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    I am looking for a few books to improve my investigation skills.
    Is there any books someone could recomend on investigating or witness questioning & interrorgation?

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    Curtis Baillie's Avatar
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    I'll start your list off with The Process of Investigation, 3rd Edition by John Tsukayama and Charles Sennewald

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren14 View Post
    I am looking for a few books to improve my investigation skills.
    Is there any books someone could recomend on investigating or witness questioning & interrorgation?
    "Interrorgation" would be something like waterboarding, wouldn't it? I don't think you can do that.

    Just kidding. It was a funny typo.

    Not sure if you're referring to field interviews, formal investigations (or what type), etc., but here are some suggestions:

    1. Eyewitness Testimony - Elizabeth Loftus. Although it's a bit "academic", Dr Loftus is an expert in the factors that make eyewitnesses so UNreliable, and everyone who investigates anything that involves gathering eyewitness evidence (whether criminal, industrial accidents, airplane crashes, etc.) should read this book.

    2. Investigations in the Workplace - Eugene Ferraro.

    3. Private Security and the Investigative Process - Charles Nemeth.

    4. Interviewing and Interrogation - Don Rabon.

    5. Business Background Investigations - Cynthia Hetherington.

    6. Effective Interviewing and Interrogation Techniques - Gordon & Fleisher

    7. Background Investigation for Law Enforcement - Van Ritch

    8. Corporate Investigations - Montgomery & Majeski, especially Chapter 7: The Statement as Crime Scene

    9. The Gentle Art of Interviewing and Interrogation - Royal and Schutt

    10. What Every BODY Is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People - Navarro and Karlins. This book is one of the better ones about the art of reading body language.

    Beware the large number of popular "how to tell if anyone is lying" books out there, which trade on people's natural desire to turn themselves into "lie detecting machines". The problem is, there are people who can lie nearly imperceptibly in terms of their body language (psychopaths), and these are the very people we often need to investigate. You can't use body-language skills with these people. You can only corner them with a painstaking process of disproving the factual content of their statements and repeatedly confronting them with their lies. Even after all that, you may never get a confession from them and you just have to proceed with whatever actions you're going to take (dismissal, prosecution, etc.) without the benefit of a confession, which is perfectly permissible and legally defensible, contrary to many corporate investigators who mistakenly believe that you have to have a confession.

    And this is another point while you're studying investigation. While criminal and civil investigations share many techniques, they do not have to meet the same "burden of proof". A criminal action requires "proof beyond a reasonable doubt". For civil actions, "the preponderance of the evidence" is what is required. What this means (and this has been upheld in all 50 states) is that for a civil or job-related action such as dismissal, suit for recovery of embezzlement losses, etc. - and even as a defense against a suit for defamatory employer references brought by a dismissed employee - all that is needed is an objective, well-documented, and reasonably thorough investigation showing that it is *more likely than not* that the individual committed the act in question.

    I have other books in my library pertaining to certain kinds of specialized investigations (financial/fraud, sexual harassment, malfeasance, accidents, computer forensics, etc.) if you need more suggestions.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-11-2012 at 08:01 AM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

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    P.S.

    I mentioned psychopaths (sometimes lumped in with sociopaths) in my earlier post. All investigators should have an understanding of these people and what makes them tick because they're not going to break down and gush out the details of their deeds just because an investigator looks cross-eyed at them, and they live by a code that most decent people can't fathom unless they've studied them (or lived with one). It's possible that 1 in 5 people have at least some psychopathic tendencies, and I would bet that they account for at least 30% of the criminal and other misbehaviors (misusing corporate property, falsification of credentials, abuse of power, sabotaging the work of others, etc.) that trigger corporate investigations.

    The Anatomy of Motive - Douglas and Olshaker

    Snakes in Suits: When Psychopaths Go To Work - Babiak and Hare

    Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of Psychopaths Among Us - also by Hare

    Inside the Criminal Mind - Samenow

    Small Criminals Among Us: How to Recognize and Change Children's Antisocial Behavior - Czudner


    This last book might seem out of place to someone who will probably be investigating adults, but it takes you from a "problem child's" first revealing bad behaviors, through adolescent delinquency and on into the adult that they ultimately become, so it's very enlightening. Dr Samenow's book explores some of the same process, a bit differently.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-11-2012 at 08:31 AM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

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    Sorry for the typo at least you had a good laugh from it.
    I would like to keep the thread security related but I don’t want to put any boundaries on it.
    At the moment I am looking for books related to criminal investigations including but not only thefts in the work place, information theft.
    Interviewing an amateur criminal is easy but interrogating a psychopath is a totally different ball game.
    I read a book by Stan Walters “Principles of Kinesic Interview and Interrogation” & it helped me crack a few cases but there are a few criminals that I just couldn’t get the truth out of so studying a psychopath would be a great help.
    In one specific case I found a security officer at two different thefts. I questioned him & had him polygraphed but came up with nothing. I then gave him some slack & caught him on a covert camera.
    At the moment I am after a criminal that is fairly high up in a syndicate. The problem is that he is also in a high position in the company we are protecting. The problem is he doesn’t get his hands dirty so the questions I can ask him are limited. I have managed to get one of his smaller men to talk & he has identified him but refuses to testify against him.

    I have found a copy of Sankes in Suits in my library so I will start with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren14 View Post
    At the moment I am after a criminal that is fairly high up in a syndicate. The problem is that he is also in a high position in the company we are protecting. The problem is he doesn’t get his hands dirty so the questions I can ask him are limited. I have managed to get one of his smaller men to talk & he has identified him but refuses to testify against him.
    This sounds like a situation that requires sophisticated investigative skills, perhaps requiring specialists in methods like following money trails, conducting covert and/or "sting" operations, etc. Also, since it appears that you're an outside security contractor, it would be absolutely necessary to obtain the client's permission to conduct such an investigation.

    My suggestion, on the basis of the little that I know now, would be to take your suspicions to the top level of the company (who I presume aren't involved) and let them decide whether they want to hire a specialist firm like Kroll's or someone like that to look into the situation.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-11-2012 at 09:45 PM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

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    Quote Originally Posted by SecTrainer View Post
    This sounds like a situation that requires sophisticated investigative skills, perhaps requiring specialists in methods like following money trails, conducting covert and/or "sting" operations, etc. Also, since it appears that you're an outside security contractor, it would be absolutely necessary to obtain the client's permission to conduct such an investigation.
    I have taken it to a senior management level & have been told to bring them facts not here say.
    To cut a long story short I have been thrown in the deep end of a swimming pool & told to swim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren14 View Post
    I have taken it to a senior management level & have been told to bring them facts not here say.
    To cut a long story short I have been thrown in the deep end of a swimming pool & told to swim.
    I would suggest that you re-focus on the specific security duties outlined in your contract with this client, and if you happen to observe something relevant to this situation while performing your security duties (such as unusual activities by this individual or others you believe are involved), simply report your observations in separate confidential memos to management. Keep piling up this information on their desk, bit by bit, and hopefully a tipping point will eventually be reached where they'll realize that they need to bring in professional investigators.

    Meanwhile, you've done your job by advising management of your suspicions, and it's on them to handle it properly.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

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    It has been reported to their internal security department.
    I usually do catch them in the end but I feel I could speed up the process with a bit more knowledge.

    If I remember correctly Stan Walters says that 70% of the people you interogate will be psychopaths, How accurate is that figure?

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    Curtis Baillie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren14 View Post
    It has been reported to their internal security department.
    I usually do catch them in the end but I feel I could speed up the process with a bit more knowledge.

    If I remember correctly Stan Walters says that 70% of the people you interogate will be psychopaths, How accurate is that figure?
    I have interviewed/interrogated many hundreds of people. I can only remember a handful. One of them just stood up and walked out of the interview.

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