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View Full Version : CA - PC 832 - what does that mean?



rocker54321
04-20-2010, 06:26 PM
I'm pretty new to the security line of work. I have my guard card, chemical agent and baton permit and working to get my firearms permit.

While looking for jobs i've noticed a few of the positions (mostly the armed ones) saying that they prefer canidates be PC 832...

I found a little bit of info on it...but i'm still not to clear on what it is. Is anyone here PC 832 or know what it is and how it pertains to security?

N. A. Corbier
04-20-2010, 07:20 PM
I have never understood why guard companies want employees who are PC 832 Part I and II certified. And to be honest, I forget if you folks call it I and II, or A and B, or whatever.

Its Powers of Arrest for peace officers, if I remember correctly. Basically, its an enhanced powers of arrest class that teaches defensive tactics and criminal law for people who have peace officer arrest powers like Park Rangers and Reserve officers.

Hence, I don't really see why security personnel need the certification.

Reverend Red
04-20-2010, 09:15 PM
P.C. 832 is a California Penal Code and the 40 hour class that is commonly given that name is the minimum training requirements to be "in law enforcement." This is not the complete POST requirements needed to be a full-time officer, that is 940 hours. PC 832 allows you to be a uniformed animal control person or a custody transport officer, etc.

If you take the 24 hour firearms portion of this class. (total of 64 hours) You get a Modular POST Level III. This used to be PC 832 Mod 3. If you take another 250 hours or so you can get your Modular POST Level II.

There is not benefit to this class for private security unless you are working a city contract and writing tickets.

Reverend Red
04-20-2010, 09:22 PM
P.C. 832 is a California Penal Code and the 40 hour class that is commonly given that name is the minimum training requirements to be "in law enforcement." This is not the complete POST requirements needed to be a full-time officer, that is 940 hours. PC 832 allows you to be a uniformed animal control person or a custody transport officer, etc.

If you take the 24 hour firearms portion of this class. (total of 64 hours) You get a Modular POST Level III. This used to be PC 832 Mod 3. If you take another 250 hours or so you can get your Modular POST Level II.

There is not benefit to this class for private security unless you are working a city contract and writing tickets.

I forgot to mention that some security companies require this just to ensure that they get the creme of the crop in applicants and not that they have a regulatory requirement. If I were to hire armed officers again I would probably require PC 832 or an AA degree to to prove that the applicant was indeed a security professional.

I would like to see a California security association that provides independent certification for security professionals in this state. CALSAGA tried some time ago and failed miserably. The private industry in this state is too cut-throat and fights anything that will cost more money in time or training.

SoCalEMT
04-20-2010, 11:41 PM
I am PC 832 Arrest certified. I'm currently enrolled at Miramar College for the PC 832 Firearms portion. I believe the certification makes me a better security officer because of the additional training I received (handcuffing, weaponless defense, report writing, penal code laws, etc.). Sure a lot of this stuff probably won't come into play while I'm employed as a security patrol officer but I like knowing if the **** hit the fan I'd have the confidence and knowlegde to act appropriately.

If you're seeking to get a full time gig in LE, a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert will show the agency you are applying to that you are serious about a career in LE. In addition, there are some agencies out there that still use Level III reserve officers which is the equivalent of a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert (prisoner transport, directing traffic, administrative stuff, etc.), if you're interested in a LE reserve position.

If you have any more questions, please feel to PM me.

talon
04-21-2010, 11:21 AM
I am PC 832 Arrest certified. I'm currently enrolled at Miramar College for the PC 832 Firearms portion. I believe the certification makes me a better security officer because of the additional training I received (handcuffing, weaponless defense, report writing, penal code laws, etc.). Sure a lot of this stuff probably won't come into play while I'm employed as a security patrol officer but I like knowing if the **** hit the fan I'd have the confidence and knowlegde to act appropriately.

If you're seeking to get a full time gig in LE, a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert will show the agency you are applying to that you are serious about a career in LE. In addition, there are some agencies out there that still use Level III reserve officers which is the equivalent of a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert (prisoner transport, directing traffic, administrative stuff, etc.), if you're interested in a LE reserve position.

If you have any more questions, please feel to PM me.

Good points.

N. A. Corbier
04-21-2010, 01:46 PM
I am PC 832 Arrest certified. I'm currently enrolled at Miramar College for the PC 832 Firearms portion. I believe the certification makes me a better security officer because of the additional training I received (handcuffing, weaponless defense, report writing, penal code laws, etc.). Sure a lot of this stuff probably won't come into play while I'm employed as a security patrol officer but I like knowing if the **** hit the fan I'd have the confidence and knowlegde to act appropriately.

If you're seeking to get a full time gig in LE, a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert will show the agency you are applying to that you are serious about a career in LE. In addition, there are some agencies out there that still use Level III reserve officers which is the equivalent of a PC 832 Arrest & Firearms cert (prisoner transport, directing traffic, administrative stuff, etc.), if you're interested in a LE reserve position.

If you have any more questions, please feel to PM me.

Do security training companies provide the PC 832 "skills" portion (DT, handcuffing, etc) for security officers, or is this really the only resource for getting security personnel in California trained to an actual standard other than the 80 hour "So You Want to Be A Security Guard" course?

SoCal Public Safety
04-21-2010, 02:24 PM
Having worked in security for a few years and now being in a full POST Basic Academy, I can see both the benefit of the training, and complete uslessness of it for private security.

Like others have said, PC 832 is more for animal control officers, detention officers and even campus security/safety at colleges. It gives them peace officers power to arrest, without full peace officer powers. As a private security officer, you won't have any of those powers, so it's usless.

However, the training itself would be very beneficial. I recieved a lot of training from my former employer, as well as paying to put myself through classes at a local "security school". Hell, I was even a trainer for my past employer, and none of the training I recieved or taught came anywhere near what I'm learning now.

If you want to sharpen your skills and pad your resume a bit, I'd say take the class. The cost is very low and it's a fairly easy class. If you think by taking it you'll magically recieve some extra authority, I wouldn't waste your time. A private person is a private person.

Just my .02

SoCalEMT
04-21-2010, 06:59 PM
Do security training companies provide the PC 832 "skills" portion (DT, handcuffing, etc) for security officers, or is this really the only resource for getting security personnel in California trained to an actual standard other than the 80 hour "So You Want to Be A Security Guard" course?

I've never received any training on handcuffing, weaponless defense, U.S. Constitutional Law, California Constitutional law, search and seizure concepts, etc. from any of my previous security employers. Pretty much I was only trained on the properties specific post orders (mainly observe & report).

I've also completed the required 40 hours of training required by the California BSIS http://www.bsis.ca.gov/customer_service/faqs/security_guard.shtml
but none of it comes even close to 40 hours of training I received while obtaining my PC 832 Arrest cert. The PC 832 Firearms course appears to be far more substantial than the 14 hour course I was required take to obtain my exposed firearm permit too, http://www.bsis.ca.gov/customer_service/faqs/firearms_permit.shtml

That being said, I am sure there are reputable private security companies in California who do train their own above and beyond what is required by law. I just got hired with one of the largest private alarm response companies in southern California and I was shocked when I learned I would ride with an FTO for approximately 30 days before I was cut loose on my own. It seems this company does make the effort to ensure its patrol officers receive good training. We'll see....

caguard
04-22-2010, 11:50 AM
I've never received any training on handcuffing, weaponless defense, U.S. Constitutional Law, California Constitutional law, search and seizure concepts, etc. from any of my previous security employers. Pretty much I was only trained on the properties specific post orders (mainly observe & report).

I've also completed the required 40 hours of training required by the California BSIS http://www.bsis.ca.gov/customer_service/faqs/security_guard.shtml
but none of it comes even close to 40 hours of training I received while obtaining my PC 832 Arrest cert. The PC 832 Firearms course appears to be far more substantial than the 14 hour course I was required take to obtain my exposed firearm permit too, http://www.bsis.ca.gov/customer_service/faqs/firearms_permit.shtml

That being said, I am sure there are reputable private security companies in California who do train their own above and beyond what is required by law. I just got hired with one of the largest private alarm response companies in southern California and I was shocked when I learned I would ride with an FTO for approximately 30 days before I was cut loose on my own. It seems this company does make the effort to ensure its patrol officers receive good training. We'll see....

Would you be willing to send me a pm with the company name?

BailBondInvestigator
04-22-2010, 03:09 PM
I have nothing of detail to add as my SoCal brethren have well covered it. To the private security officer it is simply a "feather in your cap" of sorts. It looks good on the resume. If you are in a position that requires it, the two-day "arrest and control" portion is a good introductory/starter course toward learning how to handle yourself (and others) on the job.

I got mine back in 2008 (it is good for 3 years if you don't obtain a sworn LE position) for Bail Enforcement work (as required by, the now defunct, PC 1299) but it has helped in the security field. It gets you noticed.

SoCalEMT
04-22-2010, 03:20 PM
Would you be willing to send me a pm with the company name?

PM sent to you.