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Special Investigator
11-16-2006, 01:06 AM
http://www.westsky.com/bdgepage.jpg

Those of you who wear some type of badge, shield or star, what type/style of badge do you wear?

Feel free to post a pic if ya like.

Mall Director
11-16-2006, 02:27 AM
This is about what mine is based on, it differs from my staff, as mine indicates my position, but theirs are based the same with different titles:

http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/457193/original/badge1.jpg

Not exact, but close!

GCMC Security
11-16-2006, 03:36 AM
Wackenhut has a custom one, I'm sure we've all seen it lol :rolleyes:

N. A. Corbier
11-16-2006, 04:05 AM
I don't wear it, but I have a Smith and Warren M262A Series in Rhodium. Much like a "Geek Squad" badge, its mainly used as gimmick - since Cityscape Solutions is a Technical Security company, we have "Technical Security Agents." Sound familiar?

I will say this: I've had on-site clients comment that they like the idea we carry credential cases with badges. After all, when part of the remedies you scream is "Be sure of who your vendors are," its nice that they're checking them.

NAPSOA PSG uses generic badges for now, and will eventually use a semi-custom designed badge that does NOT look like Davis002's (hehehe) from SymbolArts. I have to decide which client of mine gets the referral, though.

I say "eventually" because those die fees are expensive, and part of the "semi-custom" is a custom center seal.

Special Investigator
11-16-2006, 07:49 PM
While I'm acting as a private investigator I'm not allowed to use a badge, shield or star but when I am in uniform I wear a 7-point star.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid218/pf204ff271e12eff8efc203549feabfd8/ec070ee5.jpg.thumb.jpg

ACP01
11-16-2006, 11:22 PM
Mine looks like Mall Directors just differant wording.

Lawson
11-16-2006, 11:42 PM
We are not issued a badge, but some have purchased their own, I am considering this...

http://i9.tinypic.com/48yx0mr.jpg

FDG06
11-17-2006, 02:30 AM
BHR..I like the looks of that, similar to Tacoma PD

davis002
11-17-2006, 04:11 AM
That's mine... Designed and Purchased through Symbol Arts. They are expensive, but worth it.

Investigation
11-17-2006, 04:52 AM
Many states, such as Washington, restrict the use of the center State seal. Here only commissioned law enforcement officers or persons employed directly by State agencies (corrections, State Security Officers, Inspectors) can use them. What are the laws in other states?

Mall Director
11-17-2006, 10:00 AM
You ahev a pretty sharp model. I have always been a fan of the "metro" style badges.. Reminds me of LA!

Lawson
11-17-2006, 12:04 PM
Many states, such as Washington, restrict the use of the center State seal. Here only commissioned law enforcement officers or persons employed directly by State agencies (corrections, State Security Officers, Inspectors) can use them. What are the laws in other states?
Uh... can you show me which RCW, WAC, or AGO says security can't use the state seal? I'm pretty sure in Washington anyone can use it. The private security RCW says nothing about using the state seal, all it says is you cant use any law enforcement emblems, which the seal is not.

RCW 43.04.050
Use of state seal — Prohibitions — Imitations.

(1) Except as otherwise provided in RCW 43.04.040, the state seal shall not be used on or in connection with any advertising or promotion for any product, business, organization, service, or article whether offered for sale for profit or offered without charge. [I guess it could apply here, but I doubt it]
(2) The state seal shall never be used in a political campaign to assist or defeat any candidate for elective office.

(3) It is a violation of this chapter to use any symbol that imitates the seal or that is deceptively similar in appearance to the seal, in any manner that would be an improper use of the official seal itself.

(4) Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit the reproduction of the state seal for illustrative purposes by the news media if the reproduction by the news media is incidental to the publication or the broadcast. Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit a characterization of the state seal from being used in political cartoons.

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RCW 18.170.160
Licenses required — Use of public law enforcement insignia prohibited — Penalties — Enforcement.

(1) After June 30, 1992, any person who performs the functions and duties of a private security guard in this state without being licensed in accordance with this chapter, or any person presenting or attempting to use as his or her own the license of another, or any person who gives false or forged evidence of any kind to the director in obtaining a license, or any person who falsely impersonates any other licensee, or any person who attempts to use an expired or revoked license, or any person who violates any of the provisions of this chapter is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

(2) After January 1, 1992, a person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she owns or operates a private security company in this state without first obtaining a private security company license.

(3) After June 30, 1992, the owner or qualifying agent of a private security company is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she employs an unlicensed person to perform the duties of a private security guard without issuing the employee a valid temporary registration card if the employee does not have in his or her possession a permanent private security guard license issued by the department. This subsection does not preclude a private security company from requiring applicants to attend preassignment training classes or from paying wages for attending the required preassignment training classes.

(4) After June 30, 1992, a person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she performs the functions and duties of an armed private security guard in this state unless the person holds a valid armed private security guard license issued by the department.

(5) After June 30, 1992, it is a gross misdemeanor for a private security company to hire, contract with, or otherwise engage the services of an unlicensed armed private security guard knowing that he or she does not have a valid armed private security guard license issued by the director.

(6) It is a gross misdemeanor for a person to possess or use any vehicle or equipment displaying the word "police" or "law enforcement officer" or having any sign, shield, marking, accessory, or insignia that indicates that the equipment or vehicle belongs to a public law enforcement agency.

(7) It is a gross misdemeanor for any person who performs the functions and duties of a private security guard to use any name that includes the word "police" or "law enforcement" or that portrays the individual or a business as a public law enforcement agency.

(8) It is the duty of all officers of the state and political subdivisions thereof to enforce the provisions of this chapter. The attorney general shall act as legal adviser of the director, and render such legal assistance as may be necessary in carrying out the provisions of this chapter.
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Nothing in there about using the state seal... I think In WA you can use it on a badge. If not, theres a lot of companies in trouble cause Ive seen lots of companies around using WA Seals.

Lawson
11-17-2006, 12:07 PM
That's mine... Designed and Purchased through Symbol Arts. They are expensive, but worth it.

Thats actually the design I wanted... but I couldnt find it. I wanted the 7point star since we are a county affiliated agency and our County Corrections and Sheriff's Deputies wear 7 point stars, however, being in the facility I am, I feel a star being ripped from my belt can easily become a weapon, so Im opting for the shield with a star on it.

bigdog
11-17-2006, 02:50 PM
Heres florida's law against using the state seal

493.6124 Use of state seal; prohibited.--No person or licensee shall use any facsimile reproduction or pictorial portion of the Great seal of the state of Florida on any badge, credentials, identification card, or other means of identification used in connection with any activities regulated under this chapter.

Investigation
11-18-2006, 04:55 AM
Uh... can you show me which RCW, WAC, or AGO says security can't use the state seal? I'm pretty sure in Washington anyone can use it. The private security RCW says nothing about using the state seal, all it says is you cant use any law enforcement emblems, which the seal is not.

RCW 43.04.050
Use of state seal — Prohibitions — Imitations.

(1) Except as otherwise provided in RCW 43.04.040, the state seal shall not be used on or in connection with any advertising or promotion for any product, business, organization, service, or article whether offered for sale for profit or offered without charge. [I guess it could apply here, but I doubt it]
(2) The state seal shall never be used in a political campaign to assist or defeat any candidate for elective office.

(3) It is a violation of this chapter to use any symbol that imitates the seal or that is deceptively similar in appearance to the seal, in any manner that would be an improper use of the official seal itself.

(4) Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit the reproduction of the state seal for illustrative purposes by the news media if the reproduction by the news media is incidental to the publication or the broadcast. Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit a characterization of the state seal from being used in political cartoons.

-------

RCW 18.170.160
Licenses required — Use of public law enforcement insignia prohibited — Penalties — Enforcement.

(1) After June 30, 1992, any person who performs the functions and duties of a private security guard in this state without being licensed in accordance with this chapter, or any person presenting or attempting to use as his or her own the license of another, or any person who gives false or forged evidence of any kind to the director in obtaining a license, or any person who falsely impersonates any other licensee, or any person who attempts to use an expired or revoked license, or any person who violates any of the provisions of this chapter is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

(2) After January 1, 1992, a person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she owns or operates a private security company in this state without first obtaining a private security company license.

(3) After June 30, 1992, the owner or qualifying agent of a private security company is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she employs an unlicensed person to perform the duties of a private security guard without issuing the employee a valid temporary registration card if the employee does not have in his or her possession a permanent private security guard license issued by the department. This subsection does not preclude a private security company from requiring applicants to attend preassignment training classes or from paying wages for attending the required preassignment training classes.

(4) After June 30, 1992, a person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if he or she performs the functions and duties of an armed private security guard in this state unless the person holds a valid armed private security guard license issued by the department.

(5) After June 30, 1992, it is a gross misdemeanor for a private security company to hire, contract with, or otherwise engage the services of an unlicensed armed private security guard knowing that he or she does not have a valid armed private security guard license issued by the director.

(6) It is a gross misdemeanor for a person to possess or use any vehicle or equipment displaying the word "police" or "law enforcement officer" or having any sign, shield, marking, accessory, or insignia that indicates that the equipment or vehicle belongs to a public law enforcement agency.

(7) It is a gross misdemeanor for any person who performs the functions and duties of a private security guard to use any name that includes the word "police" or "law enforcement" or that portrays the individual or a business as a public law enforcement agency.

(8) It is the duty of all officers of the state and political subdivisions thereof to enforce the provisions of this chapter. The attorney general shall act as legal adviser of the director, and render such legal assistance as may be necessary in carrying out the provisions of this chapter.
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Nothing in there about using the state seal... I think In WA you can use it on a badge. If not, theres a lot of companies in trouble cause Ive seen lots of companies around using WA Seals.


Right, if you work for a private business (e.g. private security) and you are using the official State seal in conjunction with your job, then it would appear that you are representing the State in some official capacity or that you derive your powers from the State. It would be prudent to stay away from the State seal and avoid possible impersonation issues with law enforcement (especially if you purchase your own badge). Sure, you may see other companies use the seal, but that does not make it legal. Tell me who they are and maybe I can address it with the powers at be.

Mr. Security
11-18-2006, 11:21 AM
.....Sure, you may see other companies use the seal, but that does not make it legal. Tell me who they are and maybe I can address it with the powers at be.

Please.....let it be. There are more important problems to deal with. If you want to enforce the law, then become a police officer and fight violent crime.

SecureTN
11-18-2006, 12:09 PM
Mine is similar to Mall Director's. Has Security Officer on it, and the Company seal.

Lawson
11-18-2006, 12:37 PM
. Tell me who they are and maybe I can address it with the powers at be.

Don Tardiff, Western Washington Merchant Patrol. www.merchantpatrol.com

When I worked there (bout 3, almost 4 years ago) I think I remember him wearing a seal on his badge. Im not certain, but I think the Lieutenants there wore seals on their badges too.

Edit to add:
If you look at the top left of that page I posted, theres a badge w/ a state seal. Its the same design my LT there wore.

Investigation
11-18-2006, 03:04 PM
Please.....let it be. There are more important problems to deal with. If you want to enforce the law, then become a police officer and fight violent crime.

How constructive of you to step in and offer that piece of valuable advice. Unless you know my experience and training, don’t come at me with some nonsense statement like that.

Mr. Security
11-18-2006, 03:14 PM
How constructive of you to step in and offer that piece of valuable advice. Unless you know my experience and training, don’t come at me with some nonsense statement like that.

Well now, I didn't mean to ruffle the feathers of a powerful piece of manpower like you. Allow me to get out of your way while you wield your influence on the powers that be. :rolleyes:

Bill Warnock
11-18-2006, 06:46 PM
How constructive of you to step in and offer that piece of valuable advice. Unless you know my experience and training, don’t come at me with some nonsense statement like that.
Ease off.
In security we wear what the company issues us.
As a LEO, I wore what was prescribed by my department.
When working part-time for a security company, my issued badge looked too much like a police badge and I commented to my company supervisor. I was told "The Company" was formed prior to the establishment of any established law enforcement agency, save the US Marshals Service and were exempt from the badge requirement.
I am sure that the average LEO will not make a specific guard from a recognized security comapny take-off the badge he was wearing. He would make a note of it and turn over the information to his leadership.
Enjoy the day,
Bill

security steve
11-19-2006, 09:52 AM
You can go to the firestore.com and customize your own badge. Our company issues gold badges with the company name and our unit number.

In DC, if you are wearing an outer garmet (jacket/sweater) your nameplate and badge must be visible on the outside or you are in violation of code. The same goes for your headgear, it must have a badge on it.

flashlightcop509
11-19-2006, 05:17 PM
I wish my company allowed nametags on outerwear... We're only allowed them on the uniform shirt, and not on the commando sweater or the jacket; The jacket issue being something about not wanting to put pin holes in it, but they make magnet back nametags so... :confused:

Same for the hats... I wear a CPO campaign hat, but no badge on that either, just the gold/black hat cord, although I've been told that even some of our local PD don't wear badges on their hats either...

Special Investigator
11-19-2006, 09:10 PM
Unless you know my experience and training, don’t come at me with some nonsense statement like that.


:cool: Then why don't you tell us all about your "experience & training. I'm sure some of us would love to hear all about it.

WKSecurity
11-20-2006, 11:57 PM
Here's our badge for Willis-Knighton

http://www.redlineadrenalin.com/hosting/files/8/PB190437.JPG

SecTrainer
11-25-2006, 08:16 AM
First off, be sure that it is indeed an EXACT replica of the state seal. Some of the "state seals" provided by badge companies are NOT exact replicas in that they use different colors...as here:

Compare the Washington seal in the bottom row of seals on this page:

http://www.smithwarren.com/catalog_80-56.php

...to the actual state seal on this page:

http://www.netstate.com/states/symb/seals/wa_seal.htm

If it's not an exact replica, what purpose is there in raising what amounts to an meaningless administrative quibble except to make a nuisance of yourself toward a brother in arms?

Mr. Security
11-25-2006, 08:44 AM
First off, be sure that it is indeed an EXACT replica of the state seal. Some of the "state seals" provided by badge companies are NOT exact replicas in that they use different colors...as here:

Compare the Washington seal in the bottom row of seals on this page:

http://www.smithwarren.com/catalog_80-56.php

...to the actual state seal on this page:

http://www.netstate.com/states/symb/seals/wa_seal.htm

If it's not an exact replica, what purpose is there in raising what amounts to an meaningless administrative quibble except to make a nuisance of yourself toward a brother in arms?

Well put. Thanks. :)

Mr. Security
11-25-2006, 08:45 AM
Here's our badge for Willis-Knighton

http://www.redlineadrenalin.com/hosting/files/8/PB190437.JPG

Sharp looking badge. I like it. :)

Lawson
11-25-2006, 09:26 AM
First off, be sure that it is indeed an EXACT replica of the state seal. Some of the "state seals" provided by badge companies are NOT exact replicas in that they use different colors...as here:

Compare the Washington seal in the bottom row of seals on this page:

http://www.smithwarren.com/catalog_80-56.php

...to the actual state seal on this page:

http://www.netstate.com/states/symb/seals/wa_seal.htm

If it's not an exact replica, what purpose is there in raising what amounts to an meaningless administrative quibble except to make a nuisance of yourself toward a brother in arms?

Actually, I think that seal is the one a lot of bona-fide PDs use here. If not exact, its pretty close.

http://i9.tinypic.com/2wmjbs2.jpg

SecTrainer
11-25-2006, 12:52 PM
Yup, because that's what's available from that particular badge company. However, this doesn't alter the fact that it's not the official state seal (police agencies using a particular version of a seal does not make it the "official state seal"), or - more importantly - the fact that this is a ridiculous administrative quibble that does not redound to the benefit of the industry in any way.

N. A. Corbier
11-25-2006, 05:45 PM
Its not about "benefiting the industry," though. Its about "protecting the public from the dangers of wannabe cops." This is the same reason that many states either prohibit anyone from using the state seal, or specifically prohibit security companies from doing so. (The plumber can, but you can't.)

I have read case law where "investigators" from the regulating agencies in the state have stated, "wannabe cop issues are rampant in the industry, and must be stamped out through aggressive enforcement."

One of our members, who was banned for making repeated personal attacks against other users, is a contract security guard with federal arrest powers due to his client being the United States Army. As part of his duties as a reserve police officer with LAPD, he "enjoyed" writing citations for individual guards displaying oval badges (some city ordinance violation) after he was called to deal with the guard's legitimate police problem.

That's right, folks, the police can be more interested in "protecting the public from security guards" than answering a criminal complaint, merely because it was from a security guard.

The guy who was all, "I'll make sure it goes to the proper authorities" is most likely an active police officer, a freshly retired police officer who thinks he's on the job, or more likely, a reservist or special police officer.

Many times, the loudest guys are the ones who are security guards with contract arrest authority. If the DoD sticks "Police" in your title, you're automatically a brother in blue. If they stick anything else, you're an f-ing security guard that stole a real cop's job.

SecTrainer
11-26-2006, 09:16 AM
I agree with much of what you say, Mr. Corbier.

Actually, the issue of "wannabe cops" presents more of a problem to our own industry than it does to the cops, IMHO, because we ourselves don't need such people. What if dental schools accepted people who really wished they could have been podiatrists and who then, after graduation, fiddled with their patient's feet while they're in the dentist's chair? That would be strange, wouldn't it? We would think that dental schools weren't doing a very good job of selecting applicants for the profession of dentistry, wouldn't we? Well, it's no different from selecting people for the field of security who wish they were cops and who then fiddle around with "cop duties" while they should be performing their security missions.

As a distinct (and, may I say, proud) discipline all its own, the security industry should be attracting people who want to be security professionals, and who understand that the security professional is not by any means the same thing as a cop. While there is some overlap with our cousin domain, for the most part both the bodies of knowledge (BOK) and the skill sets required for the practitioners in the private protection domain are very different from those required in the public domain - which is the main reason that cops do not necessarily (or automatically) make good security people. There may be as many cops who would be utter failures in security as there are the other way around...these are *different professions*.

It isn't, then, really a matter at heart of whether a seal is used on a badge or a patrol car...or whether the car is painted black and white. These regulations have often been necessary because of a more basic problem, namely that many in our own industry feel inferior to the police. Believing that the security profession is really "junior policing" - instead of being its own distinct and complex discipline - they have wanted to look more like "the grownups". Some, perhaps, have never really been clear about what being a security officer is really all about.

In many ways, the domain of policing is, indeed, more "grownup" and better respected by the public than the domain of security, but the answer to this problem is not to be found in trying to simply "look like police", which amounts to putting lipstick on the pig. Borrowing from Shakespeare: "The answer is not in the stars (on our shields), dear Brutus...it is in ourselves."

We can, however, take a page from police history. It was not but a few decades ago that policing was NOT considered a profession. The field was riddled with corruption and mismanagement, salaries were abysmal (and actually still are in some parts of the country), standards for hiring and training were lacking in all but the larger departments, and oversight was a joke. Policing was in some cases a refuge for misfits and you could find felons working as police officers just as you can now in security. The public perception of police officers was very low, and mothers weren't hoping their kids would grow up to be cops.

It took the Omnibus Crime Act, passed in response to zooming crime rates, to turn things around and I won't go into that history, which you can discover for yourselves. Suffice it to say that the development of standards, together with the funding made available for the LEEP program and for better academies, along with the creation of degree programs in universities, have all turned things around in the public domain. We can do the same in ours.

But...we face one huge hurdle that the public domain did not have to deal with, which is that we as an industry have exquisitely trained our clients to think almost exclusively in terms of the lowest bid as the only legitimate differentiator among security providers. This has resulted in a mad "race to the bottom" in which the drive to submit lower and lower bids has fallen mainly on the shoulders of the individual officer, who cannot be paid to be a professional - meaning: carefully selected, trained as such and properly equipped. I am not sure what it will take to change this culture of the price-based (commoditizing) business model, but if we all *want* to change it - and it is in all of our best interests to do so - I believe it can be done and *must* be done because we are not the only losers with such a model...our clients lose as well, only we make sure they don't know it. In some cases, clients are actually paying for increased liability and increased INsecurity because of the low-bidder system and the resulting crap they get for security officers as a result (please pardon my language, but no other word seemed to fit).

Who can doubt that the so-called "standards" for security agencies and officers that have been passed by the various states are ridiculous? And who can doubt that the very existence of such "standards" tends to suck the oxygen out of any efforts to pass REAL standards? The problem is that among the political forces who wish to maintain the status quo, the loudest are the security companies - especially the larger ones - themselves, and clients don't know they're being cheated, so the impetus for change must come from elsewhere. "Elsewhere", IMHO, can only be the creation of high standards at the state level as the federal government does not consider it proper to meddle in state control of the industry (or most other professions, either, for that matter). The only other source of change would be a professional organization such as ASIS, but ASIS is unfortunately held hostage to the "interests" of security companies.

It is time, perhaps, that individual officers formed a PAC that would demand that the states initiate higher standards, realizing that this would not (as those with a corrupt interest in lower standards claim) result in a net loss of jobs, but would instead transform the industry and improve the compensation and other working conditions for officers, just as it did for police officers. Remember, exactly the same cry of complaint (higher standards==>higher wages==>fewer officers) was raised by police departments when they were first forced to accept higher standards, and we all know what happened instead. Public trust rose, and as it did so the public (the police "clients") proved willing to pay for more officers because they felt they were getting what they were paying for. The changes in policing were also well publicized so that the public understood that safety cannot always be purchased on the cheap. I think it is inarguable that everyone - both the police and their "clients" - have benefited from the transformation and I see no reason that the same would not happen in our domain as well. If security companies are too short-sighted to see this themselves and transform themselves, they will have to have transformation thrust upon them externally.

T202
11-26-2006, 07:34 PM
One of our members, who was banned for making repeated personal attacks against other users, is a contract security guard with federal arrest powers due to his client being the United States Army. As part of his duties as a reserve police officer with LAPD, he "enjoyed" writing citations for individual guards displaying oval badges (some city ordinance violation) after he was called to deal with the guard's legitimate police problem.

That's right, folks, the police can be more interested in "protecting the public from security guards" than answering a criminal complaint, merely because it was from a security guard.

I believe that our ex-member's actions are the exception not the rule. I could have cared less what shape a security officers badge was.

Mr. Security
11-26-2006, 09:45 PM
I believe that our ex-member's actions are the exception not the rule. I could have cared less what shape a security officers badge was.

Ditto with the local cops over here too. As long as you aren't trying to act like a cop, they have bigger fish to fry. Now, at the state level.....hope I never have to find out. :)

Lawson
11-26-2006, 10:48 PM
Ive only met one officer in our state who may have a distaste for security officers. He was telling a story about a night when he went on a traffic stop and the guy he was trying to stop pulled over in the parking lot of a bar. So naturally everyone is heckling and yelling at him, and eventually a fight ensues and he isn't winning, he ends up saying, "eventually someone from ------ ------- Security stopped by, you know; one of those wanna-be's; and helped me out."

I was dumbfounded... you're in a losing battle, and a Security Officer helps you out and we're still "Wannabe's?" Kiss my ***.

N. A. Corbier
11-27-2006, 02:14 AM
Would of been morbidly funny if the security person stopped, observed, reported, and left.

"Hey! You f-ing guard! Help me!"

"I can't, Officer, state law says that I can only observe and report, and not even you can override that."

N. A. Corbier
11-27-2006, 02:16 AM
I believe that our ex-member's actions are the exception not the rule. I could have cared less what shape a security officers badge was.

It depends on the agency and the individual, honestly. I have seen deputies arrest a poor guy for driving a white/green security vehicle, in violation of Chapter 30, Florida Statutes. No one has even HEARD of Chapter 30 (Regulation of Sheriffs), yet these guys popped this poor guy for it.

Even better? The deputies who were "patrolling" the mall used to have the account, and when the mall changed hands... They were dumped for the management company's inhouse guards.

I don't think its so much an exception as a personal problem with the LEO in question. They have a chip on their shoulder against a segment of violators, and look to go after them aggressively during every contact. In this case, its security personnel.

tlangsr
03-03-2007, 10:20 PM
I wear a "wash and wear" badge now, but when I was wearing one it was the wackenhut badge and while transporting I wore a 6 Pointed star.

SecureTN
03-04-2007, 12:51 AM
Bad pic... Sorry for that. It says Correctional Officer across the top, Department Of Correction across the bottom, and has the TN State Seal in the middle.

Qarlo X64
03-05-2007, 01:50 PM
http://i177.photobucket.com/albums/w219/Qarlo_X64/PSO-PatrolHat.jpg

The above is a picture of the "standard" baseball cap style patrol hat with the generic S/O badge on it that is the same as our duty badges, however the badge on the hat isn't from the company. I had to go out and buy my own cover + security officer badge to put on it. Most are only required to wear a black hat or beanie that state's "Security" in white letters, but I figured since the badge is the exact same one the PSC I work for uses on the uniform, might as well have it on the patrol hat. A lot of companies I've seen as of late have gone to either this template or another 3 different ones that are purely generic and universal, versus regular badges. *Apparently there is this horror story going around about how some LEO or PSO (don't remember which now) got his eye pierced with the sharp point of his badge, when an assailant ripped it from his uniform, so now due to liability issues, a number of companies are using these washable types. Personally I prefer the regular badges.

UtahProtectionForce
03-06-2007, 07:47 AM
they are starting to do that here in utah 90 % of LEOs wear non metalic-sown in names and badges, many security companies out here have switched to that in the 2 years... same sort of thing.. .rumor of how bad guys are learning to rip the badges off uniforms and use them as weps.. about 75% of security companies out here now use the sown in type of uniform...

oh btw my current company uses generic style badges..

SecTrainer
03-06-2007, 03:43 PM
"Pin-on" badges can get lost more easily, too.

Plus, there's this little thing about presenting a handy reflective target right above the heart and above the forehead - the two worst places to put targets, eh? I remember when one police department (in Australia? I don't remember) went to wearing badges on the right side after a shooting incident where the perp said he aimed at the badge, and there are real old photos floating around showing that the badge used to be worn in olden days on the right instead of the left.