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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Default Written Perfomance Plans

    A little background for my site. We are a 202 bed hospital in a suburban setting. I am the assistant director of the Security department. I have 3 supervisors and 12 officers that report to me.

    Lately I've noticed a real drop in performance from several officers across all shifts. I am starting to write out performance plans for each position on each shift. Do any of you have any experiance in writing or using such a plan?
    Any advice on using such a plan? Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    MA
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    1,605

    Default

    When i was director of security at the roller rink/club i typed of a detailed job description and the expectations of my staff. I then called a team meeting, handed them out and went over them as a group. i informed them in 2 weeks ( it was suppose to be 1 but the owner wanted the extra week) I'd conduct a follow up and if performance didn't improve then i would terminate staff. I'm not sure if thats what you were looking for but there isn't any generic template for something like this. Meet monthly as a group if not more and do indi individual coaching if necessary, at the same time you cant hold hands.
    Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    6,566

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrickmad View Post
    A little background for my site. We are a 202 bed hospital in a suburban setting. I am the assistant director of the Security department. I have 3 supervisors and 12 officers that report to me.

    Lately I've noticed a real drop in performance from several officers across all shifts. I am starting to write out performance plans for each position on each shift. Do any of you have any experiance in writing or using such a plan?
    Any advice on using such a plan? Any help would be appreciated.
    Okay, first of all I think you're misusing the term "performance plan". A performance plan isn't written for job positions. A performance plan is prepared as a written memorial of a corrective action that is being taken with respect to a specific individual. It spells out what performance has been unacceptable, what changes are expected, how those changes will be measured, a time frame in which they must be made, and a consequence if the expectations are not met.

    So, for instance:

    PERFORMANCE PLAN

    EMPLOYEE: ____________________________

    SUPERVISOR: _________________________

    DATE: _______________________________

    REASON FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION:

    CORRECTIVE STEPS TO BE TAKEN:

    ...etc.

    It sounds to me like you're talking about job descriptions, which are what you write for each different position (officer, shift lead, supervisor etc.). There's tons of information about creating job descriptions available on the Interweb.

    Specifically, the "expectations" portion of the job description. These are often faulty or missing entirely from job descriptions and it sounds like yours might need to be revised. There are important LEGAL reasons that expectations should be incorporated into every job description, which is the document that formally defines the requirements, qualifications and expectations for each individual who holds a given position and which applies equally to ALL individuals who hold that position. This document is critical in a hundred different ways.

    One thing, though. No ex-post-facto stuff! You can't begin to take corrective actions unless and until they have been informed regarding their job expectations. Again, these expectations should be part of the JOB DESCRIPTION (you don't inform people about expectations by hitting them with a performance plan), and if you need to revise the job descriptions every person needs to receive a revised copy, they should sign one copy and that goes in their personnel file.

    Then you give everyone on the team time to equilibrate to the new expectations, with a lot of verbal feedback during this period. This should be a NONPUNITIVE period.

    After that, then you can see who might need to have performance plans written.

    1. Communicate your expectations by necessary revisions to the job descriptions and distribution of copies to each employee.

    2. Provide a period of equilibration and adjustment to these expectations, during which you help them make these adjustments.

    3. Only after this period would you then begin to take corrective actions, ONE of which MIGHT be the preparation of a performance plan for specific individuals (there are other corrective actions available, of course, such as verbal warnings, written warnings, etc).

    A performance plan is just one corrective tool (a variant of the written warning), and it's generally used for PERSISTENTLY poor performance, not the occasional slipup.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 04-05-2012 at 10:09 AM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    25

    Default Thanks

    Good info. I'm glad I've found this site.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    823

    Default Be prepared for reactions...

    If it is a problem among several officers, then look into what's causing it and correct it. When I took over as a lead guard on a site from a fired supervisor I couldn't believe some of the stuff that was going on - until I found out the terminated sup allowed it and did it himself.

    Explanations as to why this needs to be done or that isn't allowed are also helpful - they can by succinct, but understandable so as not to appear arbitrary.

    As noted, with individual officers watch them after they receive their plan or warning. We had one guy who had some anger issues but was in the past a stellar officer and was going through some personal stuff. He was given 30 days to improve. Instead, he spent the next two weeks bad mouthing the entire department, keyed the supervisor's personal car, and quit with no notice. Hindsight is 20/20, but given that his reaction to his performance plan was negative, he should have been fired on the spot or within a week.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,566

    Default

    (I apologize for uppercase below - I'm not yelling but bolding has been turned off on this new version of the board for some reason.)

    A performance plan is typically the final step prior to termination. Usually, you would have issued verbal and written warnings before implementing a performance plan.

    If a performance plan is implemented without issuing prior warnings (and hence, opportunities for the employee to correct the problem), it would come as a complete surprise to the employee who had not been given any indication that his performance was not satisfactory until he gets hit over the head with this performance plan. And when that happens the performance plan is quite likely to have the opposite effect than improving/salvaging this employee.

    One of the biggest problems in many companies is a lack of consistency, objectivity and fairness in supervising employees that amounts to supervisory malpractice and malfeasance. Let me explain how I have illustrated these concepts to new supervisors:

    _________________________________

    Consistency: What I expect of you today is exactly what I expected yesterday and clearly told you I would expect - nothing more and nothing less. My judgments regarding your performance are never influenced by the state of my digestion or whether I had a fight with my teenager before coming to work. When I approach you on the job site, you don't have to wonder which one of my "multiple personalities" you're about to meet.

    Objectivity: I am concerned with how well you fulfill the expectations related to your position and work with your fellow employees. Can I trust you to do your job properly when I'm not looking? That's it. It has nothing to do with whether I "like" you or not.

    Fairness: I HAVE ONE JOB, AND ONE ONLY: Leading my team to success in fulfilling our defined role within the organization. This means that I guide, train, equip, encourage, OBSERVE (how many supervisors do this?) and, when necessary, correct the members of my team according to the demands of our mission and the standards set forth by the organization. These different activities are not "several supervisory jobs", but one unified job. There is no supervisory job in the world that does not require all of these activities to one degree or another.

    As such, I give you all of the information and every tool that you need to succeed in your job. I make sure that you understand what's expected of you, and if those expectations change I'll make sure you have an opportunity to adjust to the changes. If you have questions, I can and will answer them properly AND promptly. I communicate with you regarding your shortcomings in a constructive way that helps you to improve your performance. I never tear you down on a personal level. AND...I tell you when you've done the job well, and NOT JUST WHEN YOU'VE SCREWED UP. What's more, I treat every single member of the team in EXACTLY the same way.

    _________________________________

    When such a supervisor does need to issue a warning, or in some cases a performance plan, employees tend to react very differently to these disciplinary actions because such a supervisor is respected. On the flip side, when such a supervisor hands out praise, it actually means something to the employee - again, because it comes from someone he respects.

    Supervisors are human beings, and on a personal level it's inevitable that they will "like" or "connect with" some employees more so than others. BUT A GOOD SUPERVISOR IS AWARE OF THIS, and scrupulously prevents his personal feelings from ruining (yes, that's the word!) his OWN performance as a supervisor. If you can't do that, you don't possess the maturity, the personal insight or the self-discipline that are required to be a great supervisor.

    ALWAYS REMEMBER THIS: In any "performance-related" situation, there are always TWO performances that come into play - not only that of your employee, BUT ALSO YOUR OWN. Did the employee fail you, or did you fail the employee? Maybe it was a bit of both? I wonder how many employees have been disciplined or fired for situations that actually had their roots in POOR SUPERVISORY PERFORMANCE. A few, perhaps? Yes, I'd say quite a few, especially in our industry where promotions are often made purely because someone's been in the job 3 days longer than someone else and not because they have any real supervisory potential - and then they receive no proper supervisory training whatsoever (which is amazing, considering the multiple levels of liability to which this exposes the company).

    Incidentally, there are 2 other characteristics of a great supervisor - competence and active engagement - but those are subjects for another discussion.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 04-08-2012 at 08:05 PM.
    A man who will not lie to his wife has no regard for her feelings. - Anon.

    My school was so tough we had our own coroner. - Lenny Bruce

    In my neighborhood, you could walk 10 blocks in any direction and never leave the scene of a crime. - Charlie Callas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrickmad View Post
    A little background for my site. We are a 202 bed hospital in a suburban setting. I am the assistant director of the Security department. I have 3 supervisors and 12 officers that report to me.

    Lately I've noticed a real drop in performance from several officers across all shifts. I am starting to write out performance plans for each position on each shift. Do any of you have any experiance in writing or using such a plan?
    Any advice on using such a plan? Any help would be appreciated.
    Honestly, an account's post orders that outline the duties and responsibilities of each position within the account should already be written.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    25

    Default Back to Basic

    I was trying to avoid the term Job Description because the client already has one. However I see it's the most appropriate title.

    The goal is to provide a written document detailing what I expect from each postion and shift. If perfomance is still sub par then disciplinary action would take place.

    No new post orders in years.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    660

    Default Have ANY changes happened recently that might be causing this?

    I've noticed companies can be incredibly "tone deaf" when it comes to guards "job satisfaction".

    Did schedules get recently "re-assigned" so everyone is out of their comfort zone?

    Did some new opportunity pop up in the area, with better pay and perks?


    How exactly has their work slipped?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    25

    Default

    I will offer some more background.

    I sometimes feel like administration feels like having security is a burden. There is usually not much support for security from administration.There is also not alot of support from our company either. I have a hard time believing I'm the only one who has ever been in this situation.

    I am committed to this department and to trying to change some things.

    Latlely I have noticed several officers have been giving sub-par results. Uniforms are wrinkled and in poor condition. Shift logs have been poorly written or not turned in at all. These are bare minimum things IMO. I just wanted to define the bare-minimum for all my officers.

    There have been no major changes to the job that would explain the drop in performance. I believe it was just a domino effect where one officer does poorly and the decent ones see no incentive to maintain thier performance.
    Last edited by Patrickmad; 04-11-2012 at 02:52 AM.

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