PDA

View Full Version : Security Officer Incident Reports/Daily Activity Logs



LPCap
02-27-2008, 07:48 PM
I have a question regarding Security Officer Daily Activity Logs and Incident Reports.

I was talking to a few Security Officers who work unarmed security and they were telling me that a memo came from above stating that they were to shorten their daily logs and incident reports. There was a guy who had to read them and if they were too long, it took him too long. It was also explained to them that these weren't "legal" documents, just a piece of paper showing their bosses that they were working.

Two of the officers were upset because they (being former EMT's/911 operators) were trained on "if you don't document it, it didn't happen". One officer said many officers would have five line daily logs while theirs had twenty or so. Incident reports were not to exceed two paragraphs.

What do you think of this policy? Comments?

HotelSecurity
02-27-2008, 08:20 PM
I like incident reports to be as short & sweet as possible. I tend to get rookies that start there reports something like this: "I was on my routine patrol at 16h00 on the 16th floor of the hotel when the Operator called me on the walkie-talkie to go to room 1234 for a report of the smell of smoke..." Instead of "at 16h00 I was sent to room 1234 for the smell of smoke..."

copelandamuffy
02-27-2008, 08:50 PM
I have told my Guards after leaving for the weekend, that come Monday morning I would prefer that I cannot open the door to the Gatehouse, because it is over flowing
with paper work of Incident Reports and Daily Activity Reports, than the alternative of at
end of the weekend there is not a scrap of paper written of a serious incident.

If I cannot take the time to read all DARs from my Guards, and Incident Reports, then it is time for me to find a new job.

I welcome well thought out written DARs. If is a tad too windy or wordy, so
be it. I will let it pass.

Security
02-27-2008, 09:26 PM
I have told my Guards after leaving for the weekend, that come Monday morning I would prefer that I cannot open the door to the Gatehouse, because it is over flowing
with paper work of Incident Reports and Daily Activity Reports, than the alternative of at
end of the weekend there is not a scrap of paper written of a serious incident.

If I cannot take the time to read all DARs from my Guards, and Incident Reports, then it is time for me to find a new job.

I welcome well thought out written DARs. If is a tad too windy or wordy, so
be it. I will let it pass.

Agreed. I much rather read detailed DARs from my officers than barely anything at all. Sure, it can be a bit time consuming, but a true professional pays careful attention to the fine details instead of rushing through the job.

Security
02-27-2008, 09:31 PM
I like incident reports to be as short & sweet as possible. I tend to get rookies that start there reports something like this: "I was on my routine patrol at 16h00 on the 16th floor of the hotel when the Operator called me on the walkie-talkie to go to room 1234 for a report of the smell of smoke..." Instead of "at 16h00 I was sent to room 1234 for the smell of smoke..."

I disagree. If the aforementioned incident were to occur at my facility, I would probably be curious to know who it was that instructed my officer to investigate a smoke odor in Room 1234. Was it an employee? A hotel guest? A trespasser trying to distract security in an effort to commit a crime? "Short and sweet" is certainly easier, but not always preferable.

BoyInBlue
02-27-2008, 09:49 PM
I have a question regarding Security Officer Daily Activity Logs and Incident Reports.

I was talking to a few Security Officers who work unarmed security and they were telling me that a memo came from above stating that they were to shorten their daily logs and incident reports. There was a guy who had to read them and if they were too long, it took him too long. It was also explained to them that these weren't "legal" documents, just a piece of paper showing their bosses that they were working.

Two of the officers were upset because they (being former EMT's/911 operators) were trained on "if you don't document it, it didn't happen". One officer said many officers would have five line daily logs while theirs had twenty or so. Incident reports were not to exceed two paragraphs.

What do you think of this policy? Comments?

This policy is a joke. Just some lazy manager that doesn't want to read...

doulos Christou
02-27-2008, 09:52 PM
I always try to make mine as detailed as possible. One of my former trainers, hoji, you know him, told us that he was promoted on the basis of his report writing. On an average 12-hr post, I could usually get about 5 pages of incident reports. Of course, this was not always the case. When I was tired or had incidents occurring, I would leave out minute stuff and focus only on the important parts instead of recording my every move...

NRM_Oz
02-28-2008, 06:46 AM
Well we don't need to know shoe size but a shift log is different to an incident report. SL's will be a brief and an IR will be the facts of an incident. Some SL's are based on a time stamp (ie. 1 - 2 hour sections) and this may mean a statement such as "0100 - 0200 S/O Jones patrolled North Perimeter fenceline, Gates N1 and N2 secured by padlock NFTR (nothing further to report).

Now if you are going to report padlocks missing and holes found in fenceline you would probably complete an IR saying padlocks secured or gate secured with spare locks and cut fence line secured with cable ties with Police notified.

Again this was how it was shown to me 20 years ago by former police as the idea being that a brief of evidence was a summary with the annexures supporting the brief or summary for further information. Sometimes you may be patrol and radio back to base or partner that you have say a cut fence line and that person SHOULD record that conversation in your communications and site incident log (ie. what you do and when you do it).

The Lord of the Keys
02-28-2008, 07:34 AM
I've always ried to make incident reports as brief as possible, but it is important to iclude all of the data. There is a world of differece between reporting a multi-car accident and reporting that a lightswitch ism't working.
As for daily reports I like them to be as long as possible. I wanted to show the client that we were an active security team and not off somewhere sleeping. Anything I did would go down in the report.

doulos Christou
02-28-2008, 09:34 AM
I did work post with one officer who would go so far as to make note of head calls and smoke breaks in his log sheet. Then, he would fail to give an accurate or satisfactory description of the person who was just trying to break into a car. We had to coach him a little bit to get that ironed out...

EMTGuard
02-28-2008, 12:06 PM
I disagree. If the aforementioned incident were to occur at my facility, I would probably be curious to know who it was that instructed my officer to investigate a smoke odor in Room 1234. Was it an employee? A hotel guest? A trespasser trying to distract security in an effort to commit a crime? "Short and sweet" is certainly easier, but not always preferable. I have to agree with Security. When I write reports or read them I don't just want "Responded to report of a fire in the billet yard." Who reported the fire? By phone or company radio? What was on fire?
Just last week a pickup truck used by the Scrap Yard supervisor caught fire and the fire spread to a large dumpster nearby. The Shift Supervisor/EMT called 911 and had the fire department respond. Her Security Officer who works with her and does patrols and such never got out of his chair. When the Fire trucks arrived, instead of leading them into the plant or having her SO do so she called a contracter who works in the to drive up to the main gate and escort the fire department back to the burning truck.
The shift supervisor noted one line in the logbook and her incident report was hand written on a piece of scrap paper and taped to the front of a video monitor when the site supervisor showed up the next morning.
Security is about Observe and Report. None of the security staff made an attempt to Observe and a handwritten note on a piece of scrap paper is hardly a Report. Oh God I have to get that other job I applied for. I can't work with these slackoffs anymore.

N. A. Corbier
02-28-2008, 04:52 PM
This is not an acceptable shift report once it gets in a civil court:

0001 S/O John Jones on duty. All secure.
0100 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0200 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0300 Patrolled. A/S.
0400 Patrolled. A/S.
0500 Patrolled. A/S.
0600 Patrolled. A/S.
0700 Patrolled. Unlocked. A/S.
0800 Off duty.

They will tear this apart.

flashlightcop509
02-28-2008, 06:14 PM
This is not an acceptable shift report once it gets in a civil court:

0001 S/O John Jones on duty. All secure.
0100 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0200 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0300 Patrolled. A/S.
0400 Patrolled. A/S.
0500 Patrolled. A/S.
0600 Patrolled. A/S.
0700 Patrolled. Unlocked. A/S.
0800 Off duty.

They will tear this apart.

Yep...

I've read reports by the overnight officer to the effect of, "Let delivery guy for Dunkin Donuts in the food service door at 0430, locked same door at 0500"; Granted, that pretty much says it all, but if something were to go missing from those areas which were secured by the owners at closing during the time until opening, "delivery guy" really doesn't work for me...

By the same token, and I'm as guilty as some others, that when you type your report 20 minutes before ending shift, all you're thinking about is clocking out and going home; soooo, you may cut a few entries short as far as details you may think aren't important... which may come back to bite you in the seatwarmer one day. As Nathan stated, reports written by S/O's are considered Legal documents if brought into court, so best to keep track of every little thing that may call the performance of your duties (and the requirements of said duties by your company) into question...

NRM_Oz
02-29-2008, 02:02 AM
Yes agreed about the legalities as they are documents or records of activities of a particular site or activity. Our new state laws have really clamped down on meatheads making 1 line incident reports and even so far as coming on site, signing on, receiving brief, receiving WHAT equipment issued to you (ie. keys), listing what keys or ID cards are out on assignment (ie. visitors) and any faulty equipment such as chirp chirp radio units.

1 site I audited found 3 years of S/O Jones onsite - 12 hours later, S/O Jones offsite. Why would you bother writing anything like this at all ? Why bother showing up to work ? My first shift I was auditing the logs and I wrote what I was bringing onsite (ie. new radios) and accepted site keys only to hear "Oh we don't do that here". WTF !!!! These were 10 year S/O's.

Just in brief, I have followed the same formats and abbreviations used by the police in incident reports such as POI = Person Of Interest which the police use as well together with full terms explained. This cuts down alot of repeated use of "Offender" when this is not correct until the person has committed the crime.

OMG_Ihatethisjob
02-29-2008, 08:03 AM
This is not an acceptable shift report once it gets in a civil court:

0001 S/O John Jones on duty. All secure.
0100 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0200 Patrolled plant. All secure.
0300 Patrolled. A/S.
0400 Patrolled. A/S.
0500 Patrolled. A/S.
0600 Patrolled. A/S.
0700 Patrolled. Unlocked. A/S.
0800 Off duty.

They will tear this apart.

I get paid just 13% over the state's minimum wage:( You get what you pay for. This is how my DAR looks like. If there's any safety-relevent info, I write that in red, or highlight it. If it requires detail explanation, I fill out an "Incident Report" or "Discrepancy Report." Because I feel I'm underpaid, I write out my DAR the last 15 minutes before I get off.

Curtis Baillie
02-29-2008, 08:15 AM
I get paid just 13% over the state's minimum wage:( You get what you pay for. This is how my DAR looks like. If there's any safety-relevent info, I write that in red, or highlight it. If it requires detail explanation, I fill out an "Incident Report" or "Discrepancy Report." Because I feel I'm underpaid, I write out my DAR the last 15 minutes before I get off.Underpaid? But you still agreed to take the job. You may want to consider taking my advice - We're all free to seek employment elsewhere.

doulos Christou
02-29-2008, 11:52 AM
+ ALOT to Curtis. We all chose this field.
If you feel you are underpaid, go elsewhere or build your resume' and give yourself some room to negotiate. Do I make what I think I should? Of course not, my services to me are worth millions, but there isn't a guard company in the world that will pay it. Am I going to sit around a piss and moan and do my job poorly because I only make 9-something/hr? Nope, that's not what I get paid to do.

Echos13
02-29-2008, 01:35 PM
For a while all the CPOs where writing detailed SORs. It got to be about three pages. The central office said enough on "wasting" paper. We started the short to the point -obvious- lines. We have a journal we use for pass-on and significant occurrences. But according to management they "know" what our job is and feel making a detailed report about it all every day is redundant. We make contact with over 200 people a day. Same in information, PR, safety details, traffic and patrol. Building, parking lot and various other areas. Honestly it does take a lot of paper. I did not mind it but apparently someone in upper management did. Honestly I don’t think anyone reads these things unless an IR is made. We have no office at our post. Just a little cheap file cabinet tucked away in the corner of the attendants office. Enough room for blanks, just barely enough for completed forms. Each mouth they are picked up and sent –somewhere-? I was considering my own reports. But using official paperwork for our own use would get frowned upon. A personal journal is under consideration by most of us. Since a new outfit is going to take over the state’s control of security here we thought it may be a good idea. Unless this consortium outfit decides to require detailed reports. Sigh. It’s always the same issue is it not? They want this. But they prefer that because it’s not what they like and not what they think the other needs. Ai-ya! The unwritten book of CYA always comes in handy.

OMG_Ihatethisjob
02-29-2008, 03:57 PM
Underpaid? But you still agreed to take the job. You may want to consider taking my advice - We're all free to seek employment elsewhere.

The laws of economic survival dictates we pursue which ever skill / profession will reap the highest gain. These guard companies are billing the clients at least 60% over what they're paying us by the hour. I'm paid only 13% over the state's minimum wage. My other option is either warehousing, or the restaurant industry, which are both dominated by illegal aliens in the Los Angeles area, and only pay minimum wage.

I've called my guard company (and a number of others) pretending to be a potential client, shopping around for 24/7 guard service. The fees they quoted me leaves me to conclude every guard in the Los Angeles area are being exploited. They can easily pay us $10 an hour (20% over state minimum wage), and still turn a decent profit. Most guards I know are working 2 jobs with 2 different guard companies. $9 is the best I can find, till I secure an in-house position.

At least I'm doing my job constantly patrolling my shopping center. The other guard who relieves me will do an hourly patrol, hide and sleep for a while, then patrol again when his clock alarm goes off. Takes about 10 minutes to patrol the entire shopping center, and there are no detex keys to document the patrol was ever done. He's always tired because he's holding down a graveyard shift post, and juggling 2 jobs to make ends meet. I'm not going to report him because I feel this guard company deserves to get what they pay for.

The client isn't getting his money's worth, but this is the price he pays for contracting with a guard company, instead of going in-house and hiring his own staff of S/Os. If we loose this acct, its because my relief got caught sleeping. If I were holding down 2 jobs to make ends meet, I'd be asleep at my post too.

Curtis Baillie
02-29-2008, 05:17 PM
I just don't know what to say.:eek:

HotelSecurity
02-29-2008, 08:04 PM
The grass is not always greener on the other side. My In-house staff at one of my hotels make $10.50/hour. Quebec law regulates that contract Security guards make $12.50/hour. At the other 2 hotels owned by the same owner they make just over $14.00/hour but do all sorts of added value jobs that contract companies probably would not have their staff do.

gcmc security part 2
02-29-2008, 08:28 PM
I just don't know what to say.:eek:

Curtis,

I started a reply, deleted, retyped and finally said forget it, I can't deal with ignorance.

inman
03-01-2008, 11:34 AM
In the Security Industry, like other professions, the written word is an important “Tool of the Trade.” It is the means by which detailed, factual reports of events or incidents are recorded so that others may learn what has occurred and if necessary take action.

A Security Officer in the course of duties may encounter a myriad of events or incidents that will require the passing of factual information to person(s) who were not present at the event or incident. In order to effect this duty, the Security Officer must be able to accurately observe the event and then take those observations and put them on paper in a clear, concise and logical manner.

This passing of information takes the form of Notes and Reports.

Unfortunately, experience has shown us that many people lack appreciation of the value of taking good notes and preparing proper reports. There are no prerequisites set by employers on notes and reports in most instances, and the matter of notebooks and the manner of report writing is often left up to the individual Security Officer or his immediate supervisor’s discretion.

Experience has also shown us that many inaccurate reports are the direct result of inaccurate of incomplete notes. This has led to losses in assets, information, statistical data and convictions in court.

As you can see, both “Notes and Reports” are very important and that it becomes incumbent on the Security Officer to become as proficient and as professional in his/her use of these valuable tools.

Security reports are prepared by the Security Officer in order to pass on information to those concerned parties who are not present at the time of the incident or event. The report must be complete and accurate and answer all possible questions the reader might have.

Remember this point each time you set out to write a report. Your report must be clear and concise, accurate and complete. The reader of the security report must be able to understand what has occurred based on the contents of this report.

Remember, you must satisfy the questioning mind of your supervisor, who does not see you at work, and the judgment of your abilities will come from reading your reports. Your personal evaluation is often based largely on the type of report you submit, so take care in the preparation of your security reports.

A shift properly conducted, but inadequately reported, not only fails to provide the administration with the products needed for proper record keeping, but reflects on the protection officer’s total job performance. On the other hand, reports alone do not equal to an effective Security Officer.

Mr. Security
03-01-2008, 01:19 PM
Filling out reports at the end of a shift or later is a great way for doubt to be raised about the accuracy of the information since most, if not all, humans forget details as time goes by.

There may be times in an emergency were time will not allow a detailed report while the event is unfolding. Still, one should write down the basics so that the report can be completed accurately as soon as possible.