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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    1,209

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    I've worked security at a level 1 trauma center for 10 years, and I've been a trainer there for 7 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by tanko View Post
    There are several posts on this forum about hospital security.

    I've worked hospital security for a few years, and the above posting about dealing with mentally disturbed and intoxicated people holds true. If your hospital has a chapel in it, you will get transients that think they can sleep in the chapel.

    My one piece of advice is don't believe what staff will tell you about someone being on a two-physician hold. Make sure to always see the paperwork before doing anything. I've seen former security officers get in serious trouble for simply taking the word of a front desk clerk or a nurse.
    I would argue to do whatever the nurse tells you to do, just articulate it well in your report. But only do what a nurse or doctor tell you. Never a HUC or nursing assistant. But also go with what your policies state. I rarely see the paper holds. I don't need to. As long as the nurse or doctor say they are on a hold, that's good enough, like I said though, just articulate it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nauticus View Post
    While I know everyone winds up watching a patient at one time or another, it's definitely not a good idea.

    The limit of a security guard's capability with potentially psychotic patients ends literally at calling to a specialist (nurse, doctor, etc) if anything happens. Even through conversation, a security guard is not a psychiatric nurse or a psychologist; even regular conversation could be harmful to some patients.
    That all depends on the individual hospitals policies. Not all are the same.
    Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    1,209

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    Quote Originally Posted by tanko View Post
    There are several posts on this forum about hospital security.

    I've worked hospital security for a few years, and the above posting about dealing with mentally disturbed and intoxicated people holds true. If your hospital has a chapel in it, you will get transients that think they can sleep in the chapel.

    My one piece of advice is don't believe what staff will tell you about someone being on a two-physician hold. Make sure to always see the paperwork before doing anything. I've seen former security officers get in serious trouble for simply taking the word of a front desk clerk or a nurse.
    10 years, and I've only found 1 transient sleeping in our chapel.
    Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrickmad View Post
    Tanko is referring to a hold a physician can place on a patient if they feel the patient is a threat to themselves or others. Basically if a physician feels a patient is not able to make good decisions the patient will be held against their will in the hospital or transferred to a psych hospital until they are deemed fit to be released. Here in GA it's called a 10-13 in CA I believe it's a 5150.

    These patients also must have someone outside their room 24/7. At my hospital we are used as sitters and a good deal of our time is used watching these patients.

    So even when they are not violent or aggressive we spend a lot of time with these patients.

    But we do other things besides working with psych patients.

    Like:

    Secure patient valuables.
    Relieve the operator as needed.
    Transport deceased patients to the morgue.

    And the usual Security stuff like patrols, escorts, and unlocks.
    In Minnesota, it's called either a "Transportation Hold" or a "72 Hour Hold." Luckilly, at my hospital we are not used to babysit patients. If they are on a hold, in a secured area, and cooperative, we don't really have any involvement with them after searching them and their belongings.

    If they are in an unsecured area, but cooperative, a nursing assistant will be used as a "one to one" (babysitter). Secured area or not, if they are uncooperative, threatening to leave, or combative, then security gets called to restrain them. Then we leave and the nurse has to check on them and chart on their condition every 15 minutes.
    Last edited by sgtnewby; 03-26-2012 at 02:47 PM.
    Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    678

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgtnewby View Post
    I've worked security at a level 1 trauma center for 10 years, and I've been a trainer there for 7 years.

    I would argue to do whatever the nurse tells you to do, just articulate it well in your report. But only do what a nurse or doctor tell you. Never a HUC or nursing assistant. But also go with what your policies state. I rarely see the paper holds. I don't need to. As long as the nurse or doctor say they are on a hold, that's good enough, like I said though, just articulate it.

    That all depends on the individual hospitals policies. Not all are the same.
    In my experience staff can be very vague in what they want, coming across as an order and not a request but when it doesn't go the way they want they blame the security officer. Depending on the state laws you could have you license revoked and charged with kidnapping if you restrict someones movement.

    Quote Originally Posted by sgtnewby View Post
    10 years, and I've only found 1 transient sleeping in our chapel.
    Lucky you. I'm jealous! I was always surprised how many would come in, leave after we instructed them to leave only to return five minutes later.

    Quote Originally Posted by sgtnewby View Post
    In Minnesota, it's called either a "Transportation Hold" or a "72 Hour Hold." Luckilly, at my hospital we are not used to babysit patients. If they are on a hold, in a secured area, and cooperative, we don't really have any involvement with them after searching them and their belongings.

    If they are in an unsecured area, but cooperative, a nursing assistant will be used as a "one to one" (babysitter). Secured area or not, if they are uncooperative, threatening to leave, or combative, then security gets called to restrain them. Then we leave and the nurse has to check on them and chart on their condition every 15 minutes.
    You get paid good money, have good benefits, and a good working environment. Can I please work for you guys?


    "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

  5. #15

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    Congrads on the new job. Hospital Security is one of the most challenging and rewarding security positions available. One of my key pieces of advice is this: unless there is an immediate threat to someones well being there is NO REASON to ever enter a patients room without a RN present. That patient is the nurses responsibiity and they are obligated to assit you with that patients care. I learned this lesson the hard way and now I will not be left alone in a patients room with out at minimum another security officer or ideally a RN presnet. If the RN leaves the room I step outside and moniter from doorway. Just my experience, also what my Director has requested we do as well.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    193

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    I've been in hospital security for about half a decade now and what everyone else said is true, even the vagrants in the Chapel. We have one guy we may chase out several times a night. Also the situation above is also fairly common--you make a great scapegoat. You get enough training to lower insurance costs but not enough to deal with the hairy situations. Your also a lot easier to replace than a nurse. It is also not uncommon for someone to die in custody, especially someone at risk for that (like being drunk, having heart problems, and being obese). Ask any cop from an metro PD. You are however lucky to get the tools you have. We get pepper foam and a mini maglight. Don't forget that hopitals are liberal environments also. Lots of internal politics and less-than-practical ideals. Follow the policies and procedures, do what the boss and nurses/doctors tell you to (within reason), and enjoy it. It's a good job. Hospitals are like little towns within towns. Everything from having a mayor and city council to public works and law enforcement (you). Just know the boundaries and you'll be fine.
    Support bacteria. They're the only culture some people have.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,209

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    In regards to training, what does everyone do for training? We spend a week or two going over the smaller things like hospital "new employee orientation," new officer orientation (fire safety, haz-mat, alerts, etc..), county driving course, 1 week of defensive tactics to include baton, OC, Taser, PPCT, handcuffing, patient restraints, etc... You spend a the rest of the time with an FTO. The training period is 6 weeks long. We also require First Responder at a minimum, and if you don't have it when you get hired, we will put you through it.
    Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    364

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    So I've been here a couple months now. I came to the conclusion you guys work at better hospitals then I do, or maybe it's just the enviroment I'm not used too...
    "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    435

    Default Hospital Security Question

    At the risk of pointing out the obvious, because I guess it almost goes without saying, but not all hospitals are created equally. What are you trying to tell us here? Are you not getting training that you want or need? Are you not paid fairly? Is it a hospital that serves a certain type of clientele that is hostile to security?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    364

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    I understand every hospital runs differently. It just seems training, administration, and day to day operations could use a MAJOR overhaul. It also seems (and I'm pretty sure this is typical) that Security is viewed almost as a necessary evil, as opposed to any form of asset.

    I apologize for any sniveling, whining, or ranting... It's just long couple of months

    Thanks all.
    "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

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