edited by Jim1348; 09-18-2012 at 08:07 PM. Reason: Details

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1348 View Post
    Also, as sort of a trivia question here, does anybody ever recal seeing any United States Lae Enforcement agencies with sergeant chevrons pointing down, similar to say the UK and other non-US countries?
    San Fran?......

  6. #26
    zm88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squid View Post
    http://s_van_dorst.tripod.com/Ancien...hierarchy.html

    Praefectus Imperator Praepositus Tribunus Sesquiplicarius and of course Centurian are catchy.


    Then you got Gruppenführer, Oberführer, Oberleutnant Hauptmann


    Best rank ever...."Subcommander Zero" claimed by some Latin American guerrilla leader, going to the "zero" rather than 'one' at claim to top rank.

    If "Defcon 1" is all out nuclear war, the next step from Defcon 2 which is everything but ICBM launching, my next bad spy/adventure novel will be titled "Defcon Zero"
    Field Marshall Squid...
    Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

  7. #27

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    Default Military Ranks

    US Park Police and Vermont State Police wear their Chevrons facing down.

  8. #28

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    When I was managing a large security force in Calif., I started with no ranking structure. I soon realized that I need a structure for two reasons, 1. So the client and public would be able to quickly ID who was in-charge. 2. For a little added incentive for my informal leaders to apply for promotion.

    After a few rounds of changes, this was the result in order of pay and responsibility:

    Security Guard – unarmed, no insignia
    Security Officer – armed, no insignia
    Lead Security Officer – sergeant stripes. This was a non-supervisory position
    Security Officer Supervisor – Lieutenant bars. This was a supervisory position
    Management – One gold star. This was a management position

    I used the militay isignia becasue it was easy to purchase and the public/clients already knew what it ment.

  9. #29

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    In high school, I was in JROTC (Cadet 1st Lieutenant), but didn't get off on having the title, I just didn't want to take Gym.

    I was a Corporal while in Corrections, and a Sergeant in another company.

    At my current job (small regional Horse-piddle), we have no rank structure.

    I don't really see an issue with military style ranking, it's easily identifiable, BUT... I have seen a "Chief" (with 5 star general pins) and his Colonel (Full bird pin) wife... That's just ridiculous.

    BTW, I am 25 lol
    "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

  10. #30
    Black Caesar's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SecureTN View Post
    In high school, I was in JROTC (Cadet 1st Lieutenant), but didn't get off on having the title, I just didn't want to take Gym.

    I was a Corporal while in Corrections, and a Sergeant in another company.

    At my current job (small regional Horse-piddle), we have no rank structure.

    I don't really see an issue with military style ranking, it's easily identifiable, BUT... I have seen a "Chief" (with 5 star general pins) and his Colonel (Full bird pin) wife... That's just ridiculous.

    BTW, I am 25 lol
    Where's my salute son, I reached the exalted Navy ROTC rank of Cadet Commander .

    As for the Chief stars, it's nothing major, but it is a minor peeve of mine, seeing small town and/or special jurisdiction police chiefs wearing 4 or 5 stars like their names were McArthur or something lol, usually accompanied by some overwhelming sense of importance that far outweighs their actual place in life. Examples here and here. You just gotta wonder about the ego and mental health of the guy who needs all that "gedunk" on a police uniform. i can understand it for big departments with 4-5000 sworn officers maybe, but when you've got like 6 guys and 1 broken down patrol car, 4 stars on your collar looks a bit silly lol.

    People I've personally worked for in law enforcement jobs have been much more tasteful and sensible.
    The Chief at the Hospital PD I used to work for wore 2 stars (and only because his deputy chief wore 1 star), the Chief of the small town PD I worked for (he retired from Dallas PD) wore 1 star when he wore anything on his collar at all (and being out in the country, sometimes he didn't wear a uniform at all).

    The Chief of my current department wears 1 star on the rare occasion he wears a uniform (like at graduation or funerals). We don't have deputy chiefs, the next rank after Chief is technically Captain (2 bars) although after the last captain left to take an assistant chief position at the sheriff's office, he was replaced by a Lieutenant.
    Last edited by Black Caesar; 09-20-2012 at 08:49 AM.
    ~Black Caesar~
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