Quote Originally Posted by Gshock View Post
If it unarmed like you say and more regulation enforcement, I can deal with that. But if it would be foolish from security/operation standpoint to pull gate duty without a weapon. Some people say going there is suicide without a weapon, what they fail to realize is there's plenty of non combat troops at these bases who never use their weapons the whole deployment.
Generally, it's enforcing regulations and has nothing to do with armed protection. It wouldn't be a bad job if you could move up but as previously stated, it's going to be difficult considering the large amounts of former contractors who've already established a reputation. I would agree with you about doing something high risk unarmed is not smart.

Quote Originally Posted by Gshock View Post
My friend in the Army told me that they use Ugandans pull gate duty on some posts in Afghanistan, I wonder their training and experience is? He told he's always iffy about their capabilities.
Those third country contractors work for a company called SOC-SMG. Obviously they are hired to save money by paying more than their local economy pays, but it's still cheaper for the United States. They are suppose to be ex-military but that doesn't always hold true. There have been some incidents where they fall asleep, steal or lie but that can happen regardless of what nationality they are. When they are caught, there is either a reduce in pay or they're sent home and blacklisted from contract work and SOC-SMG doesn't screw around.

Quote Originally Posted by Gshock View Post
I have heard of the Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo like you said. And Qatar those are older contracts from a few years back, not sure which remain active. Hell, I was looking into CSA Kuwait,until I found out that got charged with embezzlement and fraud charges and Triple Canopy took over. I heard of Dyncorp holding passports and not allowing you to leave etc..
Camp Bondsteel is still active, but just changed from ITT Systems providing the security to Dyncorp. Dyncorp won the contract because they're paying $38,000 vs. $65,000. Just be careful and go with both or your eyes open for the long haul with a backup plan.

Quote Originally Posted by Gshock View Post
That being said the security industry in California, has taken a major hit. Not in the executive protection sector, but patrol and other contracts like transit. Everyone is becoming cutthroat and underbidding making the wages unbearable, which is why I am considering overseas work.
Maybe you should try executive protection? It may be something that can pay well, and give you the experience to get into overseas work. Is there a lot of entry level work in California for executive protection after some training? Just curious.